Leisure and Hospitality

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Terrorists-Check-In.aspxTerrorists Check InGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-05-01T04:00:00ZAlexandre Masraff, Aude Drevon, and Emma Villard<p>​Just after 8:00 a.m. on January 25, attackers detonated a truck bomb outside the gates of the Dayah Hotel in the Somali capital of Mogadishu before storming inside. Fifteen minutes later, another truck bomb exploded, and security forces were dispatched to take control of the hotel. </p><p>The hotel, located near Somalia’s Parliament building, was said to be popular with lawmakers and government officials. That may have made it a target for the attackers—later identified as al-Shabaab, an extremist group linked to al Qaeda, whose attacks are designed to turn Somalia into a fundamentalist Islamic state.</p><p>The attack in January killed at least 21 people and injured more than 50, according to CNN. It was just the latest in a succession of recent attacks on soft targets in Africa and Europe, and it raised awareness of a global and shifting threat that no international business can ignore: the risk of an attack on a hotel where a traveling employee is staying.</p><p>Since 2002, more than 30 major terrorist attacks have targeted hotels across the world. Because of this outbreak of attacks, businesses, tourism professionals, and hoteliers themselves are calling hotel risk procedures into question.​</p><h4>Hotels as Soft Targets</h4><p>Hotels became major targets for bomb attacks by terrorists in Asia in the 2000s, and the threat has since moved to Africa. Attacks against hotels in 2015 and 2016 accounted for a third of all major terrorist attacks in the world, likely because they are considered to be soft targets.</p><p>Some hotels make more attractive targets than others, for a variety of reasons. One of these is the opportunity to harm a large number of people. Hotels are gathering places, and in addition to guests there are visitors for banquets, as well as bar, restaurant, and leisure facility customers.</p><p>Another reason a hotel might be an attractive target is that it is likely to garner international media attention. The more victims there are from different countries, the more media attention the attack is likely to generate. </p><p>Attacks on hotels also express an ideology: international luxury hotels symbolize Western culture. Jihadists often consider hotels immoral places where men and women interact, and where alcohol is easily accessible.​</p><h4>Attack Strategies</h4><p>Terrorists used three attack strategies when targeting hotels between 2002 and 2015: explosives (44.4 percent), firearms (25 percent), and a combination of the two (30.6 percent), according to the Global Terrorism Database.</p><p><strong>Explosives.</strong> There are two varieties of attacks on hotels using explosives: the human bomb and the vehicular bomb. These tend to cause the most physical destruction and injure the most people, making them effective for terrorists.</p><p>Human bombs tend to have geographically restricted limits and are mainly used in spaces that are open to guests. For instance, in November 2005 in Amman, Jordan, terrorists detonated explosive belts in the ballroom of the Radisson SAS, near the coffee shop of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, and in the entrance of a Days Inn. Fifty-seven people were killed in the attacks, and more than 100 people were wounded, according to The New York Times.</p><p>In contrast, vehicular bombs account for 31 percent of terrorist attacks on hotels. This technique is used to cause large-scale material destruction and potential chain reactions from the explosion—such as gas line bursts, fire, structural collapse, and destruction of guest and staff lists.</p><p>In 2008, for example, terrorists packed a truck with a ton of explosives and drove it into the Islamabad Marriott’s security gate. The vehicle exploded, killing 53 people and injuring 271, and officials were concerned that the building itself might collapse and cause even more injuries and damage, The Telegraph reported.</p><p>Occasionally, the two techniques are used together. One such case was in 2005 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, when terrorists set off a truck bomb near the Iberotel Palace hotel while simultaneously discharging a bomb in the façade of the Ghazala Gardens Hotel. They also detonated a third bomb in a parking lot of one of the city’s tourist areas. The coordinated attacks killed 88 people, most of whom were Egyptian instead of the targeted Western tourists, according to the Times’ analysis of the attack.</p><p><strong>Assaults. </strong>Terrorists often use the assault technique, armed with automatic rifles and hand grenades, to target hotels. This method makes it easier for the terrorists to damage a wider area while also killing a large number of people as they move through the hotel and its floors.</p><p>This kind of attack occurred in November 2015 when heavily armed and well-trained gunmen drove into the Bamako, Mali, Radisson Blu hotel compound. They detonated grenades and opened fire on security guards before taking 170 people hostage, according to The Guardian. Twenty-one people, including two militants, were killed in the attack and seven were wounded.