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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Day-Devoted-to-Education.aspxA Day Devoted to EducationGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-09-26T04:00:00ZShow Daily staff<p>​ASIS 2017 kicked off with its first full day devoted to education, featuring sessions on the most pressing priorities and issues for security management professionals.</p><p>Attendees had the opportunity to listen to experts share their personal experiences in security, lead deep dives and panels, and gain insights from 43rd U.S. President George W. Bush and entrepreneur Mark Cuban. </p><p>Read below about a few of the sessions that the <em>Show Daily</em> team attended throughout the day.</p><h4> Change Management</h4><p>Change management can be challenging, but it is crucial that security leaders who also want to be business leaders know how to apply its principles. </p><p>Fifty-four percent of change management efforts in the U.S. workplace succeed—meaning that almost half fail, according to a study by The Katzenbach Center. Effective change leadership needs to be more widespread in the U.S. business world. </p><p>Given this, two leadership experts, Bonnie Michelman, CPP, a former ASIS president who is now executive director of security and outside services for Massachusetts General Hospital, and David Gibbs, CPP, principal at Exante360, presented a primer on change management at the education session, "Change Management: Optimizing an Organization's Sanity and Success." </p><p>At the session, Gibbs and Michelman reviewed the underlying philosophy, landmines, and cycles of change management. They sketched out the principles of successful change management and how to incorporate them into a strategic plan and employee development program.</p><p>The principles of a change manager that the two experts discussed included: </p><p>Addressing the human side of the change initiative and the positive effects it will have if successful. "People want to do something important," Michelman said.</p><p>Assessing the cultural landscape of every company involved. This is especially true if the change is a merger, and the two companies have very different cultures.</p><p>Starting at the top. Leaders at the highest levels should be directly involved.</p><p>Involving every layer of the corporation. Any department or organizational level, be it middle managers or frontline workers, can kill change management if they have not bought in.</p><p>Making the formal case for the change. Make sure everyone understands the true reasons and why it will be beneficial. </p><p>Creating ownership with people invested in the outcome because of their contributions and direct involvement.</p><p>Overcommunicating and spelling out exactly what needs to be done and what people's roles are.</p><p>Preparing for the unexpected, and having contingency plans if the unexpected does occur.</p><p>Being transparent, clear, and honest for the real reasons behind the change, even if that means conceding that previous strategies and plans did not work out.</p><p>With these principles in mind, the change leaders should strive for several objectives, including buy-in and involvement by all involved, positive impact, clear communications, and readiness. </p><p>The last objective is particularly important; company leaders must ensure that the change does not happen until there is a readiness for it, which comes through proper preparation.</p><p>And finally, change managers should make the effort to truly understand the impact the initiative will have on each employee, not just on the company as a whole. </p><p>"Walk a mile in the shoes of those who will be changed in this process," Michelman said. </p><p>The session was supported by the Healthcare Security Council and the Leadership and Management Practices Council.​</p><h4>Emergency Response</h4><p>The ASIS Retail and Loss Prevention Council sponsored an interactive session on emergency response to active shooter situations at retailers, led by Alan Greggo, CPP, regional asset protection manager of Microsoft. </p><p>Attendees split up into three groups to discuss how they would approach an active shooter scenario, and it quickly became clear that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to crisis management for retailers. </p><p>While some attendees suggested following the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Run. Hide. Fight. approach to responding to an active shooter, one attendee pointed out that his facility is at the top of a high-rise building and running down 100 flights of stairs is not an option.</p><p>"We're all pros at this stuff, but everyone had to think a little bit—there was some debating," Greggo noted after the interactive exercise. "When you're devising a plan, it's really important for everyone to have a say at the table. However, the only person who can make decisions about what to do in the moment is the person right there in the building who's going through it. Most of us looking from the outside in get a phone call and give advice, but every shooting is different."