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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/March-2018-SM-Online.aspxMarch 2018 SM OnlineGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652018-03-01T05:00:00Z<h4>​​EUROPEAN UNION DATA RULES</h4><p>New EU data protection rules are set to go into effect in May 2018. The <a href="http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-room/20160407IPR21776/data-protection-reform-parliament-approves-new-rules-fit-for-the-digital-era">General Data Protection Regulation </a>(GDPR) is designed to give citizens control of their personal data, according to the European Parliament. Many businesses wrongly assume that the GDPR does not apply to them because they're not based in Europe. Others may not understand the scope of GDPR and are struggling to become compliant. The<a href="https://iapp.org/media/pdf/resource_center/IAPP-EY-Governance-Report-2017.pdf"> International Association of Privacy Professionals says</a> that the global 500 will spend $7.8 billion on GDPR compliance out of a combined annual revenue of $26 trillion. ​</p><h4>HARASSMENT RESOURCES</h4><p><a href="/Pages/Harassment-Prevention-.aspx">ASIS International </a>and SHRM, an organization for HR professionals, <a href="https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/policies/pages/cms_000554.aspx">offer resources</a> for <a href="https://www.asisonline.org/News/Press-Room/Press-Releases/2015/Pages/Investigations-ANSI-Standard-Released-By-ASIS-International.aspx%20%E2%80%8B">preventing harassment</a> and <a href="https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/how-to-guides/pages/howtoconductaninvestigation.aspx">conducting investigations</a>. ​</p><h4>TRANSACTION FRAUD </h4><p>Two-thirds of U.S. companies report an increase in fraud attempts over the past 12 months, <a href="http://ww2.idology.com/fifth-annual-fraud-report">according a study</a> issued by IDology, an Atlanta-based identity verification firm. The Fifth Annual Fraud Report: A New Landscape Emerges says that first-party fraud grew the most.​</p><h4>FIRE PROTECTION</h4><p>An October 2017 report from the <a href="https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Fire-statistics-and-reports/Research-reports/Other-research-topics/Total-Cost-of-Fire-in-the-United-States">National Fire Protection Association</a> breaks down the total cost of fire damage in the United States. The study is a "response to an increased demand for data to aid decision making in fire protection at the strategic and operational levels," according to the executive summary. ​</p><h4>TASERS </h4><p>In a December 2017 article, <a href="https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/usa-taser-jails/">Reuters identified 104 cases​</a> of prisoners who died after being shocked with Tasers.</p><h4>CORPORATE FRAUD</h4><p>Former Volkswagen executive Oliver Schmidt was sentenced to the maximum prison term of seven years and fined $400,000 for his role in the car manufacturer's<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/06/business/oliver-schmidt-volkswagen.html?_r=0https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/06/business/oliver-schmidt-volkswagen.html?_r=0"> emissions scandal​</a>.​ </p><h4>DATA BREACHES</h4><p>U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/2179?q=%7b%22search%22:%5b%22data+security+and+breach+notification+act%22%5d%7d&r=1">introduced a bill​</a> that would require companies to disclose data breaches within 30 days of becoming aware of the breach.</p><h4>DRUG TESTING</h4><p>Testing. The U.S. Department of Transportation <a href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-11-13/pdf/2017-24397.pdf">published a final rule​</a> that changes drug testing requirements and adds new substances to its drug testing panel. </p><h4>DISASTERS</h4><p>The United States has experienced 219 natural disasters since 1980 that reached or exceeded $1 billion in damage costs, according to <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322399412_1980-2017_Q4_-_US_Billion-dollar_weather_and_climate_disasters">a new analysis​</a> by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information.​ </p><h4>HARASSMENT</h4><p>What constitutes online harassment? And when should social media platforms intervene? <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/01/04/crossing-the-line-what-counts-as-online-harassment/">The Pew Research Center </a>found that Americans are divided over these questions.</p>

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/March-2018-SM-Online.aspx2018-03-01T05:00:00ZMarch 2018 SM Online
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/March-2018-Legal-Report-Resources.aspx2018-03-01T05:00:00ZMarch 2018 Legal Report Resources
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/February-2018-SM-Online.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZFebruary 2018 SM Online
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/February-2018-Legal-Report-Resources.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZFebruary 2018 Legal Report Resources
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Online-Records.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Online Records
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/February-2018-Legal-Report.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZFebruary 2018 Legal Report
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Commerce-in-China.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZCommerce in China
