CSO/Leadership

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/How-Organizations-Prompt-Different-Levels-of-Engagement.aspxHow Organizations Prompt Different Levels of EngagementGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-04-01T04:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/mark-tarallo.aspx, Mark Tarallo<p>​George Bradt, management expert and leadership columnist for Forbes magazine, divides the engagement continuum into four levels: disengaged, compliance engagement, contributing engagement, and committed engagement. </p><p>Most organizations, he argues, get the level of employee engagement that they deserve—they provoke it by the way they treat employees.</p><p>How can an organization prompt disengagement? Bradt offers the following example. In the current U.S. workplace, reorganizations are very common. Often under an “evolve or die” ethos, companies feel they need to change to compete more successfully. These reorganizations can include various types of changes, including layoffs, amended job responsibilities, rearranged chains of commands, expanded or streamlined work processes, and altered goals and objectives. </p><p>However, these changes often leave employees confused and uncertain. “Then [company leaders] are surprised when people start becoming disengaged,” he says with a laugh. This disengagement often leads to more turnover. “People don’t know what they are supposed to be doing,” he explains. “So they find happiness elsewhere.”</p><p>The next level up is compliance engagement. In this state, employees stay engaged with their work just enough to fulfill their responsibilities and keep their jobs. For some organizations, this level of engagement works; the U.S. Navy and Air Force often operate along these lines, because both have strict command-and-control structures in which people are prompted to do exactly as ordered to minimize mistakes, Bradt explains. Assembly lines in manufacturing plants, and some lab testing facilities, have followed a similar philosophy, and many have been productive doing so. Here, clear policies for each individual job are important.  </p><p>The third level is contributing engagement: employees who are going beyond fulfilling their job responsibilities, but actively trying to improve operations. For many organizations, this is the sweet spot of engagement, and they would like to turn their disengaged employees into contributing employees. </p><p>But to achieve this change, the organization must establish the right conditions for such contributions. “You have to invite them [to contribute], and you have to reward them,” Bradt says. </p><p>For example, let’s say a manager invites an employee to contribute to a special project. The employee does so and makes a substantial contribution, but the time spent on the project means less time for the employee’s normal duties, and his or her regular work slips a bit as a result. Penalizing the employee for that could discourage future contributions, and increase the changes of lowered engagement. </p><p>Instead, the manager’s invitation to contribute should also include a conversation on how the employee can best manage the workload, with the manager open to the approach of, “What can I do to ease the burden?” Bradt says. </p><p>Stage four of engagement is the committed stage. This is the small percentage of employees who are so committed and emotionally invested in a professional cause, that they need no prompting or invitation to contribute. </p><p>“You just have to get out of their way,” he says. Their accomplishments can be stellar, but they can also be more committed to their causes then to the organization. “Committed people are going to run over you,” he says. “Unleash them and they are gone.”</p>

CSO/Leadership

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Operational-Policy-Making.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZBook Review: Operational Policy Making
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cultivate-Engagement.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZCultivate Engagement
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/March-2017-Letters-to-the-Editor.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZMarch 2017 Letters to the Editor
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Security-Culture.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Security Culture
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Art-of-Servant-Leadership.aspx2017-03-01T05:00:00ZThe Art of Servant Leadership
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-News-February-2017.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZJack Lichtenstein Leaves ASIS, Offers Insights on Trump
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Business-Continuity.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Business Continuity
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Day-to-Day-Tactics.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZDay-to-Day Tactics
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Take-Time.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZEditor's Note: Take Time
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/SM-Online-January-2017.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZSM Online January 2017
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Maintain.aspx2016-12-01T05:00:00ZEditor's Note: Maintain
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Angela-Osborne,-PCI.aspx2016-12-01T05:00:00ZCertification Profile: Angela Osborne, PCI
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Hunt-for-Talent.aspx2016-12-01T05:00:00ZThe Hunt for Talent
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Editor's-Note---Threatscape.aspx2016-11-01T04:00:00ZEditor's Note: Threatscape