</p><p>Greggo walked attendees through several active shooter threats that Microsoft stores have experienced, and attendees joined in by discussing how best practices differed from store to store, whether it was in a mall, a shopping center, or a standalone facility. ​</p><h4>Latin America</h4><p>How do you do business in Latin America? A panel of security experts from the region discussed factors to take into consideration, from risks and threats to communication styles and compliance. </p><p>Maria Teresa Septien, director, Latin America at AFIMAC Global, is from Mexico; Alfredo Iturriaga, CPP, external security consultant at GNL Quintero South America, is from Chile; and Alex Omar Garrido, CPP, with Grupo Gresinsa, is from Panama. </p><p>Iturriaga opened by discussing the threats and risks that come with doing business in Latin America. Beyond the obvious concerns like corruption and organized crime, he listed issues at the root of those problems. Poverty, the inequality gap between rich and poor, and young people who didn't finish school and don't work all lead to bigger problems in Latin America, he explained. Over the past five years, migration has become a problem as well, he noted.</p><p>"Three percent of Latinos feel pushed to move away to escape from crime," Iturriaga said. "This specific problem occurs when legislation about immigration is very old. They do not have the legal tools to regulate this problem."</p><p>Septien described the unique aspects of Latin American culture that managers need to take into consideration when conducting business with global organizations. She encouraged attendees to study vetted research on international cultural and communication styles to understand how to relate to other countries. </p><p>For example, European countries tend to be individualistic and objective when it comes to business, and Asian countries value collectiveness and avoid confrontation.</p><p>"Some of the basic traits of Latin Americans are our emotions, the importance of family, and we talk a lot and don't take into consideration timeliness like other cultures," Septien said, to laughter. </p><p>Setting expectations with Latin American countries, and being thoughtful about communication methods—not just a potential language barrier but communication styles—will go far to create seamless global alliances.</p><p>Garrido went on to list traits of an ideal international business partner, including someone who understands the industry and can be a strategic thinker and confident communicator.</p>

Public/Private Partnerships

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Emergency-Management.aspx2016-10-24T04:00:00ZBook Review: Emergency Management
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Terrorism-Trends.aspx2016-09-01T04:00:00ZTerrorism Trends
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-August-2016.aspx2016-08-01T04:00:00ZIndustry News August 2016
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/-Wanted---Private-Sector-Help.aspx2016-02-12T05:00:00ZWanted: Private Sector Help
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Rising-Resilience.aspx2015-10-05T04:00:00ZRising Resilience
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review--The-Business-of-Counterterrorism.aspx2015-09-01T04:00:00ZBook Review: The Business of Counterterrorism
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Communication-in-Crisis.aspx2015-09-01T04:00:00ZCommunication in Crisis
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-August-2015.aspx2015-08-01T04:00:00ZSM Online August 2015
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-New-Cyber-Nucleus.aspx2015-07-06T04:00:00ZA New Cyber Nucleus
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Interoperability-for-the-Safe-City-.aspxInteroperability for the Safe City <p>​​Today's cities often use video management systems or other platforms to view camera footage, protect citizens and property, analyze incidents, evaluate security, and determine appropriate responses to events like natural disasters, disruptions to public transit and other municipal services, and other threats to public safety. <br><br>Cities implementing this connected security approach are typically referred to as safe or smart cities. Most safe cities share a common infrastructure and operate using sensors and cameras over a shared municipal network. Synthesizing information from these sensors and the data from other devices through one interface, government officials and law enforcement are afforded a comprehensive view of a city's security.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Integrating the Many Parts of a Safe City</strong></p><p>There are operational challenges that accompany the many systems that are included in a safe city deployment. Interoperability continues to present one of the greatest challenges, particularly with video management systems, video recording devices, and cameras. The most common scenario is that municipalities have several management systems for city operations that were created by different manufacturers, each with proprietary interfaces for integration.<br><br>To connect their different systems together, cities often end up employing a single-vendor "build once and maintain forever" approach, in which the continuing cost for integration of systems becomes prohibitively expensive. In a world where technology and features change quickly, this approach is not practical because it severely limits an end user's ability to try new technology and different vendors' products and requires a substantial financial commitment to specific manufacturers and proprietary interfaces.