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Paved-with-Good-Intentions.aspx2018-02-01T05:00:00ZPaved with Good Intentions
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/January-2018-Legal-Report.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZJanuary 2018 Legal Report
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Humane-Policing.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Humane Policing
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-January-2018.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZSM Online January 2018
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/January-2018-Legal-Report-Resources.aspx2018-01-01T05:00:00ZJanuary 2018 Legal Report Resources
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-New-Social-World.aspx2017-12-01T05:00:00ZA New Social World
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/December-2017-Legal-Report.aspx2017-12-01T05:00:00ZDecember 2017 Legal Report
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/December-2017-Legal-Report-Resources.aspx2017-11-30T05:00:00ZDecember 2017 Legal Report Resources
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note-Fakery.aspx2017-11-01T04:00:00ZEditor's Note: Fakery
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/November-2017-Legal-Report.aspx2017-11-01T04:00:00ZNovember 2017 Legal Report
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/November-2017-Legal-Report-Resources.aspx2017-11-01T04:00:00ZNovember 2017 Legal Report Resources
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Unique-Threat-of-Insiders.aspx2017-10-01T04:00:00ZThe Unique Threat of Insiders
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/October-2017-Legal-Report---Record-Keeping,-Asset-Seizures,-and-More.aspx2017-10-01T04:00:00ZOctober 2017 Legal Report: Record Keeping, Asset Seizures, and More

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-January-2018.aspxSM Online January 2018<h4>​SCHOOL SAFETY</h4><p>Campus security nonprofit <a href="http://safehavensinternational.org/" target="_blank">Safe Havens International </a>offers free school safety resources on its website that can be used in K-12 schools as well as for higher learning institutions. Documents include a <a href="http://safehavensinternational.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/K12_School_Crisis_Site_Planning_Evaluation_Tool.pdf" target="_blank">safety plan evaluation tool</a>, a building design checklist, and a sample background investigation booklet for the hiring process. Safe Havens International works with schools on national and international levels in planning, coordinating, and evaluating a wide range of school crisis simulations.</p><h4>​BIODEFENSE</h4><p>Despite a call for a united biodefense approach, U.S. federal agencies continue to face challenges in sharing threat information, according to <a href="https://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-18-155" target="_blank">a GAO report​</a>. A <a href="http://www.biodefensestudy.org/biodefense-indicators" target="_blank">2016 panel on biodefense</a> contends that the U.S. vice president should lead the nation’s biodefense efforts.</p><h4>CYBER STRATEGY</h4><p>Despite awareness of cyber risks, many companies remain unprepared to deal with them, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ <a href="https://www.pwc.com/us/en/cybersecurity/information-security-survey.html" target="_blank">The Global State of Information Security Survey 2018.​</a></p><h4>CRISIS COMMUNICATIONS</h4><p>SmartRiskSolutions GmbH <a href="http://www.smartrisksolutions.de/assets/handbook-crisis-management-crisis-communication-terrorist-attack-active-shooter.pdf" target="_blank">published a handbook​</a> with advice for crisis management and crisis communications during a terrorist attack or active shooter incident. </p><h4>ASIS ACCOLADES</h4><p>Attendees at the ASIS 2017 voted the Pelco by Schneider Electric VideoXpert Professional Video Management System an ASIS Accolades People’s Choice Award winner. The Judges Choice awardee was the intelligent security robot from Cobalt Robotics. <a href="https://securityexpo.asisonline.org/expo/Pages/Accolades-.aspx" target="_blank">Read about all the winners.​</a></p><h4>WHISTLEBLOWING REWARDS</h4><p>Financial incentives can discourage whistleblower reporting, <a href="http://aaajournals.org/doi/abs/10.2308/ajpt-51663?code=aaan-site" target="_blank">according to a new study.​​</a></p><h4>FIRE SAFETY</h4><p>The <a href="https://www.csemag.com/fileadmin/content_files/cse/Consulting-Specifying_Engineer_2016_Fire_and_Life_Safety_Report.pdf" target="_blank">2016 Fire and Life Safety Study</a> from Consulting-Specifying Engineer surveyed its subscribers on what matters to them when selecting a fire and life safety system. ​</p><h4>EMAIL</h4><p>The U.S. Department of Homeland Security <a href="https://www.cyberscoop.com/dhs-dmarc-mandate/" target="_blank">issued a binding directive ​</a>that requires all U.S. agencies to adopt email and Web security guards against phishing and spam.</p><h4>BOMBING CONVICTION</h4><p><a href="https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdny/press-release/file/911021/download" target="_blank">A jury convicted</a> Ahmad Khan Rahimi on eight charges related to bombings in New York City on September 17, 2016, which injured more than 30 people and caused millions of dollars in property damage.