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Day-to-Day-Tactics.aspxDay-to-Day Tactics<p>​Managers can also share day-to-day tips with employees on avoiding burnout and staying energized, experts say. They include the following: </p><h4>Give me a break</h4><p>Take breaks at the right time. Whenever energy is highest—often in the morning for many workers—focus on moving forward on tasks to maximize your productivity. After a few hours of that, step away for a rest.</p><h4>Walk it off</h4><p>Getting out of the office can help you get out of the weeds and consider the big picture. Sometimes, this is when solutions become apparent. Have lunch away from your desk or take a walk in the afternoon.  </p><h4>Screen your time</h4><p>Limit the use of digital devices after hours. Some place their smartphone in a drawer after arriving home, so they are not tempted to keep checking texts and emails. Others turn it off after a certain hour, like 8 p.m. </p><h4>Refresh with a film</h4><p>Schedule restorative experiences. Studies indicate that doing an activity you find interesting—even if that activity is taxing—can be more restorative than simply relaxing. Using the mind for something other than work can also be renewing. When he experienced writer’s block due to fatigue, Nobel Prize–winning novelist Saul Bellow found that going to see a movie on five consecutive nights was mentally refreshing. </p><h4>Get out of here</h4><p>Vacations are critical, but many workers can take them only once a year. Given this reality, taking regular three-day weekends can be an excellent way to periodically reduce stress. But don’t assume that burnout can be alleviated simply by giving a worker an unexpected day off, which is merely a Band-Aid.   ​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Maturity--Model-101.aspxMaturity Model 101<div><p>​</p><p><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Documents/1216%20Sidebar%20Graphic%202a.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:356px;" /><br></p><p>Maturity models are a tool used a range of business sectors, including​ manufacturing, software engineering, operations, and logistics. The model is often used to help set process improvement objectives and priorities, and it can provide a method for appraising the state of an organization’s current practices. </p></div><p>Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have been developing early maturity model prototypes since the 1980s. In 2002, CMU released the first version of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) tool, which was developed by a group of experts from industry, govern­ment, and CMU’s Software Engineering Institute. Updated versions of the tool were released in 2006 and 2010. </p><p>The Ernst & Young (EY) physical security maturity model developed with Caterpillar is based on this CMMI tool, and also on EY’s cybersecurity maturity model.</p><p>This tool uses a level 1 through 5 rating scale to define maturity levels: (1) Initial, (2) Repeatable, (3) Defined, (4) Managed, and (5) Optimized. For a hypothetical example, take the compliance component of a security department. In the Initial stage of a maturity model, processes are unpredictable, poorly controlled, and reactive. Thus, in that initial stage, the security department is conducting its compliance activities in a haphazard way—putting out fires when they flare, with no real established process for doing so. ​</p><p>When compliance reaches level 3, Defined, the compliance process is established and proactive—perhaps with guidelines enforced by a compliance officer. At level 5, Optimized, the process is so well-established, managed, and defined, that the focus is now on process improvements.  </p><p>​​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Marketing-Securitys-Mission.aspxMarketing Security's Mission<p>​</p><p>GETTING CORPORATE executives to focus on security issues can be a challenge, especially in the hospitality industry, where generating revenue is a constant goal and is pursued afresh with every new conference or event. A security manager must establish security as a top priority for the organization so that security recommendations are sincerely considered by the senior team and not simply pushed aside.</p><p>One hotel chain security chief successfully did that by adopting performance indicators to measure the value of security and having the general manager share those same goals. Security was also marketed to the organization as a unique selling point, further cementing security as part of the property’s culture.</p><p>Performance Indicators<br>The first step was to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) that were unique to security. KPIs are used to evaluate the performance of employees all around the world. They are measurable and objective indicators that determine whether a manager has succeeded or failed to meet the set expectations.</p><p>For example, in the case of both a general manager and a sales manager at a hotel, the KPI might be revenue per available room, a comparative peer-group ranking such as market share, or a dollar amount of revenue that needs to be generated and surpassed per month. The HR manager and general manager may jointly be evaluated based on a KPI related to employee turnover or overall employee satisfaction.</p><p>As the hospitality industry becomes increasingly environmentally friendly, some chief engineers and general managers now have to meet KPIs related to power consumption, water usage, or overall green efforts.</p><p>While the general manager has included the KPIs from sales, human resources, and engineering in his own goals, he has no KPI related to security. Before asking the general manager to take on a security KPI of his own, the hotel security team in our example first set out to create a quantifiable, objective, and effective KPI that could be easily measured, just like the sales manager’s numerical revenue-based goal. Security decided to use three measurements for its KPI: customer satisfaction surveys, a secret shopper program, and the company’s employee-satisfaction survey.</p><p>Customer surveys. The hotel already conducted customer surveys to evaluate the performance of the hotel. Customers were asked to rate their satisfaction with everything ranging from the variety of food on the breakfast buffet to the cleanliness of their rooms. The security manager asked the general manager to add a question along the lines of, “During your visit, did you feel secure in your hotel room?” Customers could answer the question on a sliding numerical scale that could be used to tally an average score for the month or year. Shortly after the question was added, security began receiving the monthly scores of the security question.