CSO/Leadership

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Wharton-ASIS-Program-Prepares-Executives-for-Challenges.aspxWharton/ASIS Program Prepares Executives for ChallengesGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-09-25T04:00:00Z<p>​The prestigious Wharton/ASIS Program for Security Executives is a six-day intensive program designed for chief security officers, as well as those next in line for future leadership positions. Senior managers who are responsible for representing a business case for security will also benefit from the program.</p><p>The next iteration of this highly sought-after certificate program will be held next month from Sunday, October 15, to Friday, October 20. The cost is $10,500, which includes course materials, lodging, and all meals.</p><p>The Program for Security Executives: Making the Case for Security is sponsored jointly by ASIS International and Wharton Executive Education. Held at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, nearly 300 executives from top-tier multinationals, government agencies, and foundations have attended the program.</p><p>Classes are led by renowned members of the Wharton faculty. In-depth discussions focus on strategic thinking, leadership, managing people, negotiation, essentials of finance, and the fundamentals of marketing.</p><p>Sessions are designed to enable participants to master the following:</p><p>• Understand the core concepts of business to broaden managerial and strategic perspectives, enhance business instincts, and sharpen the ability to tackle management challenges.</p><p>• Communicate a clear business case for investments in organizational security policy.</p><p>• Present strategies to the C-suite so executives listen and approve top recommendations.</p><p>Taking the next step in security’s upward mobility requires working more effectively with corporate peers and relaying the bottom-line affects of security decisions to enterprise-wide leaders. Graduates of this program are able to apply the knowledge gained toward advancing their organization’s objectives.</p><p>The intense nature and structure of the program supports and encourages inter-relationships with classmates, thereby extending professionals networks beyond their days in Philadelphia.</p><p>Make plans to attend the October 2017 program, now in its 15th year of offering a unique educational opportunity to security leaders. Download a program overview, program details, and an application at asisonline.org. Or, stop by the ASIS Hub at booth 1613 in the Exhibit Hall to speak to expertsabout the program.</p>

CSO/Leadership

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Wharton-ASIS-Program-Prepares-Executives-for-Challenges.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZWharton/ASIS Program Prepares Executives for Challenges
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-CPP-Turns-40.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZThe CPP Turns 40
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/New-Strategic-Plan-to-Guide-Direction-of-the-Society.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZNew Strategic Plan to Guide Direction of the Society
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cross-Award-Winners-Named.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCross Award Winners Named
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Marquez-Memorial-Honoree-Named-Tonight.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZMarquez Memorial Honoree Named Tonight
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Hiding-Body-Art-During-Interviews-Then-Revealing-It-on-the-Job.aspx2017-09-13T04:00:00ZIs Hiding Body Art During Interviews, Then Revealing It on the Job, Deceptive?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Less-is-More.-A-KISS-Approach-to-ESRM.aspx2017-09-12T04:00:00ZLess is More: A KISS Approach to ESRM
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Emotional.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZEditor's Note: Emotional
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile--Felix-Giannini,-CPP.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Felix Giannini, CPP
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Calm-in-the-Crucible.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZCalm in the Crucible
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Professional-Path.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZA Professional Path
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/LA-IMPORTANCIA-DE-UNA-FUSIÓN.aspx2017-08-24T04:00:00ZLA IMPORTANCIA DE UNA FUSIÓN
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/New-Employee-Onboarding-Guide.aspx2017-08-09T04:00:00ZNew Employee Onboarding Guide
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Truth-and-Lies.aspx2017-08-01T04:00:00ZEditor's Note: Truth and Lies
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Chuck-McCormick,-PSP.aspx2017-08-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Chuck McCormick, PSP
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Harassment-Prevention-.aspx2017-08-01T04:00:00ZHarassment Prevention
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Mentor-Y-Yo.aspx2017-07-20T04:00:00ZMentor Y Yo
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Changing-Course-for-Success.aspx2017-07-10T04:00:00ZChanging Course for Corporate Success
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---A-Stronger-Web.aspx2017-07-01T04:00:00ZEditor's Note: A Stronger Web