<br></p><p><strong>Standards in Safe Cities </strong></p><p>ONVIF was founded in 2008 by Axis, Sony, and Bosch to create a global standard for the interface of IP-based physical security products. The organization was developed to provide increased flexibility and greater freedom of choice, so installers and end users can select interoperable products from a variety of different vendors. </p><p>Product interoperability is a driving force behind ONVIF. Interoperability is a simple concept: it is the ability of a product or system to work with another product or system, often from different brands made by different manufacturers. </p><p>ONVIF profiles are subsets of the overall ONVIF specification. They group together sets of related features to make product selection easier for end users, consultants, and systems integrators. Products must be conformant with one (or more) of ONVIF's specific profiles. </p><p><strong><em>ONVIF's current profiles are:</em></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><p><strong>Profile S</strong> for IP-based video and audio streaming, including:​<br></p><ul><li>Video and audio streaming<br></li><li>Pan-tilt-zoom control and relay output<br></li><li>Video configuration and multicast<br> </li></ul><p><strong>Profile G</strong> for edge storage and retrieval, including:</p><ul><li>Configure, request, and control recording from conformant devices<br></li><li>Receive audio and metadata stream<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile C</strong> for IP-based access control, including:</p><ul><li>Site information and configuration<br></li><li>Event and alarm management<br></li><li>Door access control<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile Q</strong> for easy configuration and advanced security, including:</p><ul><li>Out-of-box functionality<br></li><li>Easy, secure configuration<br></li><li>Secure client/device communications using transport layer security (TLS)<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile A</strong> for Broader Access Control Configuration</p><ul><li>Granting/revoking credentials, creating schedules, changing privileges<br></li><li>Enables integration between access control and IP video management system<br> <br></li></ul><p><strong>Profile T</strong> for Advanced Video Streaming is currently in draft form and is scheduled for initial release in 2018. </p><p>Standards, such as those from ONVIF, provide the common link between disparate components of safe city systems. Designed specifically to overcome the challenges in multi-vendor environments, ONVIF's common interfaces facilitate communication between technologies from different manufacturers and foster an interoperable system environment where system components can be used interchangeably, provided they conform to the ONVIF specification. </p><p>In 2014, ONVIF member company Meyertech helped the city of York, United Kingdom, deploy a safe city solution for the city's public spaces and transportation system. Using Meyertech video management software (VMS) and information management software, the city integrated IP cameras with the many legacy systems for its York Travel and Control Centre command center. </p><p>The city's control room monitors more than 150 cameras from different manufacturers in York, and city representatives reported an immediate impact on crime rates. The integration of legacy and new IP cameras with the new VMS, which interfaced with the information management software, was made possible through ONVIF's video specification. </p><p>A standardized approach for both file format and associated players, which is often a challenge in multi-vendor environments, is also provided by ONVIF, increasing the efficiency of the process and also adding the potential of including metadata—for example, data from an analytic, indicating number of objects, speed of objects, or even colors—in exported materials and reports. Standardized file formats include MPEG4, H.264, and, with Profile T, H.265, which are readable by many standard video players on the market, including Windows Media Player, VLC, DVD players, and many more. </p><p>ONVIF has also released an export file format specification that outlines a defined format for effective export of recorded material and forensics. These specifications together make it possible not only to integrate devices in multi-vendor video security system deployments in safe city environments, but also to offer a common export file format that can streamline post-event investigations where authorities are trying to react as quickly as possible to apprehend suspects or to defuse an ongoing situation.<strong> </strong></p><p>Another ONVIF member, Huawei, is considered a leader in smart city solutions. Huawei's video management system was used in Shanghai, China, as part of the Chinese Ministry of Public Security's safe cities construction initiative. One of the key challenges of the project was to integrate old and new technology. Huawei's VMS uses ONVIF to integrate cameras from manufacturers Dahua, Haikang, Axis, Sony, and others.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Multi-Discipline Standards</strong></p><p>A multi-discipline physical security standard that specifies parameters for video surveillance, access control, and other essential operations of a safe city command center would likely increase the prevalence of safe cities even further.