</p><p>Terrorists will also move from one hotel to another, not hesitating to take clients hostage to make the operation last longer. The duration of the siege often has a direct impact on the amount of international media coverage the attack receives.</p><p>Additionally, some assault-style attacks show that terrorists had knowledge of the hotels before attacking them. For example, in the 2009 attacks on the Ritz-Carlton and the JW Marriott in Jakarta, the attackers blew themselves up—one in a parking garage at the Marriott and the other at a restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton. Authorities later discovered, according to the BBC, an unexploded bomb and materials in a Marriott guest room that was dubbed the “control center” for the attacks.</p><p>Terrorists also may plan to conduct attacks during a hotel’s peak operation times—such as during meals or organized events. For example, the attack in Bamako took place around 7:00 a.m. when breakfast, checkouts, and security officer shift changes were taking place.​</p><h4>Travel Policies</h4><p>Not all companies have well-developed travel security policies. Predictably, companies with employees who travel more frequently for work have a more advanced travel security program, as do companies that operate in countries with elevated security risks or in remote areas.</p><p>Companies also tend to have a more highly developed travel security program if one of their employees has been affected by a security incident, such as a hotel bombing, in the past. In this current threat environment, however, all international companies should review their travel risk policies because they have a duty to protect employees when they travel for work.</p><p>The European Directive on the Safety and Health of Workers at Work mentions this obligation, as do national regulations: Germany’s Civil Code, France’s Labor Code and a judgment by the Court of Cassation, and the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974 and the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act of 2007.</p><p>The United States also addresses this responsibility through its statutory duty of care obligations detailed in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The act requires large and medium-sized companies to define basic emergency planning requirements.</p><p>Also, depending on the U.S. state, workers’ compensation laws may have provisions for American business travelers abroad. Similar obligations apply in Australia, Belgium, The Netherlands, and Spain. And case law has reinforced this legal arsenal addressing the security of employees traveling abroad.</p><p>Under these frameworks, employers must assess foreseeable risks, inform employees of these risks, and train them to respond.</p><p>And these risks are no longer reserved for employees traveling to Africa or the Middle East; the succession of terrorist attacks in countries qualified as low-risk destinations—Berlin, Brussels, Nice, and Paris—means that many companies need to address these locations in their crisis management preparation for employees traveling abroad.</p><p>Some companies have already changed their internal procedures to address these risks, including changing the way that hotels are chosen for business travel. ​</p><h4>Choosing Hotels</h4><p>Given the current threat environment and duty of care obligations for traveling employees, corporate security managers and travel managers need to work together to choose the right hotels. No matter the choice of accommodation, security and travel managers must conduct their own risk analysis to adopt the best strategy for choosing hotels for their employees. The analysis should include the destination, the profile of the business traveler, the duration of the employee’s stay, the company’s image, and the potentially controversial nature of the project in that destination.</p><p>Once the analysis is complete, companies have four options for choosing accommodations for traveling employees: international brand hotels, regional chain hotels, apartment or house sharing, or residences that are owned and operated by the company.</p><p>The most common option is to choose hotels with an international brand whose rates have been negotiated by the company. These big-name hotels can be reassuring. However, these institutions—described by some specialists as high-profile—tend to meet terrorists’ selection criteria for targets.</p><p>These hotels are also often franchise hotels, meaning they are independent institutions, master of their own investment decisions and the management of their staff. This can make it difficult for security professionals and travel managers to get answers to important questions during the vetting process: What security procedures does the hotel have in place and what is its staff management policy? Does it subcontract its security to a guard company or have its own security team?</p><p>The second option is to choose less emblematic hotels that some would consider low-profile, such as regional chain hotels—like Azalaï, City Blue, Serena, and Tsogo Sun in Pan-Africa—or independent boutique hotels. </p><p>Hotels such as these may provide more discretion than an international brand hotel, but may come with slightly lower levels of security, which could become a problem should a crisis develop. Lesser-known hotels, for instance, may not receive as rapid a response from security forces as a luxury hotel frequented by public figures and politicians. And for travel managers, this second option could be a difficult sell to employees who might be used to staying at international brand hotels.