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Malcolm-Reid,-CPP.aspx2017-07-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Malcolm Reid, CPP

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Interoperability-for-the-Safe-City-.aspxInteroperability for the Safe City <p>​​Today's cities often use video management systems or other platforms to view camera footage, protect citizens and property, analyze incidents, evaluate security, and determine appropriate responses to events like natural disasters, disruptions to public transit and other municipal services, and other threats to public safety. <br><br>Cities implementing this connected security approach are typically referred to as safe or smart cities. Most safe cities share a common infrastructure and operate using sensors and cameras over a shared municipal network. Synthesizing information from these sensors and the data from other devices through one interface, government officials and law enforcement are afforded a comprehensive view of a city's security.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Integrating the Many Parts of a Safe City</strong></p><p>There are operational challenges that accompany the many systems that are included in a safe city deployment. Interoperability continues to present one of the greatest challenges, particularly with video management systems, video recording devices, and cameras. The most common scenario is that municipalities have several management systems for city operations that were created by different manufacturers, each with proprietary interfaces for integration.<br><br>To connect their different systems together, cities often end up employing a single-vendor "build once and maintain forever" approach, in which the continuing cost for integration of systems becomes prohibitively expensive. In a world where technology and features change quickly, this approach is not practical because it severely limits an end user's ability to try new technology and different vendors' products and requires a substantial financial commitment to specific manufacturers and proprietary interfaces.<br></p><p><strong>Standards in Safe Cities </strong></p><p>ONVIF was founded in 2008 by Axis, Sony, and Bosch to create a global standard for the interface of IP-based physical security products. The organization was developed to provide increased flexibility and greater freedom of choice, so installers and end users can select interoperable products from a variety of different vendors. </p><p>Product interoperability is a driving force behind ONVIF. Interoperability is a simple concept: it is the ability of a product or system to work with another product or system, often from different brands made by different manufacturers. </p><p>ONVIF profiles are subsets of the overall ONVIF specification. They group together sets of related features to make product selection easier for end users, consultants, and systems integrators. Products must be conformant with one (or more) of ONVIF's specific profiles. </p><p><strong><em>ONVIF's current profiles are:</em></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><p><strong>Profile S</strong> for IP-based video and audio streaming, including:​<br></p><ul><li>Video and audio streaming<br></li><li>Pan-tilt-zoom control and relay output<br></li><li>Video configuration and multicast<br> </li></ul><p><strong>Profile G</strong> for edge storage and retrieval, including:</p><ul><li>Configure, request, and control recording from conformant devices<br></li><li>Receive audio and metadata stream<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile C</strong> for IP-based access control, including:</p><ul><li>Site information and configuration<br></li><li>Event and alarm management<br></li><li>Door access control<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile Q</strong> for easy configuration and advanced security, including:</p><ul><li>Out-of-box functionality<br></li><li>Easy, secure configuration<br></li><li>Secure client/device communications using transport layer security (TLS)<br></li></ul><p><strong><br>Profile A</strong> for Broader Access Control Configuration</p><ul><li>Granting/revoking credentials, creating schedules, changing privileges<br></li><li>Enables integration between access control and IP video management system<br> <br></li></ul><p><strong>Profile T</strong> for Advanced Video Streaming is currently in draft form and is scheduled for initial release in 2018. </p><p>Standards, such as those from ONVIF, provide the common link between disparate components of safe city systems. Designed specifically to overcome the challenges in multi-vendor environments, ONVIF's common interfaces facilitate communication between technologies from different manufacturers and foster an interoperable system environment where system components can be used interchangeably, provided they conform to the ONVIF specification. </p><p>In 2014, ONVIF member company Meyertech helped the city of York, United Kingdom, deploy a safe city solution for the city's public spaces and transportation system. Using Meyertech video management software (VMS) and information management software, the city integrated IP cameras with the many legacy systems for its York Travel and Control Centre command center. </p><p>The city's control room monitors more than 150 cameras from different manufacturers in York, and city representatives reported an immediate impact on crime rates. The integration of legacy and new IP cameras with the new VMS, which interfaced with the information management software, was