</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/What's-New-in-Access-Control.aspxWhat's New in Access Control?<p>​Innovation in access control is quietly heating up. The industry is ready to implement innovations on a broad scale that have been just out of reach. Demand for virtual credentials is growing, facial recognition technology is both technically and economically feasible, and migration to the cloud is increasing—and increasingly beneficial. Over the next few years, market adoption of these advances will transform the ways security professionals operate and organizations benefit from their access control systems. </p><p><strong>Virtual credentials and mobile access technology</strong></p><p>The demand for virtual credentials and mobile access is intensifying, driven in part by younger members of the workforce who never go anywhere without their smartphones. Suffice to say, most employees wouldn't turn their cars around for a forgotten physical credential, but they'll certainly restart their commutes to collect forgotten smartphones. </p><p>The benefits are simple: convenience, compliance, and satisfaction of workforce demand. Everyone carries their phone, security professionals enhance their management capabilities, and employees can stay on the move. By including the credential in a mobile device, embedded in an app, organizations can also provide novel security capabilities, such as threat reporting and virtual photo ID. </p><p>The good news is that virtual credentials and mobile access technology have progressed to the point that they are easier to implement. Migration is straightforward, and implementation does not need to be all-or-nothing. Instead it can be taken in phases leading to an interim hybrid approach that includes physical and virtual credentials. </p><p><strong>Facial recognition</strong></p><p>Facial recognition offers the advantage of using existing access control rules, while reducing the friction of the user experience. </p><p>Picture a busy New York City high-rise office building with turnstiles that control access to an elevator lobby. There are always a few employees who have to search their pockets or backpacks to fish out a physical credential. Implementing facial recognition eliminates that bottleneck. The software scans people as they approach the turnstile and transmits a virtual credential to the access control system. Where a line might otherwise have formed, authorized employees now pass through turnstiles efficiently. </p><p>Facial recognition access control is no longer out of reach. Today's computing power can be combined with increasingly high-definition cameras and advanced recognition algorithms to bring the costs of implementation way down. </p><p><strong>Access control in the cloud</strong></p><p>The access control server is the nerve center of an access control system, but it no longer needs to physically exist. The increasing prevalence of the cloud eliminates that necessity. </p><p>Rather than dealing with the maintenance of a physical server, the speed and convenience of the cloud can handle everything a hardware box used to. This advance allows for increased scalability. And it provides flexibility in how security professionals purchase and use access control servers. Now the integrator or manufacturer can reduce end user burden and cost by ensuring that systems are backed up and updated remotely.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>What's next?</strong></p><p><strong></strong>Innovations in access control systems will drive the industry over the coming years. Novel credentials, such as mobile access and face recognition technology, combined with cloud-based servers will deliver an altogether improved experience. </p><p><em>John L. Moss is CEO of S2 Security.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Security-The-Risks-of-Arming-Security-Officers.aspxGuns and Security: The Risks of Arming Security Officers<p>​Cinemark was not to blame for the 2012 shooting at its Aurora, Colorado, movie theater where gunman James Holmes killed 12 people and injured 70 more. A jury did not find a <a href="http://www.denverpost.com/2016/05/19/cinemark-not-liable-for-aurora-theater-shooting-civil-jury-says/" target="_blank">lawyer’s argument compelling</a> that Cinemark should have provided armed security officers at the premier for <em>The Dark Knight Rises</em> because it was anticipating large crowds.</p><p>But should Cinemark have? Debates about armed security officers have flared up in the media and public discourse over the past few years. With the combination of a uniform and a firearm, armed officers may suggest a sense of security to the greater public, signaling that a business takes security and protection seriously. Others believe the presence of a gun merely stands to escalate dangerous situations.<br></p><p>The debate over the effect of firearms in such settings will not be settled anytime soon. But there are some things we do know about the consequences of arming security officers. Looking at it from an insurance perspective gives us a vantage to examine the risks and real-life consequences of arming security officers.<br></p><p><strong>Demand for Officers</strong><br></p><p>There are more than 1 million private security officers in the United States and about 650,000 police officers, according to the federal <a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes333051.htm" target="_blank">Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)</a>. After several years of steep increases in the number of security officers, the field is expected to grow by a steady 5 percent every year, the BLS estimates. Private security officers, more and more, are the face of security in the United States.