</p><p>Many in the broader technology industry see standards as an important component in both safe cities and the Internet of things (IoT). The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and other standards groups are already working on IoT standards for technology-based industries, and some experts that global IoT standards will be introduced by the end of this year. </p><p>As standards and industries collaborate even further and establish minimum interoperability standards together, the need for a multi-discipline physical security standard will become more urgent. ONVIF envisions that all physical security systems will eventually have the same interfaces for interoperability, and the organization is dedicated to facilitating the work of its members in developing such a multi-discipline standard. </p><p><em>Jonathan Lewit is chairman of the ONVIF Communication Committee.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/21st-century-security-and-cpted-designing-critical-infrastructure-protection-and-crime-prev-0.aspx21st Century Security and CPTED: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Crime Prevention, Second Edition.<div class="body"> <p> <em> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">CRC Press. Available from ASIS, item #2078; 954 pages; $120 (ASIS member), $132 (nonmember). Also available as e-book.</span> </span> </em> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">As good as the first edition of 21st Century Security and CPTED was, this second edition surpasses it. Atlas, known in security circles as a consummate professional, has done an outstanding job in creating this second edition, which has twice as much material as the original edition. It also includes voluminous references and hundreds of outstanding clarifying photos in both color and black-and-white. Using humor and candid insight he incorporates all the concepts of CPTED, including design, construction, security countermeasures, and risk management strategies, and merges them into a highly informative reference manual for security practitioners at every level.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">There is a logical flow to the book. It lays a solid foundation by discussing architecture and its intent, as well as environmental crime control theories and premises liability. There is something here for everyone as it also discusses terrorism and critical infrastructure from differing perspectives. Several chapters on problem solving provide guidance on conducting threat, risk, and vulnerability assessments.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Throughout, Atlas provides a roadmap for merging security and CPTED into management principles and practices in a wide variety of facility settings, including healthcare facilities, critical infrastructure, ATMs, office buildings, parking lots and structures, and parks and green spaces. The latter portion of the book is reserved for concepts including lighting, LEED and GREEN certification, workplace violence, signage, data capture and analysis, and conducting CPTED surveys.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Atlas has created the definitive book on CPTED and security. Despite the magnitude and complexity of the science and art of security management, he has done an outstanding job of merging these and other disciplines and concepts together into a cogent display of information that the reader should be able to apply in a wide variety of locations and situations. If you are only going to buy one book this year, it is strongly suggested you purchase this one. </span> </span> </p> <hr /> <p> <span style="color:#800000;"> <strong> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Reviewer:</span> </span> </strong> </span> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;"> Glen Kitteringham, CPP, has worked in the security industry since 1990. He holds a master’s degree in security and crime risk management. He is president of Kitteringham Security Group Inc., which consults with companies around the globe. </span> </span> </p> </div>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Communication-in-Crisis.aspxCommunication in Crisis<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">In the days following the derecho that ravaged a path stretching from Illinois to the Maryland-Virginia coast in June 2012, local companies and national aid organizations scrambled to organize and respond to the widespread destruction, death, and power outages across the route. Some 4.2 million citizens were left without power for several days. The storm coincided with one of the deadliest heat waves the region had seen in decades. Victims scoured social media websites for information about relief organizations and aid, and learned that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was deploying generators to provide electricity.</span></p><p>Hopeful citizens began flooding the agency with requests to have generators delivered to their homes. However, there was one problem: The giant, industrial-sized generators FEMA was delivering were intended to power community centers, firehouses, and shelters—not individual houses. </p><p>“We saw those conversations and wanted to help set expectations,” explains Shayne Adamski, senior manager of digital engagement with FEMA. “We wanted folks to know how we were being helpful, so we posted a photo of one of the generators and commented about how it would be used in an impacted area. Once folks saw that, they realized they weren’t individual generators that a person could go pick up at Home Depot and have running in their backyard.”