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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---William-J.-Powers,-III,-CPP.aspxWilliam J. Powers, III, CPPGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-11-01T04:00:00Z<p>​William J. Powers, III, CPP, is director of facilities at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The Clark’s 140-acre campus includes five buildings that house museum galleries, an art history library, an auditorium, research facilities, a sophisticated physical plant, and offices. The campus also has an expansive landscape, including a reflecting pool, woodland meadows, and walking trails. The Clark’s permanent collection includes American and European art amassed during the first half of the 20th century by Francine and Sterling Clark.</p><p>To secure this eclectic campus, Powers oversees 12 full-time employees and a 60-person contract security staff. In his 22 years at the Clark, Powers has seen much growth in the institute’s programs and facilities, including a recent $170 million expansion and renovation. “I worked very closely with the security consultant on product selection,” says Powers. “I am proud to say that the installation and implementation of the choices were seamless.” The result, he adds, is a system that is a model for other institutions.</p><p>Powers’ biggest challenge is responding to HVAC alarms. “The museum requires very stable climate control 365 days a year,” he says. “I have found that if you follow acknowledged best practices you can have peace of mind.” He credits his affiliation with ASIS International for giving him access to the latest best practices, as well as subject matter experts. </p><p>Two achievements helped Powers reach his current status. The first was completing his master’s degree. At the time, Powers was supporting two children in college, and attaining that degree seemed impossible. But he applied for and was selected as a recipient of an ASIS/University of Phoenix scholarship. The second was when Powers received his Certified Protection Professional© (CPP) certification. “These two events really lifted my confidence and proved that I was a true professional,” he says.</p><p>Powers was an ASIS volunteer leader for many years before pursuing the CPP, and knew peers who had their CPPs. As past chair of the ASIS Cultural Properties Council and current member of the Awards Committee, “I wanted to be recognized that I am in those positions for a reason.” </p><p>Studying for the CPP also pushed Powers to review guidelines and best practices that he otherwise might have overlooked. In his position, he must understand all facets of security—physical, electronic, and cyber. By earning his CPP, he says, “I confirmed my competence in all aspects of security management,” he adds.</p><p>Powers never expected to be in his current position. A trained auto mechanic, his first job was in the facilities department of a museum. He eventually became director of facilities at that institution, which included oversight of security.</p><p>Today, Powers mentors young professionals coming into the field, reminding them that private security can provide a career path that is personally and financially rewarding if they work towards professional certifications. To that end, Powers advises taking a CPP review course and investing time in studying for the test. The payoff, for Powers, is obvious: “I am now a more effective, well-rounded security professional.”</p>

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---William-J.-Powers,-III,-CPP.aspx2017-11-01T04:00:00ZWilliam J. Powers, III, CPP
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/November-2017-ASIS-News.aspx2017-11-01T04:00:00ZNovember 2017 ASIS News
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-Europe-to-tackle-Big-Data,-Artificial-Intelligence.aspx2017-10-01T04:00:00ZOctober 2017 ASIS News: ASIS Europe to tackle Big Data, Artificial Intelligence
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Caress-Kennedy,-CPP.aspx2017-10-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Caress Kennedy, CPP
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Top-Chapter-Volunteer-is-Recognized.aspx2017-09-27T04:00:00ZTop Chapter Volunteer is Recognized
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Members-Discuss-Concerns-in-Town-Hall.aspx2017-09-26T04:00:00ZMembers Discuss Concerns in Town Hall
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Introducing-the-Newest-ASIS-Board-Members.aspx2017-09-26T04:00:00ZIntroducing the Newest ASIS Board Members
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-Names-Security-Book-of-the-Year-Winner.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZASIS Names Security Book of the Year Winner
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Greipp-Scholarship-Recipients-Named.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZGreipp Scholarship Recipients Named
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Security-Cares-Aids-the-Dallas-Community.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZSecurity Cares Aids the Dallas Community
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Dallas-Change-Management.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZDallas Change Management
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Wharton-ASIS-Program-Prepares-Executives-for-Challenges.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZWharton/ASIS Program Prepares Executives for Challenges
