Museums and Cultural Properties

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Get-to-Know-Malcolm-Smith,-CPP.aspxGet to Know Malcolm Smith, CPPGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652019-08-01T04:00:00Z<h2>​Malcolm Smith, CPP, is the head of risk management for Qatar Museums and is the secretary for ASIS International’s Board of Directors.</h2><p></p><h4>Q. What risky thing have you done? How did it turn out?</h4><p>A. Joining the military in 1983 to fight the Bush War in Namibia and Angola. During that period, young white South Africans were mandated to serve two years of military service. As a person of color, I was not obligated. But risking my life for a fight that was not really mine has paid off.</p><div><h4>​Q. What advice do you give to new folks in the industry? </h4><p>A. Keep reinventing yourself to stay relevant.</p><div><h4>Q. How did military service affect your professional career? </h4><p>A. My military career has paved the way to where I am today. In fact, that’s where my appetite for volunteering started.  </p><div><h4>​Q. What does ASIS mean to you? </h4><p>A. To me, ASIS means knowledge sharing and building global connections, which are both what you know and who you know. </p>​<span style="color:#222222;font-family:novecentosanswide-bold, sans-serif;font-size:1.1em;text-transform:uppercase;">Q. What is the best advice you’ve gotten regarding your career? </span></div><div><p>A. “You are as good as your last job.” This advice has helped me to stay grounded and open to continuous learning.</p><p><br></p></div><p><br></p></div><p><br></p></div><p><br></p>

Museums and Cultural Properties

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Safety-in-Shared-Spaces.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZSafety in Shared Spaces
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Securing-Sacred-Spaces.aspx2017-08-01T04:00:00ZSecuring Sacred Spaces
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/UN-MUSEO-DEL-MUNDO-Y-PARA-EL-MUNDO.aspx2017-06-03T04:00:00ZUN MUSEO DEL MUNDO Y PARA EL MUNDO
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Communal-Protection.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZCommunal Protection
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Surveillance-is-Instrumental.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZSurveillance is Instrumental
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Museum-of-the-World-and-for-the-World.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZA Museum of the World and for the World
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Culture-in-Crisis.aspx2016-11-01T04:00:00ZCulture in Crisis
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-New-Mandate-for-the-Modern-Library.aspx2016-07-01T04:00:00ZA New Mandate for the Modern Library
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Religions-Institutions.aspx2016-06-01T04:00:00ZBook Review: Keeping Religious Institutions Secure