</p><p>Adamski cites this example as a way FEMA leverages social media during a disaster. Indeed, people are increasingly turning to social media during emergency events to gather immediate information, and checking social media websites is becoming an alternative when traditional forms of communication have been less effective. Most of the messages transmitted through social media are from nontraditional media sources, such as FEMA. However, the medium has allowed traditional news agencies to leverage public experiences—every smart-device user in the world has the potential to be an information broadcaster.</p><p>Social media has completely changed the way people engage with one another and, more importantly, how businesses connect with potential clients and customers. Social media has become the one common denominator that the world’s wired citizens understand and use on a daily basis. The preferred online applications may change from country to country, but ability to reach mass numbers of people quickly has been accomplished through social media.       </p><p>The ASIS International Crisis Management and Business Continuity Council conducted a survey on how social media is being used in emergency management. The resulting study, Social Media Is Transforming Crisis Management, concludes that many security professionals around the world are using some aspect of social media for emergency notification, keeping stakeholders engaged, and making critical documents more accessible.</p><p>The study confirms that social media is establishing its place in emergency operations planning and execution. However, emergency operations professionals require additional training to learn how to best create alert messaging; 52 percent of respondents have not used social media for an emergency event and 25 percent have never used social media at all.</p><p>Security professionals realize that additional learning will be required to fully embrace and exploit social media in crisis management situations. More than 75 percent of those surveyed agreed that more knowledge is required to expand social media to a wider audience in emergency operations. </p><p>However, many survey participants said they were reluctant to embrace social media. Several respondents expressed the need to preserve the old ways of doing things to ensure that the widest possible audience, including those people with no access to social media or newer technology, receives critical crisis management information. </p><p>Many federal agencies, such as FEMA, have been developing comprehensive social media strategies to communicate with citizens in emergencies. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate has established working groups to provide guidance and best practices to emergency preparedness and the response community. </p><p>However, even with the millions of people who are flocking to social media sites, the government has yet to establish an emergency management platform, and security professionals are struggling to fully embrace social media as well, according to the ASIS study. </p><p>Below are six steps for companies to consider when using social media during a disaster. FEMA’s Adamski notes that security professionals should keep in mind that although social media is not a comprehensive solution—not everyone is on the same channels—taking advantage of multiple outlets helps get information out to a wider audience.​</p><h4>Technology </h4><p>Social media is being used in one of two ways during emergencies: to disseminate information and receive feedback, and as a systematic tool to conduct emergency communications. Although security managers may be reluctant to rely on social media for emergency communication, social media use during disasters is gaining traction.</p><p>However, some hesitancy is prudent because it is taking some communities decades to navigate new technology platforms—adopting Twitter as a communications device, for example. Managers should be mindful of their responsibility for employees during an emergency and ensure that advances in technology are included in procedures and processes. During an emergency in which social media is used to provide announcements and updates, there is an opportunity to include a wider audience than that reached by a simple public address system, but this requires planning.</p><p> For example, if smart devices are expected to act as one of the methods to facilitate a conduit between the company and employees, the details must be established and tested in advance. If specific phone numbers, media accounts, or Web pages are used to send out announcements, it is important that the contact details are identified and the people sending out the messages understand exactly what must be done.</p><p>Adamski explains that security managers should consider their audiences when deciding what platforms to communicate with. To reach employees, for example, a public social media channel may not be the best option. “Look at what tools or channels their customers are on,” Adamski says. “Not everybody is necessarily on one social media channel. If you’re trying to get on every single social media channel, you’re stretched too thin, and your core audience may not even be on that channel.”