</p><p>In some industries, such as healthcare, armed officers are a growing presence. Crime in healthcare facilities is a serious issue, so hospitals are looking to provide stronger security. The percentage of healthcare facilities that reported staffing armed officers in 2014 was almost double the rate four years prior, according to an <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/us/hospital-guns-mental-health.html" target="_blank"><em>article in The New York Times. </em><br></a></p><p>“To protect their corridors, 52 percent of medical centers reported that their security personnel carried handguns and 47 percent said they used Tasers,” the Times reported, citing a 2014 survey by the International Association for Healthcare Security and Safety.<br></p><p>As discussed in a previous <em></em><a href="/Pages/The-Dangers-of-Protection-What-Makes-a-Guard-Firm-Low--or-High-Risk.aspx" target="_blank"><em>Security Management </em>article,</a> there’s been a pronounced demand for insurance for armed security officers at legal marijuana facilities. We can always expect there to be demand for armed officers at government facilities, though the demand at schools has decreased slightly.<br></p><p><strong>Pros and Cons of Armed Officers</strong><br></p><p>Many people perceive armed security officers favorably as a deterrent against violence and an assurance that a violent incident can be quickly quelled. From a client’s standpoint, it offers a perception of higher protection.</p><p>Armed security officers are widely accepted as warranted in certain locations where the threat level matches the use of force. Government contracts and high-profile corporate executives are protected by highly trained armed officers. At banks, the risk of robbery also justifies an armed officer.<br></p><p>But from an insurance and risk standpoint, it is difficult to craft a convincing argument for armed security officers in many settings. The presence of a gun is not proven to de-escalate a situation in every environment, and it is unlikely to deter violent and determined individuals. The presence of an additional firearm—even in an officer’s hands—only stands to increase the risk of casualties. This is particularly true of public or crowded environments, like stadiums, schools, and restaurants.<br></p><p>By looking at insurance claims, it’s clear that when a security officer discharges his or her gun, the resulting claims are serious. There is a big difference between an officer using mace and an officer using a gun. Claims resulting from the use of firearms are likely to breach insurance policy limits, so firms employing armed security officers are wise to purchase higher limits of liability than firms not employing armed officers.<br></p><p>When someone is shot by a security officer, his—or his estate—will likely sue the business that contracted the officer. And the security firm and officer are going to be brought into the suit as well—no matter how well-trained the officer. If it goes to trial, it is very rare for a judge and jury to believe use of the weapon was justified. It is almost always perceived as excessive force.<br></p><p>The insurance marketplace for security firms is very small, and employing armed officers reduces the market even further. This means firms that provide armed officers will be paying a higher premium for less coverage; they will most likely be relegated to the surplus lines insurance market, which can mean more policy exclusions. Therefore, it’s important for the security firm to weigh the increased costs and policy limitations of taking on an armed contract.<br></p><p><strong>Mitigating Risks of Armed Officers</strong><br></p><p>If a client insists on armed officers, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of an officer discharging his or her weapon. </p><p>All officers should be checked against lists of individuals who are not permitted to carry firearms, in addition to the usual criminal background check. For armed posts, staff them with off-duty or former law enforcement officers; police receive extensive firearms training, as well as other training that helps them de-escalate challenging situations.<br></p><p>Consider local or state licensing requirements for armed security officers—they can vary by municipality. In some states, armed officers are not required to have special firearms training. For those states that do, officers and clients can be protected by ensuring that officers are trained to use firearms. Situational training, which is recommended for all officers, is particularly important for armed security officers as it teaches them to understand a judicious use of force for the environment they serve.<br></p><p>There are no easy, blanket answers to the question of whether to arm security officers. But looking at the risks and financial implications might help security leaders make decisions on a case-by-case basis.<br></p><p><em>Tory Brownyard is the president of Brownyard Group, a program administrator that pioneered liability insurance for security guard firms more than 60 years ago. He can be reached at tbrownyard@brownyard.com or 1-800-645-5820.</em><br></p><p><br></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465