</p><p>As the new surveys were implemented throughout the region, security could also see its ranking against the company’s other hotels. This added an unexpected tone of competitiveness amongst sister properties that greatly benefited the security of all the sites.</p><p>Secret shopper. A secret shopper program is where someone is hired to come in under the guise of being a paying customer to evaluate the services and report back to management. The practice is common among hotels, and this hotel had such a program in place via a third-party provider.</p><p>The secret shoppers’ reviews under this program were detailed and included play-by-play accounts of how a front desk agent greeted them, if there were smudges on the elevator glass, and if the tip of the toilet paper had been folded properly.</p><p>A security component was already included in this survey, but it was related to housekeepers leaving guest room doors ajar. For the purposes of the current effort to develop KPIs, the security manager added a new segment to the secret shopper’s itinerary. During future visits, secret shoppers would call for security to help open their in-room safes. They would time how long it took security to respond, if the responding officers followed the safe-opening protocols, and if they provided the proper customer service standards such as greeting the guest by name and asking permission to enter the room.</p><p>Employee satisfaction. Security also added a question to the company’s employee satisfaction survey. This survey included general questions about working conditions and asked whether the employee would recommend the company to a friend. Security’s question was: “Do you feel safe working at the hotel?” The fact that there was now a measurable indicator of safety as a component in employee satisfaction quickly resulted in a heightened level of support from not just the general manager but also from the HR team, because their own performance rating was tied to these results.</p><p>Ultimately, the general manager combined these three KPI measurements into a single Security Survey Index which he included as one of his own KPIs. The existence of this new index and its inclusion by the general manager as an indicator of his success led to a new level of support and respect from the entire management team. It was readily apparent that security had been upgraded in the company culture.</p><p>A security manager must also learn to think like a sales manager and learn to promote security as something that enhances or protects the company’s financial well-being rather than as something that is a drain on its finances.</p><p>Marketing Security<br>Another key aspect of the business that security had previously not been involved in was wooing clients when they were invited to the property for a site visit.</p><p>Site visits were a critical part of marketing the hotel to potential clients. These tours, which took two to three hours, would include all parts of the hotel property, with the hotel’s most valuable players choreographing a presentation of the property’s finest amenities into one large, walking sales pitch. Apart from arranging for a good parking spot, security had previously taken no part in the marketing of the hotel.</p><p>The involvement of security came about somewhat serendipitously. One afternoon, the security director was walking outside a ballroom when he ran across the sales manager giving a tour. The security director jokingly asked if the sales manager had pointed out the automated external defibrillator (AED) mounted on the wall nearby. The tour participants were curious what an AED was and asked for more information.</p><p>After that tour, the sales manager came to the security director and suggested that the AED become a part of every sales tour going forward. After several iterations, the tour had evolved to permanently include a brief stop at the security control room. The officers would show the visitors how seriously master key security is taken, and how quickly security cancels lost keys for the protection of guests. “Cancel first, ask questions later,” the sales manager would chime in each time.</p><p>For privacy’s sake, security would turn off the CCTV monitoring panels during the visit but would take a moment to show them a camera image zoomed in on their arrival earlier in the day. Anytime a security training session was taking place, security would invite the sales manager to bring a tour through for a brief stop.</p><p>The new tour experience proved to be a great success. Clients would regularly say that no other hotel showed them how much effort went into protecting guests. Others remarked that it broke up the boredom of touring hotel room after hotel room and that it was interesting to have a look behind the scenes. All the feedback was positive.</p><p>Three months later, a well-known technology company booked a weeklong conference at the hotel. The company took every meeting room and almost every guest room, and it booked private events at the different hotel restaurants each night. The conference was a major win for the hotel. The sales manager forwarded an e-mail to the security director, which contained the signed contract. The last lines of the e-mail read, “Our company is very sensitive to the security of our employees. Your hotel’s similar commitment to guest security is one of the primary reasons we are entrusting our event to you.”</p><p>This e-mail elevated the security program to an entirely new level. It was clear that, in addition to generating revenue, the security team’s participation in the sales tours had also made security part of the property’s culture.</p><p>Every major security project proposal must still be sold on its own merits, every decision still debated, and every line in the security budget must still be justified based on its return on investment. However, the department has a much better chance of having its concerns taken seriously now that it can show results with KPIs that are shared by the general manager and tied directly to the company’s bottom line concerns.</p><p>Michael Merola, CPP, is an international security consultant currently based in Dubai.<br></p>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465