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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Greipp-Scholarship-Recipients-Named.aspxGreipp Scholarship Recipients NamedGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-09-25T04:00:00ZShow Daily staff<p>​Six exceptional security industry professionals were selected to receive full-tuition scholarships offered through a partnership between the ASIS Foundation and the University of Phoenix.</p><p>The Jeff Greipp Secure Your Future Scholarship winners are William Crews, CPP; Luis Escamilla; Landon Johnson; Kelly Maddox; Clifford Mix; and Emily Sullivan, PSP. They will now be able to pursue an undergraduate or master’s degree program through the College of Security and Criminal Justice at the University of Phoenix.</p><p>Recipients may choose to pursue their degree at an on-ground campus or online. When applicable, persons holding an ASIS certification will receive college credit for this accomplishment.</p><p>Professionals from a cross-section of the security industry worldwide applied for this year’s scholarships. To be considered, applicants needed to meet all the admission requirements for the university; ASIS International membership was not a consideration. Once they begin their course work, the winners must maintain good standing throughout the term of their scholarship.</p><p>A committee comprised of members from the ASIS Foundation Board of Trustees, its Research Council, the ASIS Board of Directors, and the Professional Certification Board reviewed all applications and selected the recipients.</p><p>The scholarships honor the contributions and memory of ASIS member Jeffrey Greipp, JD. During three years of collaborative research and inquiry, Greipp was instrumental in creating an Enterprise Security Competency Model and presented at ASIS seminars on aligning academic curricula with industry needs.</p><p>Officials with whom he collaborated at both the University of Phoenix and the Foundation agree that Greipp’s leadership and vision will live on through this scholarship program.</p><p>Scholarship Recipients</p><p>• William Crews, CPP*</p><p>Master of Science in Administration of Justice and Security</p><p>• Luis Escamilla*</p><p>Master of Public Administration</p><p>• Landon Johnson*</p><p>Bachelor of Science in Security Management</p><p>• Kelly Maddox*</p><p>Bachelor of Science in Security Management</p><p>• Clifford Mix</p><p>Master of Public Administration</p><p>• Emily Sullivan, PSP*</p><p>Bachelor of Science </p><p><br></p><p>*ASIS member</p><p><br></p>

Public/Private Partnerships

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Interoperability-for-the-Safe-City-.aspxInteroperability for the Safe City <p>​​Today's cities often use video management systems or other platforms to view camera footage, protect citizens and property, analyze incidents, evaluate security, and determine appropriate responses to events like natural disasters, disruptions to public transit and other municipal services, and other threats to public safety. <br><br>Cities implementing this connected security approach are typically referred to as safe or smart cities. Most safe cities share a common infrastructure and operate using sensors and cameras over a shared municipal network. Synthesizing information from these sensors and the data from other devices through one interface, government officials and law enforcement are afforded a comprehensive view of a city's security.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Integrating the Many Parts of a Safe City</strong></p><p>There are operational challenges that accompany the many systems that are included in a safe city deployment. Interoperability continues to present one of the greatest challenges, particularly with video management systems, video recording devices, and cameras. The most common scenario is that municipalities have several management systems for city operations that were created by different manufacturers, each with proprietary interfaces for integration.<br><br>To connect their different systems together, cities often end up employing a single-vendor "build once and maintain forever" approach, in which the continuing cost for integration of systems becomes prohibitively expensive. In a world where technology and features change quickly, this approach is not practical because it severely limits an end user's ability to try new technology and different vendors' products and requires a substantial financial commitment to specific manufacturers and proprietary interfaces.<br></p><p><strong>Standards in Safe Cities </strong></p><p>ONVIF was founded in 2008 by Axis, Sony, and Bosch to create a global standard for the interface of IP-based physical security products. The organization was developed to provide increased flexibility and greater freedom of choice, so installers and end users can select interoperable products from a variety of different vendors. </p><p>Product interoperability is a driving force behind ONVIF. Interoperability is a simple concept: it is the ability of a product or system to work with another product or system, often from different brands made by different manufacturers. </p><p>ONVIF profiles are subsets of the overall ONVIF specification. They group together sets of related features to make product selection easier for end users, consultants, and systems integrators. Products must be conformant with one (or more) of ONVIF's specific profiles. </p><p><strong><em>ONVIF's current profiles are:</em></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><p><strong>Profile S</strong> for IP-based video and audio streaming, including:​<br></p><ul><li>Video and audio streaming<br></li><li>Pan-tilt-zoom control and relay output<br></li><li>Video configuration and multicast<br> </li></ul><p><strong>Profile G</strong> for edge storage and retrieval, including:</p><ul><li>Configure, request, and control recording from conformant devices<br></li><li>Receive audio and metadata stream<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile C</strong> for IP-based access control, including:</p><ul><li>Site information and configuration<br></li><li>Event and alarm management<br></li><li>Door access control<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile Q</strong> for easy configuration and advanced security, including:</p><ul><li>Out-of-box functionality<br></li><li>Easy, secure configuration<br></li><li>Secure client/device communications using transport layer security (TLS)<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile A</strong> for Broader Access Control Configuration</p><ul><li>Granting/revoking credentials, creating schedules, changing privileges<br></li><li>Enables integration between