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-CPP-Turns-40.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZThe CPP Turns 40
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/New-Strategic-Plan-to-Guide-Direction-of-the-Society.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZNew Strategic Plan to Guide Direction of the Society
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Onward-and-Upward.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZOnward and Upward
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cross-Award-Winners-Named.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZCross Award Winners Named
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Not-the-North-Texas-Chapter’s-First-Rodeo.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZNot the North Texas Chapter’s First Rodeo
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Marquez-Memorial-Honoree-Named-Tonight.aspx2017-09-25T04:00:00ZMarquez Memorial Honoree Named Tonight
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile--Felix-Giannini,-CPP.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZCertification Profile: Felix Giannini, CPP
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-Awards-School-Security-Grant-and-More-ASIS-News.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZASIS Awards School Security Grant & More ASIS News

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Global-Water-Risk.aspxGlobal Water Risk<p>​If, as biblical wisdom reveals, the meek shall inherit the earth, then perhaps it will be the dirty, not the pure, who help build a sustainable global future—at least when it comes to water, say scientists.</p><p>As an issue of global significance, water security has recently vaulted to prominence. Half of the world’s largest cities now experience water scarcity, and roughly two-thirds of the world’s populace face seasonal or annual water stress. </p><p>The future looks even drier. Demand for water is expected to exceed supply by 40 percent within 15 years, if current conditions continue. By 2025, absolute water scarcity will be a daily reality for an estimated 1.8 billion people, according to a United Nations (UN) estimate. Water scarcity can lead to instability and violence; the crisis in Syria was triggered by, among other factors, a historic drought from 2007 to 2010.</p><p>But water security is a complex issue, and scarcity is merely one of its components.</p><p>Most activities that require water produce wastewater. As water usage grows, so does the production of wastewater. And more than 80 percent of wastewater worldwide is released into the environment untreated according to some estimates. </p><p>This discharge can contribute to devastating consequences. In 2012, for example, more than 800,000 deaths worldwide were caused by contaminated drinking water, inadequate handwashing facilities, and insufficient sanitation services. </p><p>In the oceans and larger seas, wastewater discharge sometimes causes deoxygenated dead zones that harm an estimated 245,000 square kilometers of marine ecosystems, according to UN estimates.</p><p>But instead of being discharged, wastewater can be treated—and reused. And more officials and experts are realizing the benefits of this new approach. </p><p>“Wastewater is gaining momentum as a reliable alternative source of water,” says the recently released United Nations World Water Development Report for 2017: Wastewater, the Untapped Resource. </p><p>“Wastewater is no longer seen as a problem in need of a solution, rather it is part of the solution to challenges that societies are facing today,” the report finds. “Wastewater can also be a cost-efficient and sustainable source of energy, nutrients, organic matter, and other useful by-products.” </p><p>Given the skyrocketing demand for water, the positive effect that wastewater reuse could have on the global water crisis is “immense,” says Robert Glennon, a water policy expert at the University of Arizona and author of Unquenchable: America’s Water Crisis and What to Do About It.</p><p>“This is a very big deal,” Glennon tells Security Management. He cites the example of the state of Arizona, which has been active in reusing water for a few decades now. Facilities like golf courses and ballparks can consume large amounts of water, he says, so Arizona’s water reuse practices have been helpful. </p><p>Moreover, state officials have formed WateReuse Arizona, a group that assists communities in achieving sustainable water supplies through reuse. Among other things, the group offers scholarships for Arizona college students interested in specializing in water reuse and reclamation.</p><p>On the U.S. federal level, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced in May that it awarded $23.6 million to seven states for researching, planning, designing, and constructing water reuse projects. </p><p>Often, treating wastewater so that it can be reused for agricultural purposes is less expensive than purifying it to the level where it can be used as drinking water. Given this, countries are becoming more aggressive in their water reuse programs, according to the report. </p><p>For example, in 2013, 71 percent of the wastewater collected in the Arab states was safely treated, and 21 percent was being reused, mostly for irrigation and groundwater recharge.   </p><p>Other regions are realizing the potential benefits of wastewater reuse. In the Asia Pacific region, some countries have discovered that byproducts from domestic wastewater, such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and salt, have potential economic value. </p><p>For example, case studies in Southeast Asia have shown that revenues generated from wastewater byproducts, such as fertilizer, are significantly higher than the operational costs of treating the wastewater. That provides an economic incentive for water reuse, the report finds. </p><p>However, “more needs to be done across the region to support municipal and local governments in managing urban wastewater and capturing its resource benefits,” the report adds. </p><p>In Latin America and the Caribbean, urban wastewater treatment has almost doubled since the late 1990s, so that between 20 and 30 percent of wastewater collected in all sewer systems is now treated. </p><p>“Treated wastewater could be an important source of water supply in some cities, particularly those located in arid areas (such as Lima), or where long-distance transfers are required to meet growing demands, particularly during drought (such as São Paulo),” the report finds.   </p><p>While progress in reusing wastewater has been made in the United States and around the world, there are still constraining factors hindering even more progress, Glennon says. One is cost; some localities in developing countries struggle to afford construction of wastewater treatment plants.   </p><p>Another is that countries like China and India continue to use unsustainable practices when it comes to their water supply, such as “pumping groundwater with impunity.” India, for example, has yet to truly face up to its water shortage crisis and change its practices. “The rules of groundwater pumping remain so relaxed,” Glennon says. </p><p>And in places where water scarcity is currently not a huge issue, some officials have the attitude of, “Why should I bother to reuse water if I can just drill a well?” Glennon says. He compares this attitude to the mistaken belief that an unlimited number of straws can be placed in the same glass—eventually, all the liquid will be sucked out. </p><p>In addition, there are some security issues related to the practice of wastewater reuse, says Yves Duguay, CEO and founder of HCIWorld, who has had on-the-ground experience with audits of water works and other infrastructure systems. For example, systematic controls in the process are needed to ensure that health, safety, and security requirements are maintained. “Most of the time, my audits have shown a lack of oversight and controls, along with poor contract performance management. This can increase the risk for water reuse,” he says. </p><p>This is doubly important in areas where waste management operations, which can include water reuse, are linked to corruption and even organized crime. “How certain are we that waste, solid or liquid, is being disposed as expected and regulated?” he asks. </p><p>Still, developed countries like the United States and Canada can show leadership by developing a systematic approach to the recycle and reuse of wastewater, Duguay says. And since it is not an “in-your-face issue,” wastewater reuse needs more awareness and advocacy so it is not crowded out by more publicized political concerns. “There is little room on our governments’ agenda for such a topic, unless it is talked about and frequently communicated to the general public,” he explains.</p><p>Nonetheless, in areas of the world where water scarcity hits hardest, it will ultimately become a necessity to reuse treated wastewater, because supply will not hold out, Glennon says. “Some places will have to use that for drinking water—there is simply no alternative,” Glennon explains. Duguay echoes this view: “There is no doubt that we need to control our utilization of water; it’s a unique resource that is not infinite,” he says. </p><p>In the end, the UN report argues that, in a world where limited water resources are increasingly stressed by over-abstraction, pollution, and climate change, it is imperative for officials around the globe to focus on wastewater treatment and reuse.   </p><p>“Neglecting the opportunities arising from improved wastewater management,” the report concludes, “is nothing less than unthinkable.”  ​ ​</p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Most-Resilient-Countries-in-the-World.aspxThe Most Resilient Countries in the World<p>​Property loss prevention consultant FM Global released its <a href="http://www.fmglobal.com/research-and-resources/tools-and-resources/resilienceindex/explore-the-data/?&sn=1" target="_blank">fifth annual <em>Resilience Index</em></a><em>,</em> which ranks 130 countries on their enterprise resilience to disruptive events. The ranking is data-driven and assesses categories such as economic factors, risk quality, and supply chain. It allows executives to plan supply chain and expansion strategies based on insight regarding risks and opportunities, according to the FM Global website. </p><p>Giving a nod to new trends that affect supply chain resilience, FM Global introduced three new drivers of resilience to its assessment: supply chain visibility, urbanization rate, and inherent cyber risk. Supply chain visibility addresses the ease of tracking goods across a country’s supply chain. “The more visible and robust the supply chain and the faster it can begin functioning as normal following a major local event, the greater its resilience,” the report notes.