CSO/Leadership

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-June-2017.aspxSM Online June 2017GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-06-01T04:00:00Z<h4>​GRID SECURITY </h4><p>For the first time in history, hackers used a cyberattack to knock out a portion of a nation’s electric grid. In <em><a href="http://www.nerc.com/pa/CI/ESISAC/Documents/E-ISAC_SANS_Ukraine_DUC_18Mar2016.pdf" target="_blank">Analysis of the Cyber Attack on the Ukrainian Power Grid​</a></em>, experts from SANS and the Electricity Information and Analysis Center explain how the hackers carried out the attack. Another report, <em><a href="https://www.boozallen.com/content/dam/boozallen/documents/2016/09/ukraine-report-when-the-lights-went-out.pdf" target="_blank">When the Lights Went Out: A Comprehensive Review of the 2015 Attacks on Ukrainian Critical Infrastructure</a></em>, this one from Booz Allen Hamilton, analyzes the same attack and suggests ways to avoid another one.</p><h4>CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE</h4><p>A new report from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology—<em><a href="https://internetpolicy.mit.edu/reports/Report-IPRI-CIS-CriticalInfrastructure-2017-Brenner.pdf" target="_blank">Keeping America Safe: Toward More Secure Networks for Critical Sectors​</a></em>—identifies eight challenges with recommendations for increased infrastructure cybersecurity.</p><h4>STEMMING RADICALIZATION </h4><p>A bipartisan study group convened by the Washington Institute, a think tank dedicated to U.S. Middle East policy, recently issued a report which examines the question: Can the U.S. government build a system of intervention where individuals could be identified and redirected away from extremism before they commit an act of terror? The report, <a href="http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/view/defeating-ideologically-inspired-violent-extremism" target="_blank"><em>Defeating Ideologically Inspired Extremism: A Strategy to Build Strong Communities and Protect the U.S. Homeland</em></a>, looks at alternatives. </p><h4>AIRPORT SECURITY</h4><p>In its recent report,<em><a href="https://homeland.house.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Americas-Airports-The-Threat-From-Within.pdf" target="_blank"> America’s Airports: The Threat from Within</a></em>, the U.S. House of Representatives’ Homeland Security Committee pulls no punches in a clear conclusion: “America’s airports and aircraft remain vulnerable to attack and exploitation by nefarious individuals.” ​</p><h4>BORDER PROTECTION </h4><p>Two government reports delve into<a href="https://www.oig.dhs.gov/assets/Mgmt/2017/OIG-17-39-Feb17.pdf" target="_blank"> current border security efforts</a> and <a href="http://www.gao.gov/assets/690/682838.pdf" target="_blank">what can be learned from them​</a> as the new U.S. administration moves to build a wall between the United States and Mexico. </p><h4>VIGILANCE FATIGUE</h4><p>To effectively respond to alerts, security operators must pay attention for sustained periods of time without getting so tired that job performance decreases. But are vigilance and fatigue two sides of the same coin? That was the topic of a panel at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 2016 Annual Meeting, which <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/307944643_Vigilance_and_Fatigue_A_Double_Sided_Coin" target="_blank">published its findings in a paper​</a>. </p><h4>INCENTIVES</h4><p>Misaligned incentives between hackers and defenders are making companies more vulnerable to cyberattacks, according to <em><a href="/ASIS%20SM%20Documents/Intel%20Security_Tilting%20the%20Playing%20Field%20Report%20(002).pdf">Tilting the Playing Field: How Misaligned Incentives Work Against Cybersecurity from Intel</a>​</em>.</p><h4>HUMAN RIGHTS </h4><p>The U.K. House of Commons <a href="https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/bills/cbill/2016-2017/0097/amend/criminal_daily_rep_0220.1-7.html" target="_blank">passed a bill ​</a>that expands the U.K. government’s powers to freeze human rights violators’ assets.</p><h4>HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT</h4><p>Hugs in the workplace may create a sexually hostile work environment under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, <a href="http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2017/02/23/14-17341.pdf" target="_blank">a U.S. federal court of appeals ruled​</a>. </p><h4>SAFETY INSPECTIONS</h4><p>A global oil and gas production services provider <a href="https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/company-pay-95-million-false-reporting-safety-inspections-and-clean-water-act-violations-led" target="_blank">will pay $9 million for falsifying safety inspections​</a> and violating the U.S. Clean Water Act.</p><h4>CYBER SPENDING </h4><p><a href="https://www.nuix.com/white-papers/black-report" target="_blank">A survey from Nuix</a> finds that 42 percent of self-identified hackers and penetration testers consider data hygiene and information governance the least effective places to spend a security budget.</p>

CSO/Leadership

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-June-2017.aspx2017-06-01T04:00:00ZSM Online June 2017
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Bully-for-You-.aspx2017-05-01T04:00:00ZBully for You?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Flying-Solo.aspx2017-05-01T04:00:00ZFlying Solo