access control and IP video management system<br> <br></li></ul><p><strong>Profile T</strong> for Advanced Video Streaming is currently in draft form and is scheduled for initial release in 2018. </p><p>Standards, such as those from ONVIF, provide the common link between disparate components of safe city systems. Designed specifically to overcome the challenges in multi-vendor environments, ONVIF's common interfaces facilitate communication between technologies from different manufacturers and foster an interoperable system environment where system components can be used interchangeably, provided they conform to the ONVIF specification. </p><p>In 2014, ONVIF member company Meyertech helped the city of York, United Kingdom, deploy a safe city solution for the city's public spaces and transportation system. Using Meyertech video management software (VMS) and information management software, the city integrated IP cameras with the many legacy systems for its York Travel and Control Centre command center. </p><p>The city's control room monitors more than 150 cameras from different manufacturers in York, and city representatives reported an immediate impact on crime rates. The integration of legacy and new IP cameras with the new VMS, which interfaced with the information management software, was made possible through ONVIF's video specification. </p><p>A standardized approach for both file format and associated players, which is often a challenge in multi-vendor environments, is also provided by ONVIF, increasing the efficiency of the process and also adding the potential of including metadata—for example, data from an analytic, indicating number of objects, speed of objects, or even colors—in exported materials and reports. Standardized file formats include MPEG4, H.264, and, with Profile T, H.265, which are readable by many standard video players on the market, including Windows Media Player, VLC, DVD players, and many more. </p><p>ONVIF has also released an export file format specification that outlines a defined format for effective export of recorded material and forensics. These specifications together make it possible not only to integrate devices in multi-vendor video security system deployments in safe city environments, but also to offer a common export file format that can streamline post-event investigations where authorities are trying to react as quickly as possible to apprehend suspects or to defuse an ongoing situation.<strong> </strong></p><p>Another ONVIF member, Huawei, is considered a leader in smart city solutions. Huawei's video management system was used in Shanghai, China, as part of the Chinese Ministry of Public Security's safe cities construction initiative. One of the key challenges of the project was to integrate old and new technology. Huawei's VMS uses ONVIF to integrate cameras from manufacturers Dahua, Haikang, Axis, Sony, and others.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Multi-Discipline Standards</strong></p><p>A multi-discipline physical security standard that specifies parameters for video surveillance, access control, and other essential operations of a safe city command center would likely increase the prevalence of safe cities even further.</p><p>Many in the broader technology industry see standards as an important component in both safe cities and the Internet of things (IoT). The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and other standards groups are already working on IoT standards for technology-based industries, and some experts that global IoT standards will be introduced by the end of this year. </p><p>As standards and industries collaborate even further and establish minimum interoperability standards together, the need for a multi-discipline physical security standard will become more urgent. ONVIF envisions that all physical security systems will eventually have the same interfaces for interoperability, and the organization is dedicated to facilitating the work of its members in developing such a multi-discipline standard. </p><p><em>Jonathan Lewit is chairman of the ONVIF Communication Committee.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile--Felix-Giannini,-CPP.aspxCertification Profile: Felix Giannini, CPP<p>​Aside from six years in the U.S. Navy and a short stint working for a marine electronics company, “I’ve been self-employed my whole life,” says Felix Giannini, CPP, president of Lexco Security Systems in Fairfield, Connecticut. Intrigued by electronics as a teenager, he repaired audiovisual equipment and maintained a state-of-the-art video broadcast system while attending high school in Mamaroneck, New York. The two men who managed those operations had an alarm business on the side. “So in the 1970s I began installing security systems,” Giannini recalls. “I was trained by workmanship fanatics,” he says, “and that has influenced my whole career.” </p><p>Inzstilling professional workmanship practices and standards within the security installer community is extremely important to Giannini.  He believes that low standards—a lack of professional training among company owners, reduced educational requirements for licensed low-voltage electrical contractors, and scant funds for enforcement—lead to increased false alarms and a profession relegated to insignificance.</p><p>Giannini’s company focuses on large commercial, industrial, and institutional systems in the United States and overseas. He works with clients not only as a systems integrator but also as a consulting engineer and project manager. In those roles, he is aware of the potential for conflicts of interest. “If I design and manage a project, I have no business also installing,” he says. “The systems are designed and implemented in the best interests of the company, not the local vendors.”</p><p>Giannini has been a member of ASIS for 33 years. He was inspired to become a Certified Protection Professional® (CPP) in the 1980s while working as a consulting engineer for the Pitney Bowes Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut. During that time, he also designed a video conference system between the Riker’s Island Male House of Detention and the Bronx Criminal Court so hearings could be conducted over a microwave link. And he designed the first camera system for the Statue of Liberty.</p><p>Giannini earned a bachelor of science degree in fire protection systems engineering and is working on a master’s in emergency management. He applies educational concepts to assessing a company’s risks and hazards and designing mitigation strategies. “It’s not about the systems we install,” he says. “It’s about the people, the programs, and the training.”  </p><p>As a CPP, Giannini earns respect from client companies. “It says that I have an awareness level and that I speak their language,” he says. “It’s not just about selling cameras and monitors…it’s a much bigger picture and a lot more responsibility.”</p><p>Giannini has been vice chair of the Southern Connecticut Chapter for five years. He is proud of his chapter affiliation and has been instrumental in attracting speakers on such topics as social media and personal branding. He also helped create the first ASIS “Sister Chapter” relationship between his chapter and ASIS Italy.</p><p>Being a member of ASIS has been an “incredible benefit,” says Giannini, but not because he uses it as a vehicle to get work.” I don’t want to ever taint my membership,” he says. “It’s been an inspiration to be a professional, especially as a systems integrator.” </p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Road-to-Resilience.aspxThe Road to Resilience<p>Of course, 100RC had neither the resources nor staff to partner with 10,000 cities. But organization leaders argued that its 100 member cities could be models for institutionalizing resilience—that is, embedding resilience thinking into all the decisions city leaders make on a day-to-day basis, so that resilience is mainstreamed into the city government's policies and practices. Other cities could then adapt the model to fit their own parameters, and institutionalized resilience would spread throughout the world. </p><p>Toward this aim, 100RC recently released a report that discusses three case studies of institutionalizing resilience in New Orleans, Louisiana; Melbourne, Australia; and Semarang, Indonesia. </p><p>For all cities that 100RC works with, the organization provides funding to hire a new executive, the chief resilience officer (CRO). The group also advocates that member cities take the "10% Resilience Pledge," under which 10 percent of the city's annual budget goes toward resilience-building goals and projects. So far, nearly 30 member cities have taken the pledge, which has focused more than $5 billion toward resilience projects.</p><p>Of the three case study cities, New Orleans may be most known as a jurisdiction that has had to recover from repeated recent disasters, including Hurricanes Katrina and Isaac and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Given these experiences, New Orleans was one of the first cities to release a holistic resilience strategy, which connected resilience practices to almost all sectors of the city, including equity, energy, education, and emergency planning.</p><p>The strategy, Resilient New Orleans, has three underlying goals: strengthen the city's infrastructure, embrace the changing environment instead of resisting it, and create equal opportunities for all residents. </p><p>To better implement the strategy, New Orleans CRO Jeff Hebert was promoted to the level of first deputy mayor, and departments were joined to unite resilience planning with key sectors like water management, energy, transportation, coastal protection, and climate change.</p><p>Once this reconfiguration was complete, the city took several actions. It created the Gentilly Resilience District, which is aimed at reducing flood risk, slowing land subsidence, and encouraging neighborhood revitalization. The resilience district combines various approaches to water and land management to move forward on projects that will make the area more resilient. The city will also train some underemployed residents to work on the projects. </p><p>In addition, New Orleans leaders are developing and implementing new resilience design standards for public works and infrastructure, so that efforts to improve management of storm water and multi-modal transit systems will be included as standard design components.</p><p>Melbourne has its own challenges. Situated on the boundary of a hot inland area and a cool Southern Ocean, it can be subject to severe weather, such as gales, thunderstorms and hail, and large temperature drops. Governmentally, it is a "city of cities" made up of 32 local councils from around the region, so critical issues such as transportation, energy, and water systems are managed by various bodies, complicating decision making.</p><p>City leaders created the Resilient Melbourne Delivery Office, which will be hosted by the City of Melbourne for five years, jointly funded by both local and state governments. The office—an interdisciplinary team of at least 12 people, led by the CRO Toby Kent—is responsible for overseeing the delivery of the resilience strategy.</p><p>The strategy has four main goals: empower communities to take active responsibility for their own well-being; create sustainable infrastructure that will also promote social cohesion; provide diverse local employment opportunities to support an adaptable workforce; and ensure support for strong natural assets.</p><p>For Semarang, a coastal city in an archipelago, water is the main focus of sustainability. Factors like a rise in sea levels and coastal erosion have increased the negative impact of floods.</p><p>These impacts can challenge the city in many ways. Thus, for its resilience strategy, Semarang leaders focused on building capacities, including more economic opportunity, disaster risk management, integrated mobility, and sustainable water strategies.</p><p>In Indonesia, like many other Asian countries, the national government sets the goals and parameters for much of the development that takes place at the local level. Thus, Semarang leaders worked with members of the Indonesian Parliament to educate them on the city's existing resilience strategy, and to integrate the city's findings and insights into Indonesia's National Development Plan.</p><p>These coordination efforts bore fruit in the establishment of projects like a bus rapid transit system, which had strong support from the national government. The system has already been implemented in several main corridors and will be expanded. It is expected to offer insight and experience in cross-boundary resilience-related travel.</p><p>As 100RC cities look to institutionalize resiliency, the organization is also helping members improve their emergency management programs. The group is partnering with the Intermedix Corporation, which will help some member cities assess their current emergency management programs, and develop a blueprint for addressing gaps in the program and meeting resiliency goals.</p><p>"As new and complex problems and challenges arise, it's becoming more and more important for cities to look outside of their own organizations for the expertise and solutions required to meet and overcome these challenges," says Michael Berkowitz, president of 100RC. ​​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465