</p><p>Collaborative techniques are required, and building partnerships between emergency management professionals and individuals involved in the response will require new alliances to be successful. It is desirable to include local and regional governmental resources, nearby companies that may share the risk of an emergency, any organizations involved in a mutual agreement of understanding to provide resources during an emergency, any contractor or vendor relationships, and all of the various internal elements within the company. All of this must take place well before an emergency so that trust is developed and agreements are established among the stakeholders. Within the company, it may be necessary to break out of the silo environment and work collaboratively to establish plans and processes designed to facilitate a stronger response to an emergency.​</p><h4>Devising Strategy</h4><p>Emergency operations professionals may require additional training to learn how to best create alert messages and ensure that communication lines are established with citizens before, during, and after the crisis. A good starting point for developing a social media emergency response strategy is to adhere to the traditional four phases of emergency management: prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. </p><p>Although FEMA has a dedicated staff for crisis communication, Adamski says that businesses can often train an existing staff member to wear multiple hats and manage social media communications, even if it’s something they only work on for 10 percent of their time. </p><p>“Maybe that staff member does a lot of training before disasters, so that person can conduct their day-to-day responsibilities, and wear the emergency hat if necessary,” Adamski explains. “You’ve got to look at the internal organization and operation and skillset and where things can be moved around, and find out what’s best for that individual organization. Sometimes you’d be surprised how you can come up with good, creative solutions.”</p><p>Adamski also stresses the importance of training multiple people to use social media during a crisis, so that there are backup personnel who can be put on shifts during ongoing emergencies.</p><p>Emergency managers will need to create social media platforms they intend to use, and then popularize those sites so the public knows to turn to them in times of crisis. “Practice on those channels and use them before an emergency, so the first time you’re using them is not during an emergency,” Adamski advises.</p><h4>Managing Expectations</h4><p>Adamski refers to the 2012 derecho situation as a time when managing expectations became as important as standard crisis communications. A challenge FEMA often faces is educating people on its role during a disaster, and the organization turns to social media in an emergency to explain to affected communities how it’s helping, Adamski notes.</p><p>Focusing on one unified message will help maintain the ability to manage information. While crisis managers cannot control individual citizens’ input, the messages being relayed from authoritative sources must be consistent, reliable, and trustworthy. Multiple resources are needed to combine data streams that will ultimately improve data management. Creating in-depth feedback protocols will be necessary to understand developments and concerns from residents actively being affected by the crisis.      </p><p>Ron Robbins, who manages FEMA’s National Business Emergency Operations Center (NBEOC), says that another key to maintaining a unified message is engaging with other businesses and agencies that might be affected by the same emergency. Members of the NBEOC, for example, sign agreements to share information when they are faced with situations where the private sector may have operations that could be affected.</p><p>“You have to practice what mechanism you’re going to use and who your touch points are going to be,” Robbins explains. “There’s a lot of different angles you can work at this, and it’s paramount for everybody to understand who and what is needed to communicate, and to practice that.” </p><p>For example, when the NBEOC is activated, Robbins says FEMA starts reaching out to its partners, sharing situational awareness and information to organizations that may not have robust operations center capabilities. </p><p>“We try to be forward-leaning about what’s happening to keep our partners aware so that they can communicate with their employees and make decisions at their levels for what they’re going to do to initiate plans on their end,” Robbins explains.​</p><h4>Engaging the Community</h4><p>It is becoming increasingly common for people to connect with public officials by asking questions or posting information online when an event occurs, and for expecting emergency operation agencies to be just as responsive by replying to feedback or answering a question. </p><p>The ASIS study found that 55 percent of police departments surveyed actively use social media in performance of their duties, and it’s no longer uncommon to see law enforcement officers taking tips and answering questions on their Facebook or Twitter pages. </p><p>Adamski says that he engages in what he calls social listening, which he compares to attending a town hall meeting: he takes a passive role and listens to conversations and concerns from the public, but can also answer questions or point someone in the right direction for accurate information.