</p><p>Another option that companies might choose is to have employees stay at a private residence through the sharing economy, such as Airbnb. Google and Morgan Stanley recently began allowing employees to use Airbnb for business travel, and the company saw 14,000 new companies sign up each week in 2016 for its business travel services, according to CNBC. </p><p>For some destinations, this is not a viable option because of the lack of accommodations, but for other locations Airbnb has numerous places to stay and even offers a dedicated website for business travelers, which make up 30 percent of its overall sales.</p><p>One location where Airbnb is a pop­ular choice is in sub-Saharan Africa where a major influx of young expatriates used to traveling and staying in Airbnbs have rooms, apartments, and houses available for business travelers.</p><p>However, this option has collateral risks, and many companies forbid employees from staying at an Airbnb while traveling because of the lack of verification and vetting of the residences, which may not allow them to meet many companies’ duty of care obligations. </p><p>Also problematic is the risk that employees will get lost while trying to locate their Airbnb, as opposed to an easily identifiable hotel. And the traveler might be unable to check in when the host is unavailable to let them in or provide a key. </p><p>The Airbnb option also raises questions for security professionals: If it’s attacked, how will local law enforcement respond? Who is responsible for contacting law enforcement?</p><p>The final option is for the company itself to provide private accommodations for its travelers. This is only cost effective, though, for high-risk destinations where companies frequently send employees to work. With this option, companies have full control over the security of the accommodations. However, this level of security comes with a high operational cost—purchasing or renting the accommodation, ensuring the maintenance of the location, and supervising essential service providers, such as housekeeping and security.</p><p>Additionally, companies that choose to provide a private accommodation for traveling employees would have the responsibility to secure the property—creating a security plan; purchasing, installing, and implementing security equipment, such as access control, CCTV, and fences; and providing security staff, either in-house or through a contract.​</p><h4>Improving Security</h4><p>In 2002, a Palestinian suicide bomber killed 30 people at a Passover Seder at the Park Hotel in Netanya, Israel, in the deadliest attack during the Second Intifada. Following the attack, Israel’s hotel industry led the charge to address security threats by tightening security regulations. These regulations required the hospitality industry to staff a chief security officer in each hotel, led to the development of dedicated educational programs on security with recognized diplomas, and ultimately provided career opportunities for skilled and motivated security professionals.    </p><p>This model is one where companies can support hoteliers by including security as a key element when choosing which hotels can be used by employees on business trips.  </p><p><em><strong>Alexandre Masraff </strong>is a security and crisis management senior advisor at Onyx International Consulting & Services Ltd. and the cofounder of the InSCeHo certification program that focuses on hotel security. He is a member of ASIS International. <strong>Aude Drevon</strong> is a security analyst with a master’s degree in geopolitics and international security. <strong>Emma Villard</strong> is a regional security advisor based in Vienna, Austria, and a member of ASIS.     ​</em></p>

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Terrorists-Check-In.aspxTerrorists Check In<p>​Just after 8:00 a.m. on January 25, attackers detonated a truck bomb outside the gates of the Dayah Hotel in the Somali capital of Mogadishu before storming inside. Fifteen minutes later, another truck bomb exploded, and security forces were dispatched to take control of the hotel. </p><p>The hotel, located near Somalia’s Parliament building, was said to be popular with lawmakers and government officials. That may have made it a target for the attackers—later identified as al-Shabaab, an extremist group linked to al Qaeda, whose attacks are designed to turn Somalia into a fundamentalist Islamic state.</p><p>The attack in January killed at least 21 people and injured more than 50, according to CNN. It was just the latest in a succession of recent attacks on soft targets in Africa and Europe, and it raised awareness of a global and shifting threat that no international business can ignore: the risk of an attack on a hotel where a traveling employee is staying.</p><p>Since 2002, more than 30 major terrorist attacks have targeted hotels across the world. Because of this outbreak of attacks, businesses, tourism professionals, and hoteliers themselves are calling hotel risk procedures into question.