made possible through ONVIF's video specification. </p><p>A standardized approach for both file format and associated players, which is often a challenge in multi-vendor environments, is also provided by ONVIF, increasing the efficiency of the process and also adding the potential of including metadata—for example, data from an analytic, indicating number of objects, speed of objects, or even colors—in exported materials and reports. Standardized file formats include MPEG4, H.264, and, with Profile T, H.265, which are readable by many standard video players on the market, including Windows Media Player, VLC, DVD players, and many more. </p><p>ONVIF has also released an export file format specification that outlines a defined format for effective export of recorded material and forensics. These specifications together make it possible not only to integrate devices in multi-vendor video security system deployments in safe city environments, but also to offer a common export file format that can streamline post-event investigations where authorities are trying to react as quickly as possible to apprehend suspects or to defuse an ongoing situation.<strong> </strong></p><p>Another ONVIF member, Huawei, is considered a leader in smart city solutions. Huawei's video management system was used in Shanghai, China, as part of the Chinese Ministry of Public Security's safe cities construction initiative. One of the key challenges of the project was to integrate old and new technology. Huawei's VMS uses ONVIF to integrate cameras from manufacturers Dahua, Haikang, Axis, Sony, and others.<strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Multi-Discipline Standards</strong></p><p>A multi-discipline physical security standard that specifies parameters for video surveillance, access control, and other essential operations of a safe city command center would likely increase the prevalence of safe cities even further.</p><p>Many in the broader technology industry see standards as an important component in both safe cities and the Internet of things (IoT). The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and other standards groups are already working on IoT standards for technology-based industries, and some experts that global IoT standards will be introduced by the end of this year. </p><p>As standards and industries collaborate even further and establish minimum interoperability standards together, the need for a multi-discipline physical security standard will become more urgent. ONVIF envisions that all physical security systems will eventually have the same interfaces for interoperability, and the organization is dedicated to facilitating the work of its members in developing such a multi-discipline standard. </p><p><em>Jonathan Lewit is chairman of the ONVIF Communication Committee.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile--Felix-Giannini,-CPP.aspxCertification Profile: Felix Giannini, CPP<p>​Aside from six years in the U.S. Navy and a short stint working for a marine electronics company, “I’ve been self-employed my whole life,” says Felix Giannini, CPP, president of Lexco Security Systems in Fairfield, Connecticut. Intrigued by electronics as a teenager, he repaired audiovisual equipment and maintained a state-of-the-art video broadcast system while attending high school in Mamaroneck, New York. The two men who managed those operations had an alarm business on the side. “So in the 1970s I began installing security systems,” Giannini recalls. “I was trained by workmanship fanatics,” he says, “and that has influenced my whole career.” </p><p>Inzstilling professional workmanship practices and standards within the security installer community is extremely important to Giannini.  He believes that low standards—a lack of professional training among company owners, reduced educational requirements for licensed low-voltage electrical contractors, and scant funds for enforcement—lead to increased false alarms and a profession relegated to insignificance.</p><p>Giannini’s company focuses on large commercial, industrial, and institutional systems in the United States and overseas. He works with clients not only as a systems integrator but also as a consulting engineer and project manager. In those roles, he is aware of the potential for conflicts of interest. “If I design and manage a project, I have no business also installing,” he says. “The systems are designed and implemented in the best interests of the company, not the local vendors.”</p><p>Giannini has been a member of ASIS for 33 years. He was inspired to become a Certified Protection Professional® (CPP) in the 1980s while working as a consulting engineer for the Pitney Bowes Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut. During that time, he also designed a video conference system between the Riker’s Island Male House of Detention and the Bronx Criminal Court so hearings could be conducted over a microwave link. And he designed the first camera system for the Statue of Liberty.</p><p>Giannini earned a bachelor of science degree in fire protection systems engineering and is working on a master’s in emergency management. He applies educational concepts to assessing a company’s risks and hazards and designing mitigation strategies. “It’s not about the systems we install,” he says. “It’s about the people, the programs, and the training.”  </p><p>As a CPP, Giannini earns respect from client companies. “It says that I have an awareness level and that I speak their language,” he says. “It’s not just about selling cameras and monitors…it’s a much bigger picture and a lot more responsibility.”