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Nicholas-G.-Breiner.aspx2017-05-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Nicholas G. Breiner
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/How-Organizations-Prompt-Different-Levels-of-Engagement.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZHow Organizations Prompt Different Levels of Engagement
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Operational-Policy-Making.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZBook Review: Operational Policy Making
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cultivate-Engagement.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZCultivate Engagement
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-April-2017.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZSM Online April 2017
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Servant-Leader-Counterpoint---President-Trump.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZServant Leader Counterpoint: President Trump
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Trigger.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZEditor's Note: Trigger
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/March-2017-Letters-to-the-Editor.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZMarch 2017 Letters to the Editor
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Security-Culture.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Security Culture
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Art-of-Servant-Leadership.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZThe Art of Servant Leadership
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Running-on-Empty.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZRunning on Empty
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Interaction.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZEditor's Note: Interaction
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-News-February-2017.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZJack Lichtenstein Leaves ASIS, Offers Insights on Trump
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Business-Continuity.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Business Continuity
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Day-to-Day-Tactics.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZDay-to-Day Tactics
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Take-Time.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZEditor's Note: Take Time
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-January-2017.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZSM Online January 2017

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Flying-Solo.aspxFlying Solo<p>​Senior executives routinely travel the globe without security and rarely are there any incidents of concern, but when things go wrong from a protective security perspective, they usually go wrong quickly and can snowball into disaster. </p><p>Most failures stem from a lack of proper advance work, logistical foul-ups, and lost luggage. Robust protective intelligence and countersurveillance programs, along with comprehensive threat assessments, can greatly reduce the risk to executives who travel. But when a security detail will not be included in the trip, basic training and preparedness for those executives can go a long way.</p><p>Many executives want to run under the radar, whether they are attending a meeting on the other side of town or traveling around the world. Few CEOs travel surrounded by visible security personnel with earpieces and shoulder holsters because the optics are deemed bad for business. Few executives need or seek that level of security. And although it’s rare for an armed robbery or a Kardashian-style hotel invasion to occur, it’s on every protection officer’s mind.</p><p>A more thoughtful approach to protection for senior government personnel, executives, and high-net-worth families was created by a group of former government agents in the private sector. They adopted a different model of protection, focused heavily on protective intelligence and countersurveillance. </p><p>The model is now used by many Fortune 500 companies and takes a nuanced approach to empower the executives themselves. Even though security staff may not be in tow on any given trip, there are several key principles that executives can practice that will dramatically increase their level of safety and security wherever they are in the world. ​</p><h4>Situational Awareness</h4><p>With enough will and discipline, executives can use situational awareness to stay ahead of threats while traveling. To successfully practice situational awareness, executives must be mindful of a few basic facts. </p><p>First, they must acknowledge that a threat exists, because bad things do happen to good people. Executives traveling solo must also take care of themselves because they are ultimately responsible for their own safety and welfare. Finally, they must heed their instincts. If something doesn’t look or seem right, chances are it’s not, and executives need to be comfortable identifying and acting on that intuition. </p><p>When discussing situational awareness with an executive, it is important to stress that this does not mean being paranoid or obsessively concerned about security. Still, there are periods where enhanced awareness levels are needed. </p><p>Solo