​</p><h4>Hotels as Soft Targets</h4><p>Hotels became major targets for bomb attacks by terrorists in Asia in the 2000s, and the threat has since moved to Africa. Attacks against hotels in 2015 and 2016 accounted for a third of all major terrorist attacks in the world, likely because they are considered to be soft targets.</p><p>Some hotels make more attractive targets than others, for a variety of reasons. One of these is the opportunity to harm a large number of people. Hotels are gathering places, and in addition to guests there are visitors for banquets, as well as bar, restaurant, and leisure facility customers.</p><p>Another reason a hotel might be an attractive target is that it is likely to garner international media attention. The more victims there are from different countries, the more media attention the attack is likely to generate. </p><p>Attacks on hotels also express an ideology: international luxury hotels symbolize Western culture. Jihadists often consider hotels immoral places where men and women interact, and where alcohol is easily accessible.​</p><h4>Attack Strategies</h4><p>Terrorists used three attack strategies when targeting hotels between 2002 and 2015: explosives (44.4 percent), firearms (25 percent), and a combination of the two (30.6 percent), according to the Global Terrorism Database.</p><p><strong>Explosives.</strong> There are two varieties of attacks on hotels using explosives: the human bomb and the vehicular bomb. These tend to cause the most physical destruction and injure the most people, making them effective for terrorists.</p><p>Human bombs tend to have geographically restricted limits and are mainly used in spaces that are open to guests. For instance, in November 2005 in Amman, Jordan, terrorists detonated explosive belts in the ballroom of the Radisson SAS, near the coffee shop of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, and in the entrance of a Days Inn. Fifty-seven people were killed in the attacks, and more than 100 people were wounded, according to The New York Times.</p><p>In contrast, vehicular bombs account for 31 percent of terrorist attacks on hotels. This technique is used to cause large-scale material destruction and potential chain reactions from the explosion—such as gas line bursts, fire, structural collapse, and destruction of guest and staff lists.</p><p>In 2008, for example, terrorists packed a truck with a ton of explosives and drove it into the Islamabad Marriott’s security gate. The vehicle exploded, killing 53 people and injuring 271, and officials were concerned that the building itself might collapse and cause even more injuries and damage, The Telegraph reported.</p><p>Occasionally, the two techniques are used together. One such case was in 2005 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, when terrorists set off a truck bomb near the Iberotel Palace hotel while simultaneously discharging a bomb in the façade of the Ghazala Gardens Hotel. They also detonated a third bomb in a parking lot of one of the city’s tourist areas. The coordinated attacks killed 88 people, most of whom were Egyptian instead of the targeted Western tourists, according to the Times’ analysis of the attack.</p><p><strong>Assaults. </strong>Terrorists often use the assault technique, armed with automatic rifles and hand grenades, to target hotels. This method makes it easier for the terrorists to damage a wider area while also killing a large number of people as they move through the hotel and its floors.</p><p>This kind of attack occurred in November 2015 when heavily armed and well-trained gunmen drove into the Bamako, Mali, Radisson Blu hotel compound. They detonated grenades and opened fire on security guards before taking 170 people hostage, according to The Guardian. Twenty-one people, including two militants, were killed in the attack and seven were wounded.</p><p>Terrorists will also move from one hotel to another, not hesitating to take clients hostage to make the operation last longer. The duration of the siege often has a direct impact on the amount of international media coverage the attack receives.</p><p>Additionally, some assault-style attacks show that terrorists had knowledge of the hotels before attacking them. For example, in the 2009 attacks on the Ritz-Carlton and the JW Marriott in Jakarta, the attackers blew themselves up—one in a parking garage at the Marriott and the other at a restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton. Authorities later discovered, according to the BBC, an unexploded bomb and materials in a Marriott guest room that was dubbed the “control center” for the attacks.</p><p>Terrorists also may plan to conduct attacks during a hotel’s peak operation times—such as during meals or organized events. For example, the attack in Bamako took place around 7:00 a.m. when breakfast, checkouts, and security officer shift changes were taking place.​</p><h4>Travel Policies</h4><p>Not all companies have well-developed travel security policies. Predictably, companies with employees who travel more frequently for work have a more advanced travel security program, as do companies that operate in countries with elevated security risks or in remote areas.