</p><p>Giannini has been vice chair of the Southern Connecticut Chapter for five years. He is proud of his chapter affiliation and has been instrumental in attracting speakers on such topics as social media and personal branding. He also helped create the first ASIS “Sister Chapter” relationship between his chapter and ASIS Italy.</p><p>Being a member of ASIS has been an “incredible benefit,” says Giannini, but not because he uses it as a vehicle to get work.” I don’t want to ever taint my membership,” he says. “It’s been an inspiration to be a professional, especially as a systems integrator.” </p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Soft-Target-Trends.aspxSoft Target Trends<p>When most people think of Orlando, Florida, Walt Disney World Resort comes to mind. The world-renowned theme park makes Orlando the second most popular travel destination in the United States. But there is much more to the city than Mickey and Minnie Mouse. </p><p>Beyond the complex infrastructure that supports Orlando’s 2.3 million citizens, the city is filled with parks and wildlife, the largest university in the country, and a vast hospitality industry that includes more than 118,000 hotel rooms. And International Drive, an 11-mile thoroughfare through the city, is home to attractions such as Universal Orlando Resort, SeaWorld Orlando, and the Orange County Convention Center, the site of ASIS International’s 62nd Annual Seminar and Exhibits this month. </p><p>Hospitality goes hand-in-hand with security in Orlando, where local businesses and attractions see a constant flow of tourists from all over the world. And at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, which hosts events ranging from Broadway shows to concerts to community education and events, a new security director is changing the culture of theater to keep performers, staff, and visitors safe.​</p><h4>The Living Room of the City</h4><p>Open since November 2014, the Dr. Phillips Center spans two blocks and is home to a 2,700-seat main stage, a 300-seat theater, and the Dr. Phillips Center Florida Hospital School of the Arts. The building’s striking architecture, which includes a canopy roof, vast overhang, and a façade made almost entirely of glass, stretches across two blocks and is complemented by a front lawn and plaza.</p><p>After the June 11 shooting at Pulse nightclub less than two miles south of the theater, that lawn became the city’s memorial. Days after the shooting, the Dr. Phillips Center plaza, normally used for small concerts or events, hosted Orlando’s first public vigil. A makeshift memorial was established on the lawn, and dozens of mourners visited for weeks after the attack.</p><p>Chris Savard, a retired member of the Orlando Police Department, started as the center’s director of security in December, shortly after terrorists killed dozens and injured hundreds in attacks on soft targets in Paris. Prior to Savard, the center had no security director. Coming from a law enforcement background to the theater industry was a challenging transition, he says. </p><p>“Before I came here, I was with an FBI terrorism task force,” Savard says. “Bringing those ideologies here to the performing arts world, it’s just a different culture. Saying ‘you will do security, this is the way it is’ doesn’t work. You have to ease into it.”</p><p>The Dr. Phillips Center was up and running for a year before Savard started, so he had to focus on strategic changes to improve security: “The building is already built, so we need to figure out what else we can do,” he says. One point of concern was an overhang above the valet line right at the main entrance. Situated above the overhang is a glass-walled private donor lounge, and Savard notes that anyone could have driven up to the main entrance under the overhang and set off a bomb, causing maximum damage. “It was a serious chokepoint,” he explains, “and the building was designed before ISIS took off, so there wasn’t much we could do about the overhang.”</p><p>Instead, he shifted the valet drop-off point, manned by off-duty police officers, further away from the building. “We’ve got some people saying, ‘Hey, I’m a donor and I don’t want to walk half a block to come to the building, I want to park my vehicle here, get out, and be in the air conditioning.’ It’s a tough process, but it’s a work in progress. Most people have not had an issue whatsoever in regards to what we’ve implemented.”</p><p>Savard also switched up the use of off-duty police officers in front of the Dr. Phillips Center. He notes that it can be costly to hire off-duty police officers, who were used for traffic control before he became the security director, so he reduced the number of officers used and stationed them closer to the building. He also uses a K-9 officer, who can quickly assess a stopped or abandoned vehicle on the spot. </p><p>“When you pull into the facility, you see an Orlando Police Department K-9 officer SUV,” Savard explains. “We brought two other valet officers closer to the building, so in any given area you have at least four police cars or motorcycles that are readily available. We wanted to get them closer so it was more of a presence, a deterrent.” The exact drop-off location is constantly changing to keep people on their toes, he adds.