executives can learn to practice enhanced observation skills with simple exercises, like paying attention to the cars behind them in traffic, or by challenging themselves to see if they can remember automobile license plate letters and numbers. </p><p>One best practice is to have executives pay special attention to their departure points and destinations, scanning the area with an eye for vehicles and people that could be watching. If the same vehicle, bicycle, or person is spotted over time and distance, someone may be conducting surveillance. </p><p>For example, a blue van glimpsed at the point of departure and then seen later near a business meeting means someone could be watching. Not all watchers are criminals or possible kidnappers—in some locations, the watchers could be state security services or private detectives hired by competitors.​</p><h4>Countersurveillance</h4><p>Burglars, kidnappers, assassins, and any manner of criminals all follow an attack cycle, including some level of preoperational surveillance. Attacks don’t happen in a vacuum. In most cases, criminal and terrorist surveillance tradecraft is the least well-developed skill in the hostile operator’s toolbox. </p><p>When persons with hostile intentions are engaged in preoperational surveillance, they are also highly vulnerable to detection. Professional countersurveillance teams are trained to recognize operatives conducting surveillance on a target. However, an individual practicing good situational awareness can often spot preoperational surveillance on his or her own, especially if the surveillant is sloppy, as many are. </p><p>If suspects realize that their surveillance efforts have been detected, they will become anxious and may decide against acting—or at least redirect their attention to an easier target. The detection also lets the executive know he or she must take further protective steps, such as changing routes or vehicles, switching hotel rooms, notifying local authorities or staff, alerting corporate headquarters, and calling for backup. Monitoring for surveillance needs to be part of executives’ ongoing situational awareness practice. </p><p>One terrorist plot uncovered in 2003 revealed how an al Qaeda cell used preoperational surveillance when targeting financial institutions in Washington, D.C.; New York City; Newark, New Jersey; and potential targets in Singapore. In one instance, several operatives sat in a Starbucks cafe across from their intended target, recording information like security measures and building access. Their notes, videos, and practices were uncovered when the terrorist cell was broken up by authorities­—fortunately before an attack took place.​</p><h4>Fire Safety</h4><p>While traveling, executives may obsess over the potential threat posed by terrorist attacks, political violence, or other incidents that result in news headlines, but they tend to discount the less exciting but more likely threat posed by fire. </p><p>Fire kills thousands of people every year, and there are instances where fire has been used as a weapon in terrorist attacks. During the November 2008 Mumbai attacks, a group of attackers holed up in the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel started fires in various parts of the hotel. </p><p>Anarchists and radical environmental and animal rights activists have conducted arson attacks against a variety of targets, including banks, department stores, ski resorts, and the homes and vehicles of research scientists.</p><p>It is common to find items stored in emergency stairwells that render them obstructed or sometimes impassable. This is especially true outside the United States, where fire codes may not be strictly enforced, if they exist at all. In some instances, fire doors have been chained shut due to criminal threats.</p><p>To mitigate the threat from fire, executives should note whether emergency exits at their hotel are passable. This applies to apartments and office buildings as well. </p><p>In the August 2011 Casino Royale attack in Monterrey, Mexico, the attackers ordered the occupants out of the building before dousing it with gasoline and lighting it on fire, but 52 people died because they were trapped inside the building by a fire exit that had been chained shut.</p><p>Travelers staying at hotels in countries with lax fire codes should stay above the second floor to avoid break-ins, but not above the sixth floor. That puts them within range of most fire department rescue ladders. </p><p>Smoke inhalation is also a concern. It is the primary cause of fire deaths and accounts for 50 to 80 percent of all deaths from indoor fires. </p><p>The U.S. diplomatic facility in Benghazi, Libya, that was attacked on September 11, 2012, is an apt example. A video of the building after the attack showed that fire had not badly damaged the building’s structure. The two diplomats killed in the attack did not die from gunfire or even rocket-propelled grenade strikes—they died from smoke inhalation. </p><p>At minimum, a smoke hood should be a key piece of safety equipment carried by the executive while traveling. These hoods can be easily carried in a purse or briefcase and can provide the wearer with 15 to 30 minutes of safe air to breathe. That time makes a world of difference when caught in a burning building, a subway tunnel, or an aircraft while trying to escape. </p><p>Many executive protection experts encourage executives to place smoke