</p><p>Companies also tend to have a more highly developed travel security program if one of their employees has been affected by a security incident, such as a hotel bombing, in the past. In this current threat environment, however, all international companies should review their travel risk policies because they have a duty to protect employees when they travel for work.</p><p>The European Directive on the Safety and Health of Workers at Work mentions this obligation, as do national regulations: Germany’s Civil Code, France’s Labor Code and a judgment by the Court of Cassation, and the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974 and the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act of 2007.</p><p>The United States also addresses this responsibility through its statutory duty of care obligations detailed in the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The act requires large and medium-sized companies to define basic emergency planning requirements.</p><p>Also, depending on the U.S. state, workers’ compensation laws may have provisions for American business travelers abroad. Similar obligations apply in Australia, Belgium, The Netherlands, and Spain. And case law has reinforced this legal arsenal addressing the security of employees traveling abroad.</p><p>Under these frameworks, employers must assess foreseeable risks, inform employees of these risks, and train them to respond.</p><p>And these risks are no longer reserved for employees traveling to Africa or the Middle East; the succession of terrorist attacks in countries qualified as low-risk destinations—Berlin, Brussels, Nice, and Paris—means that many companies need to address these locations in their crisis management preparation for employees traveling abroad.</p><p>Some companies have already changed their internal procedures to address these risks, including changing the way that hotels are chosen for business travel. ​</p><h4>Choosing Hotels</h4><p>Given the current threat environment and duty of care obligations for traveling employees, corporate security managers and travel managers need to work together to choose the right hotels. No matter the choice of accommodation, security and travel managers must conduct their own risk analysis to adopt the best strategy for choosing hotels for their employees. The analysis should include the destination, the profile of the business traveler, the duration of the employee’s stay, the company’s image, and the potentially controversial nature of the project in that destination.</p><p>Once the analysis is complete, companies have four options for choosing accommodations for traveling employees: international brand hotels, regional chain hotels, apartment or house sharing, or residences that are owned and operated by the company.</p><p>The most common option is to choose hotels with an international brand whose rates have been negotiated by the company. These big-name hotels can be reassuring. However, these institutions—described by some specialists as high-profile—tend to meet terrorists’ selection criteria for targets.</p><p>These hotels are also often franchise hotels, meaning they are independent institutions, master of their own investment decisions and the management of their staff. This can make it difficult for security professionals and travel managers to get answers to important questions during the vetting process: What security procedures does the hotel have in place and what is its staff management policy? Does it subcontract its security to a guard company or have its own security team?</p><p>The second option is to choose less emblematic hotels that some would consider low-profile, such as regional chain hotels—like Azalaï, City Blue, Serena, and Tsogo Sun in Pan-Africa—or independent boutique hotels. </p><p>Hotels such as these may provide more discretion than an international brand hotel, but may come with slightly lower levels of security, which could become a problem should a crisis develop. Lesser-known hotels, for instance, may not receive as rapid a response from security forces as a luxury hotel frequented by public figures and politicians. And for travel managers, this second option could be a difficult sell to employees who might be used to staying at international brand hotels.</p><p>Another option that companies might choose is to have employees stay at a private residence through the sharing economy, such as Airbnb. Google and Morgan Stanley recently began allowing employees to use Airbnb for business travel, and the company saw 14,000 new companies sign up each week in 2016 for its business travel services, according to CNBC. </p><p>For some destinations, this is not a viable option because of the lack of accommodations, but for other locations Airbnb has numerous places to stay and even offers a dedicated website for business travelers, which make up 30 percent of its overall sales.</p><p>One location where Airbnb is a pop­ular choice is in sub-Saharan Africa where a major influx of young expatriates used to traveling and staying in Airbnbs have rooms, apartments, and houses available for business travelers.