</p><p>The Dr. Phillips Center was already using Andy Frain Services, which provides uniformed officers to patrol the center around the clock. Annette DuBose manages the contracted officers. </p><p>When he started in December, Savard says he was surprised that no bag checks were conducted. When he brought up the possibility of doing bag checks, there was some initial pushback—it’s uncommon for theater centers to perform any type of bag check. “In the performing arts world, this was a big deal,” Savard says. “You have some high-dollar clientele coming in, and not a lot of people want to be inconvenienced like that.”</p><p>When Savard worked with DuBose and her officers to implement bag checks, he said everyone was astonished at what the officers were finding. “I was actually shocked at what people want to bring in,” Savard says. “Guns, knives, bullets. I’ve got 25-plus years of being in law enforcement, and seeing what people bring in…it’s a Carole King musical! Why are you bringing your pepper spray?”</p><p>Savard acknowledges that the fact that Florida allows concealed carry makes bag checks mandatory—and tricky. As a private entity, the Dr. Phillips Center can prohibit guns, but that doesn’t stop people from trying to bring them in, he notes. The Andy Frain officers have done a great job at kindly but firmly asking patrons to take their guns back to their cars, Savard says—and hav­ing a police officer nearby helps when it comes to argumentative visitors.​</p><h4>Culture, Community, and Customer Service</h4><p>There have been more than 300 performances since the Dr. Phillips Center opened, and with two stages, the plaza, classrooms, and event spaces, there can be five or six events going on at once. </p><p>“This is definitely a soft target here in Orlando,” Savard notes. “With our planned expansion, we can have 5,000 people in here at one time. What a target—doing something in downtown Orlando to a performing arts center.”</p><p>The contract officers and off-duty police carry out the core of the security- related responsibilities, but Savard has also brought in volunteers to augment the security presence. As a nonprofit theater, the Dr. Phillips Center has a large number of “very passionate” volunteers—there are around 50 at each show, he says. </p><p>The volunteers primarily provide customer service, but Savard says he wants them to have a security mindset, as well—“the more eyes, the better.” He teaches them basic behavioral assessment techniques and trends they should look for. </p><p>“You know the guy touching his lower back, does he have a back brace on or is he trying to keep the gun in his waistband from showing?” Savard says. “Why is that person out there videotaping where people are being dropped off and parking their cars? Is it a bad guy who wants to do something?”</p><p>All 85 staffers at the Dr. Phillips Center have taken active shooter training classes, and self-defense classes are offered as well. Savard tries to stress situational awareness to all staff, whether they work in security or not. </p><p>“One of the things I really want to do is get that active shooter mindset into this environment, because this is the type of environment where it’s going to happen,” Savard explains. “It’s all over the news.”</p><p>Once a month, Savard and six other theater security directors talk on the phone about the trends and threats they are seeing, as well as the challenges with integrating security into the performing arts world. </p><p>“Nobody wanted the cops inside the building at all, because it looked too militant,” Savard says. “And then we had Paris, and things changed. With my background coming in, I said ‘Listen, people want to see the cops.’” </p><p>Beyond the challenge of changing the culture at the Dr. Phillips Center, Savard says he hopes security can become a higher priority at performing arts centers across the country. The Dr. Phillips Center is one of more than two dozen theaters that host Broadway Across America shows, and Savard invited the organization’s leaders to attend an active shooter training at the facility last month. </p><p>“There’s a culture in the performing arts that everything’s fine, and unfortu­nately we know there are bad people out there that want to do bad things to soft targets right now,” Savard says. “The whole idea is to be a little more vigilant in regards to protecting these soft targets.”</p><p>Savard says he hopes to make wanding another new norm at performing arts centers. There have already been a number of instances where a guest gets past security officers with a gun hidden under a baggy Cuban-style shirt. “I’ll hear that report of a gun in the building, and the hair stands up on the back of my neck,” Savard says. “It’s a never- ending goal to continue to get better and better every time. We’re not going to get it right every time, but hopefully the majority of the time.”</p><p>The Dr. Phillips Center is also moving forward with the construction of a new 1,700-seat acoustic theater, which will be completed within the next few years. The expansion allows the center to host three shows at one time—not including events in private rooms or on the plaza. Savard is already making plans for better video surveillance and increasing security staff once the new theater is built.</p><p>“We really try to make sure that every­body who comes into the building, whether or not they’re employed here, is a guest at the building, and we want to make sure that it’s a great experience, not only from the performance but their safety,” according to Savard. “It’s about keeping the bad guys out, but it’s also that you feel really safe once you’re in here.” </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465