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/house-worship-security-and-training-tips.aspxHouse of Worship Security and Training Tips<div class="body"> <p>Last year’s shootings at a Colorado mission and megachurch are a reminder that even houses of worship must address security.</p> <p>One major initiative is the Secure Community Network, or SCN (pronounced “scan”), organized by major American Jewish leadership organizations to bring Jewish community security under one group. SCN’s Web site is packed with security resources and advice for all types of houses of worship. ASIS International also has church security guidelines, which include advice on physical security and on hiring security personnel.</p> <p>“The biggest void between police and security in the public is the flow of information,” says SCN’s National Director Paul Goldenberg. SCN attempts to rectify that issue by forging relationships with law enforcement.</p> <p>The group receives sensitive information on threats to the Jewish community around-the-clock, which it then disseminates to its members. Goldenberg adds that the SCN is the first nongovernmental organization to have a memorandum of understanding with the New York City Police Department.</p> <p>The group is also working with the Department of Homeland Security to coordinate its house of worship training. The most important step a house of worship can take is to train its staff to handle threatening situations and to ensure that they are able to operate any security equipment the building has, says Goldenberg, who was part of a south Florida undercover strike force for several years.</p> <p>Training is all the more important in this field given that many house of worship security force members are volunteers and may not have law enforcement backgrounds.</p> <p>Some states are requiring that volunteers get licensed or that churches hire only licensed security professionals.</p> <p>Texas, for example, requires that anyone providing volunteer security services under the title “security” be licensed by the state. That law forced Dallas megachurch The Potter’s House last year to professionalize its force, says Sean Smith, who was the security director there when he says the Texas Private Security Bureau told the church it would be fined because the volunteer security team was unlicensed.</p> <p>The church chose to contract its security to an outside company. Smith went through the state licensing program and became senior account manager, with the rest of the security staff coming from the contracted company. </p> <p>“It’s just forcing us to be better,” says Smith, adding that once the church contracted its security out, its liability insurance “dropped tremendously.”</p> <p>Chuck Chadwick, of the National Association of Church Security & Safety Management (NACSSM), thinks crackdowns like the one in Texas are necessary. “Unlicensed security is rampant across the country,” he says.</p> <p>Jim Hashem, chief of staff of Kingdom Life Christian Church in Milford, Connecticut, had his all-volunteer security force trained by an outside company and licensed. Even so, says Hashem, if there is even a hint of violence, his security team is instructed to immediately call 911. The team’s job is only to manage the interim time before the police show up.</p> <p>And they avoid physical confrontation. “[We’ve] trained our people that the best way through a situation is to try to talk your way through it first,” Hashem explains. </p> <p>The Potter’s House sponsors a church security conference called STOPPED (Security Training Offering Policies, Procedure, Education, and Direction), which has brought in actors for demonstrations on how to handle an irate congregation member. That’s more typical than a shooter.  </p> <p>Smith says such comprehensive training is integral to responding effectively. “If all you’ve practiced on is what to do when the guy comes with a gun, then what do you do when the alcoholic comes, and he’s drunk?” he says, adding that “you’re going to see that a hundred times more than what happened in Colorado.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> <!--[endif]--></p> </div>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/smaller-churches-lack-security-experts-say-005316.aspxSmaller Churches Lack Security, Experts Say<div class="body"> <span class="article_date"> <span class="date-display-single">03/10/2009</span> - </span> <p>Experts say smaller churches generally lack security plans that could help identify an attacker beforehand or minimize the damage of an attack, <a href="http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jl7sa7F5lsTzkPKYB5AvnlLppzTgD96R21IG0" target="_blank">the Associated Press reports</a>. </p> <p>The new emphasis comes after the Reverand Fred Winters was gunned down Sunday morning in Maryville, Illinois, while saying mass. The shooter, 27-year-old Jeff Sedlacek, has been charged with Winters' murder as well as aggravated assault for stab wounds inflicted on two parishoners who subdued him after the shooting.</p> <p>The fact that the First Baptist Church had initiated a security and emergency plan six months before the shooting shouldn't dissuade other churches from planning ahead, the church's associate pastor Mark Jones told the AP.</p> <p>Televangelist churches and megachurches with attendance levels around 5,000, however, generally have coordinated security plans and have hired undercover security guards to protect high-profile preachers, according to Dave Travis, managing director of the <a href="http://www.leadnet.org/about_OurMission.asp" target="_blank">Leadership Network</a>,  which helps church leaders grow their churches. </p> <p>Jeffrey Hawkins, executive director of the <a href="http://www.christiansecuritynetwork.org/" target="_blank">Christian Security Network</a>, says churches are "soft targets." A survey conducted last year after a church shooting in Knoxville, Tennesee, showed that 75 percent of churches do not have a security plan, while polling of 250 churches conducted by his organization showed a third have already experienced a security incident this year. </p> <p>The Christian Security Network advises churches take an all-hazards approach to their security plan, accounting for everything from low-level crime to natural disasters.</p> <p>And it's not only Christian houses of worship that are taking precautions.</p> <p>Because of anti-semiticism and attacks in Israel, Jewish organizations have long been security conscious.</p> <p>"You don't want iron gates and armed guards, but houses of worship do need to train staff, congregants and ushers to identify and respond to such threats as an emotionally disturbed person," said Paul Goldenberg, national director of the <a href="http://www.scnus.org/index.aspx?page=1">Secure Community Network</a> (SCN), a Jewish security organization. </p> <p>According to <em>Security Management's </em>Laura Spadanuta last April, <a href="http://www.securitymanagement.com/article/house-worship-security-and-training-tips" target="_blank">SCN has been an innovative leader</a> in securing Jewish houses of worship through public-private partnerships. </p> <p class="rteindent1">The group receives sensitive information on threats to the Jewish community around-the-clock, which it then disseminates to its members. Goldenberg adds that the SCN is the first nongovernmental organization to have a memorandum of understanding with the New York City Police Department.</p> <p class="rteindent1">The group is also working with the Department of Homeland Security to coordinate its house of worship training. The most important step a house of worship can take is to train its staff to handle threatening situations and to ensure that they are able to operate any security equipment the building has, says Goldenberg, who was part of a south Florida undercover strike force for several years.</p> <p>The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a Muslim civil rights organization, has also published security guidelines for mosques and worshippers because of an increase in assaults after 9-11. (Click <a href="http://pa.cair.com/index.php?Page=safetykit&Side=crights" target="_blank">here </a>for CAIR-Pennsylvania's security guide.) </p> <p>For more on protecting houses of worship, see ASIS International's " <a href="http://www.asisonline.org/newsroom/surveys/HousesofWorship.pdf" target="_blank">Securing Houses of Worship</a>." </p> </div>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Active-Shooter.aspxActive Shooter Guidelines<p>​How to handle an active shooter situation is the subject of two new guidelines, including one <a href="http://www.dhs.gov/publication/active-shooter-how-to-respond" target="_blank">released by the Department of Homeland Security</a> that​ targets a more general audience of managers and employees.</p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465