</p><p>However, this option has collateral risks, and many companies forbid employees from staying at an Airbnb while traveling because of the lack of verification and vetting of the residences, which may not allow them to meet many companies’ duty of care obligations. </p><p>Also problematic is the risk that employees will get lost while trying to locate their Airbnb, as opposed to an easily identifiable hotel. And the traveler might be unable to check in when the host is unavailable to let them in or provide a key. </p><p>The Airbnb option also raises questions for security professionals: If it’s attacked, how will local law enforcement respond? Who is responsible for contacting law enforcement?</p><p>The final option is for the company itself to provide private accommodations for its travelers. This is only cost effective, though, for high-risk destinations where companies frequently send employees to work. With this option, companies have full control over the security of the accommodations. However, this level of security comes with a high operational cost—purchasing or renting the accommodation, ensuring the maintenance of the location, and supervising essential service providers, such as housekeeping and security.</p><p>Additionally, companies that choose to provide a private accommodation for traveling employees would have the responsibility to secure the property—creating a security plan; purchasing, installing, and implementing security equipment, such as access control, CCTV, and fences; and providing security staff, either in-house or through a contract.​</p><h4>Improving Security</h4><p>In 2002, a Palestinian suicide bomber killed 30 people at a Passover Seder at the Park Hotel in Netanya, Israel, in the deadliest attack during the Second Intifada. Following the attack, Israel’s hotel industry led the charge to address security threats by tightening security regulations. These regulations required the hospitality industry to staff a chief security officer in each hotel, led to the development of dedicated educational programs on security with recognized diplomas, and ultimately provided career opportunities for skilled and motivated security professionals.    </p><p>This model is one where companies can support hoteliers by including security as a key element when choosing which hotels can be used by employees on business trips.  </p><p><em><strong>Alexandre Masraff </strong>is a security and crisis management senior advisor at Onyx International Consulting & Services Ltd. and the cofounder of the InSCeHo certification program that focuses on hotel security. He is a member of ASIS International. <strong>Aude Drevon</strong> is a security analyst with a master’s degree in geopolitics and international security. <strong>Emma Villard</strong> is a regional security advisor based in Vienna, Austria, and a member of ASIS.     ​</em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/negligent-security-0012815.aspxCourt Case: Negligent Security<div class="body">  </div><p class="body">The family of a civilian contractor who was killed during the terrorist attack against the Marriot Islamabad hotel in 2008, filed a negligent security lawsuit claiming that Marriot failed to protect its guests and employees. A federal appeals court has dismissed the lawsuit on the grounds that the case must be brought in Pakistan, where the attack occurred.</p><div class="body"><ul><li><a href="/ASIS%20SM%20Documents/DiFederico_v_Marriott%20International.pdf">DiFederico_v_Marriott International.pdf</a></li></ul></div><p> </p> GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-December-2016.aspxIndustry News December 2016<h4>​Little League Safety</h4><p>The Little League Baseball World Series took place in August in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. All-star teams of 11- to 13-year-olds from across the United States and around the world competed in the tournament.</p><p>As it has for the past 18 years, Lenel had a hand in keeping the games safe and secure. Lenel mobile apps allowed on-site officers to monitor and share video, and Interlogix technology helped protect the on-site police station. </p><p>Upon arrival, each player, staff member, volunteer, and vendor enrolled in the Lenel OnGuard system and received a photo identification badge for use during the series. The personalized badges allowed entry to selected areas of the facility. Only players and select staff were allowed access to the dormitory areas. The access control system tapped into the video system, presenting a live video feed and the cardholder’s database photo for easy identification by security guards.</p><p>Idesco provided its XXL 2.0 ID card printer for the event. The oversized ID badge printer printed more than 700 ID badges so security staff could visually identify members of the media.​</p><h4>PARTNERSHIPS AND DEALS</h4><p>Texas Health Huguley Hospital is using access control from 3xLOGIC and planning to expand the system to cover 170 doors and 1,800 users.</p><p>Appiphany Technologies provided anti-counterfeit device units for the Major League Sports Association’s licensed apparel vendors.</p><p>ASSA ABLOY announced the integration of its Aperio wireless lock technology with all editions of Tyco Security Products Kantech EntraPass Security Software 7.0. </p><p>Avigilon Corporation announced that its video surveillance cameras, network video recorders, and video management software helped monitor the 2016 Summer Olympic Games held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.