</p><p>The urbanization rate is based on the percentage of the country’s population that lives in urban areas. While urbanization is typically associated with a country’s development, it can prove to be risky in an area with high natural hazards. And rapid and unplanned urbanization can create pressure on utilities and infrastructure, which can be a significant threat to the country’s resilience, according to the report.</p><p>2017 is also the first year that the threat of cyberattacks has been acknowledged in the report. The inherent cyber risk driver is defined as “a blend of a country’s vulnerability to cyberattack, combined equally with the country’s ability to recover.” This is calculated by determining the percentage of citizens with access to the Internet, as well as how the government responds to cyberattacks. “Countries that recover well from major events are those with a thriving industry in malware or cybersecurity, and where governments are willing to step in and help citizens in the event of a nationwide hacking,” the report says.</p><p>At the top of the list for the fifth year is Switzerland, an “acknowledged area of stability for generations” with infrastructure and political stability that makes its supply chain reliable and resilient. However, natural disasters and cyberattacks remain a threat to the country. </p><p>Also notable is Luxembourg, which was ranked eighth in 2013 but placed second this year. A growth in the country’s services sector, combined with its reduced economic reliance on oil and its business-friendly regulations, makes Luxembourg a safe place to expand operations to, the report finds. And due to its location, Luxembourg may serve as a new home for companies following the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union.</p><p>At the other end of the spectrum, Haiti is ranked last due to its lack of supply chain and standards and its high rate of poverty. Similarly, Venezuela fared poorly due to corruption, natural disasters, poor infrastructure, and ill-perceived quality of local suppliers.  ​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/21st-century-security-and-cpted-designing-critical-infrastructure-protection-and-crime-prev-0.aspx21st Century Security and CPTED: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Crime Prevention, Second Edition.<div class="body"> <p> <em> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">CRC Press. Available from ASIS, item #2078; 954 pages; $120 (ASIS member), $132 (nonmember). Also available as e-book.</span> </span> </em> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">As good as the first edition of 21st Century Security and CPTED was, this second edition surpasses it. Atlas, known in security circles as a consummate professional, has done an outstanding job in creating this second edition, which has twice as much material as the original edition. It also includes voluminous references and hundreds of outstanding clarifying photos in both color and black-and-white. Using humor and candid insight he incorporates all the concepts of CPTED, including design, construction, security countermeasures, and risk management strategies, and merges them into a highly informative reference manual for security practitioners at every level.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">There is a logical flow to the book. It lays a solid foundation by discussing architecture and its intent, as well as environmental crime control theories and premises liability. There is something here for everyone as it also discusses terrorism and critical infrastructure from differing perspectives. Several chapters on problem solving provide guidance on conducting threat, risk, and vulnerability assessments.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Throughout, Atlas provides a roadmap for merging security and CPTED into management principles and practices in a wide variety of facility settings, including healthcare facilities, critical infrastructure, ATMs, office buildings, parking lots and structures, and parks and green spaces. The latter portion of the book is reserved for concepts including lighting, LEED and GREEN certification, workplace violence, signage, data capture and analysis, and conducting CPTED surveys.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Atlas has created the definitive book on CPTED and security. Despite the magnitude and complexity of the science and art of security management, he has done an outstanding job of merging these and other disciplines and concepts together into a cogent display of information that the reader should be able to apply in a wide variety of locations and situations. If you are only going to buy one book this year, it is strongly suggested you purchase this one. </span> </span> </p> <hr /> <p> <span style="color:#800000;"> <strong> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Reviewer:</span> </span> </strong> </span> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;"> Glen Kitteringham, CPP, has worked in the security industry since 1990. He holds a master’s degree in security and crime risk management. He is president of Kitteringham Security Group Inc., which consults with companies around the globe. </span> </span> </p> </div>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465