hoods next to their hotel bed. Another useful tool in such situations is a small, high-intensity flashlight to help them find their way through the smoke or dark once they have donned their smoke hood. ​</p><h4>Identifying Risks</h4><p>While executives may not appreciate the security team’s efforts to scare them ahead of a trip, they do need to know the inherent risks during travel and after reaching their destination. This will require advanced research by protective intelligence analysts to gather hard data on a range of issues appropriate to the destination. Alternatively, security can use a service that consistently tracks that data. This type of research involves analyzing everything from the latest street crime trends in London to the prevalence and nature of recent express kidnappings in certain Latin American cities, and incorporates that data into the executive briefing.</p><p>The briefing can also include the advance work of the corporate security team: analyzing the executive’s schedule, transportation routes, and destinations to determine the times and places where he or she is most vulnerable. By identifying the moments most likely to be used by a hostile actor, an executive can understand when to raise his or her level of situational awareness for greatest effect. This will also make it more difficult for assailants to conduct preoperational surveillance without detection.</p><p>On September 28, 2016, a group of assailants abducted Abid Abdullah, the executive director of Pakistan’s largest publishing group, during a business trip to Peshawar. Abdullah was in Peshawar to check on the status of a company facility under construction and did not return to his hotel until the early hours of the morning. </p><p>Several armed men in two vehicles stopped Abdullah and his driver around 3:15 a.m. in the city’s industrial area. Peshawar is dangerous even by Pakistan’s standards, and, based on his driver’s statements, Abdullah was traveling without a protective detail to an industrial park where the kidnapping team had likely been watching him while he conducted business late into the night. The industrial area made a good intercept point because it was likely to be deserted at that hour. On such visits, a robust security plan is needed. </p><p>There are always incidents that are more difficult to detect ahead of time. In July 2016, Jeff Shell, chairman of the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, was briefly detained and forced to leave Russia hours after arriving in the country. </p><p>Russian authorities pulled Shell out of the immigration line shortly after he arrived at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport from Prague. After hours of interrogation, Shell was told he had been barred from Russia and was placed on a flight to Amsterdam. </p><p>The Russian Foreign Ministry later explained that it barred Shell from Russia because of his involvement with the Broadcasting Board of Governors, a group that oversees U.S. government broadcasters. </p><p>Before July 13, there was no indication that Shell or anyone affiliated with the Broadcasting Board of Governors was included on any list. Russia’s lack of transparency on who is barred from the country and why is troubling for traveling corporate executives and can become highly disruptive, embarrassing, or potentially dangerous for those involved. Executives and their protection teams should take these sorts of threats into account long before they begin travel.​</p><h4>Liaisons </h4><p>Once executives are well-versed in these skills and practices, they may feel prepared to travel solo around the world. However, the work of the corporate security team doesn’t end there. </p><p>Whether the protective intelligence team is working for the government or in the private sector, it is critical to maintain frequent contact with the appropriate authorities and security counterparts where executives are likely to travel. </p><p>Beyond maintaining a close liaison with their counterparts and industry partners at the travel destination, corporate security officers should work with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies that would be called on to prosecute the case should someone commit an illegal act against an executive. </p><p>If an executive is traveling to another city or country on business, be sure to establish a line of communication with the counterpart at that company ahead of time. If an incident does occur, a liaison will provide a shared interest in executive safety or concern about the potential optics around incidents affecting executives who are visiting their company. </p><p>These counterparts should also have efficient lines of communication with their local law enforcement contacts. In that case, they can become an executive protection advocate on-site, or at least connect the team back home with the right people until the situation is fully resolved. </p><p>Executives can travel safely abroad with minimal intrusions on privacy, as long as corporate security teams establish proper procedures and baselines. Building trust with the executives and their administrative staff goes a long way to ensure that business travel functions without security disruptions. </p><p>Not every executive needs visible security officers on travel; however, every executive traveling abroad does require a good security team behind the scenes to properly balance risk and facilitation.  </p><p><em><strong>Fred Burton </strong>is chief security officer at geopolitical intelligence platform Stratfor.com and a lead analyst for Stratfor Threat Lens. He has authored three books, including </em>Under Fire: The Untold Story of the Attack in Benghazi.</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Key-to-Employee-Happiness.aspxThe Key to Employee Happiness<p>​</p><p>JOB SATISFACTION directly affects effectiveness and profitability. Poor job satisfaction can hinder an organization’s ability to deliver services as well as its ability to retain personnel. It can also contribute to staff misconduct, which can lead to criminal liability. By understanding what causes employee dissatisfaction, managers can help to avoid problems and keep morale and productivity high.</p><p>Available research on the topic indicates that more than 50 percent of employees are dissatisfied with their jobs but their bosses are unaware of this fact.</p><p>The government actually scores a little higher than the private sector in job satisfaction. The recent Federal Human Capital Survey conducted by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) found that 57 percent of federal employees were, overall, satisfied with their jobs. Still, with regard to recognition, promotional opportunity, communication, and leadership, satisfaction ratings were under 50 percent.</p><p>The 2009 Employee Job Satisfaction Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) might explain the high satisfaction number in government employment. The SHRM survey of private employees indicated that of all factors considered by employees when rating job satisfaction, job security was the most important factor. Typically, federal jobs carry more job security than private industry.</p><p>More specific data regarding the job satisfaction of federal employees who work in protection roles comes from a 2009 survey of federal probation officers. This study showed that 41 percent of respondents intended to leave their positions. Of these respondents, 30 percent were seriously considering leaving their position in the near future, and 11 percent were actively seeking employment elsewhere. Mirroring the OPM survey, respondents cited compensation, promotional opportunities, and the fairness exercised by management as primary reasons for their job dissatisfaction.</p><p>With regard to the private sector, an enlightening data set comes from a 2009 survey conducted by Salary.com. This survey found that while 65 percent were “somewhat” satisfied with their employment, the same percentage was either actively or passively seeking other employment opportunities. Additionally, 57 percent of respondents stated that they planned on intensifying their job search within the next three months even given the unsettled economic climate.</p><p>More surprising than the number of employees planning on seeking other job opportunities was the lack of awareness companies had regarding their employees’ job satisfaction. Employers surveyed by Salary.com thought that only 35 percent of their workers were looking for new jobs, while 78 percent of them thought that those employees were unlikely to intensify their job search.</p><p>Job satisfaction data specific to the security industry is scarce. In a 2009 survey by the security recruiting firm L.J. Kushner and Associates, IT security professionals were surveyed regarding job satisfaction. A majority, 52 percent, stated that they were unsatisfied with their current employment. Turnover data underscored respondents’ job dissatisfaction. Thirty-four percent said they leave an employer every two to three years, and 31 percent leave after four to five years. This represents a more than 60 percent turnover rate every five years.</p><p>Generally, employers appear to be oblivious to employees’ needs and desires. If an employer is unaware or mistaken regarding employee needs, it is impossible to shore up job satisfaction through modified compensation plans, leadership development, and work restructuring strategies.</p><p>An analysis of survey data sets reveals six specific reasons that employees leave their jobs. These identified keys to job satisfaction are: job security, leadership, job enjoyment, social justice, personal development, and adequate level of challenge.</p><p>Job Security<br>As highlighted above, an employee’s perceived level of confidence that they will remain employed is the most crucial factor in job satisfaction. Communicating job security to employees is more than just assuring them that they will be employed tomorrow. Consistent recognition for good job performance and how their contribution brings value to the organization is a good first step. Second, but just as important, is consistent and honest communication regarding the strategic long-term initiatives of the organization. Employees want and need to know what the future entails so they can plan and be prepared. Failure to communicate the organization’s strategy for the future may leave many employees wondering if there is a future and if it includes them.</p><p>Leadership<br>An organization’s leadership must set clear expectations. Leaders should instill trust in the work force and consistently model the organization’s values. The ability to communicate clearly and honestly on a consistent basis, which means every day with everyone, is also crucial. Modeling the ethical values expected of all employees is even more important for the leader, who becomes the standard by which others model their behavior. An unethical leader creates an oppressive work environment that employees seek to escape.