</p><p>Positive, regular interaction with the public via social media will also encourage people to trust and rely on that organization’s social media presence during a crisis. Adamski says that regardless of what people may ask on FEMA’s social media sites, it’s important that they see someone responding to their questions.</p><p>“Sometimes, we’ll have someone posting on our wall saying, ‘hey, this is what I did this weekend to get myself and my family prepared,’ and we’ll reply back to that person thanking them for sharing,” Adamski says. “It’s so they know they’re not just sharing their information to a hollow account that isn’t monitored.”​</p><h4>Managing Misinformation</h4><p>One of the toughest dilemmas society has is balancing the huge amounts of data available with the trustworthiness of that data. Multiple resources are needed to combine data streams that will ultimately improve data management. </p><p>Rumor control is a regular part of crisis management on social media, Adamski notes. “If we see a rumor, we’ll coordinate with folks at a joint field office that’s open and say, ‘Hey, we saw this online, is it true, is it not, is there some validity to it? Is it a complete blatant rumor or did someone get a part of it wrong?’”</p><p>Whether bad actors are maliciously spreading invalid information or a simple misunderstanding has spiraled out of control, FEMA’s goal is to run the rumor into the ground and make sure only accurate facts are being shared, especially considering how quickly information can travel across the Internet. During bigger emergencies, FEMA may create a subpage on its official website that people on social media can refer to and share. </p><p>During the Texas floods in May and June, FEMA created a subpage dedicated to the disaster to provide accurate, consistent information, Adamski says. It helped regional FEMA employees disseminate up-to-date information right away. For example, right after the worst of the flooding occurred, reports surfaced that people impersonating FEMA employees were trying to collect citizens’ personal information. The subpage helps people know how FEMA is interacting with the community and what steps to take next.</p><p>“We coordinate internally, we make sure we’re all on the same page, and we make sure we put the right information out there,” Adamski says. “Depending on the rumor, we may ask our partners to share the information—one message, multiple channels.” ​</p><h4>Challenges</h4><p>The ASIS study pinpointed three barriers that security professionals encounter when trying to develop a social media presence. These are a lack of personnel or time to work on social media, a lack of policies and guidelines, and concerns about trustworthiness of collected data. </p><p>“Look around and find out what companies are around you that are doing great things in communities and states,” says Robbins. “There’s a lot of activity, a lot of things going on that maybe companies aren’t aware of, that could be available bandwidth for them to piggyback on and could help get at some of those challenges that they are having in an expeditious manner.” He also recommends that private sector organizations apply to become members of FEMA’s NBEOC to take advantage of organization-to-organization emergency communications that can then be passed on to the public.</p><p>Social media is having a positive impact on emergency managers, but a clear reluctance exists to accept social media protocols wholesale. This technology is dependent on professional security managers and leaders who have the technical know-how to enhance operations internally, externally, and with key stakeholders. </p><p>Purposeful education programs are necessary if social media is going to be used wholesale in emergency management. The key to success is to ensure that those involved in presenting the information are experienced and knowledgeable. For example, the ASIS International Crisis Management and Business Continuity Council conducts an annual workshop on crisis management plan and program development. The council integrates social media techniques into the crisis communication phase of the workshop to help participants master the conceptual skills associated with this emerging technology.</p><p>The emergency operations industry should have a responsibility to create new methodologies, applications, and data strategies that will enhance overall contingency operations. Social media is making a positive difference in emergency operations, but has far to go before being completely transformed into common practice as a tool for emergency managers.</p><p>--<br></p><p><em><strong>James J. Leflar, Jr., CPP</strong>, CBCP (Certified Business Continuity Professional), MBCI (Member of the Business Continuity Institute), is a consultant for Zantech IT Services. Leflar is a former chair of the ASIS International Crisis Management and Business Continuity Council. He is also coauthor of Organizational Resilience: Managing the Risks of Disruptive Events—A Practitioner’s Guide. </em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465