</p><p>Task Enjoyment<br>The total percentage of time an employee engages in tasks that are enjoyable and that suit their personality has a serious effect on job satisfaction. Everyone’s job contains unpleasant tasks that are tedious, labor intensive, or boring. Although the boring tasks can’t be eliminated, managers must strike a balance between routine and uninteresting tasks and those an employee enjoys. Security managers must know and understand their staff to strike that balance, so once again, communication is the key.</p><p>Social Justice<br>Social justice in the workplace means that compensation, recognition, and advancement opportunities are based on performance and merit, while discipline is delivered in an egalitarian manner. This is a critical factor that can’t be overlooked. Employees want tangible rewards for their hard work and consistent good performance. This recognition must go beyond a mention at a department meeting. Likewise, employees need to know that poor job performance is penalized, since it requires other staff to work harder to satisfy organizational goals. Advancement opportunities that are based on merit and favor internal candidates reflect a commitment to social justice, while nepotism and favoritism do not.</p><p>Development<br>A positive sense of development exists when employees have the opportunity to cultivate new skills, gain knowledge, and advance their career within the organization. There is an element of social justice implicit in the sense that development opportunities are available to everyone. Leaders should proactively help employees to build career paths within the company. Not only does development of employee skills aid the employee in seeking advancement opportunities, it instills a sense of recognition that the organization is investing in the employee. A more skilled employee benefits the organization now and into the future.</p><p>Challenge<br>Providing a challenging environment means giving employees the opportunity to fully use their knowledge and skills. This factor correlates with enjoyment in some instances, because many employees derive enjoyment from challenging assignments. Presenting employees such tasks gives them a chance to build confidence and enjoy a sense of achievement. Leaders can also benefit from the process because it gives them a chance to see who rises to the occasion and most deserves advancement.</p><p>Equipped with this information, leaders in the security profession can begin establishing a baseline strategy for improving job satisfaction within their organization. That is the first step toward reducing turnover and developing a committed, knowledgeable, and productive work force.</p><p>William P. Carr is a program security manager for Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Sunnyvale, California. He is a member of ASIS International.<br></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---The-Handbook-of-Security.aspxBook Review: The Handbook of Security<p><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Editor Martin Gill has collected essays from more than 50 well-credentialed and respected authors to create a superb holistic catalog of security.  The Handbook of Security, Second Edition, builds upon the first edition with a wider array of subject matter and a greater diversity of topics, resulting in a more exciting study of the field and profession of security.  </span><br></p><p>Beginning with a comprehensive historical look at the security industry, the book goes on to answer fundamental questions about the range of threats facing today’s world. It looks at how current economic conditions—far different from when the previous edition was first published—have affected the profession and agencies responsible for predicting and reacting to crime, and to what degree technological advances have impacted our world. The overall result is that security has become a dominant feature in our lives, whether we know it or not.</p><p>Although, at more than 1,000 pages, The Handbook of Security can appear daunting, this is indeed essential reading for all those involved with the security world. Both the student of security and the security professional will become engaged in the content, from the historical study of security as a discipline to the long-range issues impacting the profession. Among other things, it addresses crimes by offense and by industry, risk management, security processes, research in the field, and ethical issues. One shortcoming of the book is that it does not provide many charts or graphs to illustrate and support the material, though the flow of the text sufficiently covers the information.  </p><p>This book has significant value to security professionals at all levels as well as being a valuable research tool for the academic world of security management. It will soon be dog-eared and filled with bookmarks as are the invaluable resources in any professional’s library.</p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Terry L. Wettig, CPP</strong>, is director of security risk management for Brink’s Incorporated and is based in Richmond Virginia. A retired U.S. Air Force chief master sergeant, he is studying for a Ph.D. in organizational psychology.  </em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465