</p><p>The Cliff Lodge and Spa at Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort in Utah replaced its former double sliding door entrance with a Boon Edam Duotour automatic revolving door. </p><p>Digi Security Systems partnered with Axis Communications to offer customers a wider range of video security camera products across all industries and applications.</p><p>DirectView Security was chosen by Accumulators, Inc., to install a surveillance and security system for a new manufacturing facility in Houston, Texas.</p><p>Dortronics Systems Inc. appointed two new sales organizations: Repworks for the New England territory and Campion Sales for Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas.</p><p>Flashpoint integrated its Flashpoint Business Risk Intelligence with IBM i2 Enterprise Insight Analysis to leverage data, tools, and expertise for a safe view of the risks emanating from the Dark Web.</p><p>GIACT Systems and Emailage Corp. formed a business partnership that will enhance fraud and payment risk management solutions.</p><p>International SOS and Everbridge announced a strategic partnership to deliver critical information to employees and mobile workforces.</p><p>ID Solutions selected the Kantech hattrix cloud-based access control service to remotely manage its multistate network of properties. The hattrix service allows ID Solutions to outsource security system support and maintenance to its systems integrator, California Commercial Security.</p><p>LaaSer Critical Communications formed a strategic alliance with West to improve location determination and call routing for the 911 ecosystem.</p><p>Safety technology company NaviGate Prepared partnered with Clever to make it simpler for schools to use its school safety application.</p><p>BT Skyrise, a developer of IT solutions for smart cities, chose Nedap vehicle identification and detection systems to improve parking. The new Parkanizer platform was introduced in the Polish city Piekary Slaskie.</p><p>Designed and built by North American Video, a surveillance system upgrade puts the LCO Casino, Lodge, and Convention Center on the path to an IP system.</p><p>Nuctech security scanners were used to protect the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro during the 2016 Summer Olympics.</p><p>Ocularis 5 from OnSSI is now compatible with Pelco Optera Multi Sensor panoramic cameras. </p><p>Open Options announced an integration with Allegion’s Schlage NDE series wireless locks with ENGAGE technology.</p><p>PSA Security Network and Welbeck Secure entered into a partnership to distribute Welbeck’s network connection and management solutions for the security industry.</p><p>RADA Electronic Industries will provide its CHR-based RPS-10 radar system to Artis LLC. for integration with its Iron Curtain close-in active protection system.</p><p>React Mobile announced that Seat­tle University implemented the React Dispatch Console to help security professionals quickly identify incidents, shorten response times, and document events. </p><p>The Boston Globe renewed its use of the In Case of Crisis mobile app from RockDove Solutions.</p><p>SecurityScorecard is collaborating with Columbia University’s Data Science Institute on various data science and machine learning projects to build breach prediction models.</p><p>Securus Technologies expanded the terms of its marketing agreement with Corrisoft, LLC, and can now offer Corrisoft’s smartphone-based offender monitoring solution to its customers.</p><p>TradeMaster announced an integration partnership with reporting and records management software company Emergency Reporting.  </p><p>ZKAccess received Lenel factory certification and has joined the Lenel OpenAccess Alliance Program.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>Hamilton School District in Hamilton, Montana, installed the 3xLOGIC Intelli-M Access browser-based access control management solution at all of the district’s buildings.</p><p>ChemImage Sensor Systems announced that it will design, fabricate, and test sensors designed to detect and locate chemical warfare agents for the U.S. Army.</p><p>Franklin County Public Schools in Virginia will implement the COPsync911 threat-alert system. </p><p>EF Johnson Technologies, Inc., signed a contract with Erie County, Pennsylvania, to upgrade and manage its radio network.</p><p>Uttar Pradesh Police in India selected an integrated suite of public safety software from Hexagon Safety & Infra­structure to enhance call handling, officer dispatching, and agencywide reporting in India’s most populous state. </p><p>McMurdo, Inc., was awarded a contract by the U.S. Coast Guard to supply personal locator beacons to enhance crew safety in the event of emergencies.</p><p>South East Water, based in Melbourne, Australia, upgraded its monitoring systems with a video surveillance platform from Milestone Systems and network cameras from Axis Communications.</p><p>NAPCO Security Technologies, Inc., announced that Paoli Community School System in Indiana selected NAPCO’s ArchiTech Series Locks to be installed in its schools. </p><p>Newtown Public School District in Connecticut implemented a cloud-based school safety system from NaviGate Prepared.</p><p>The Procurement Office of the German Federal Ministry of the Interior signed an agreement with Rohde & Schwarz for 300 R&S QPS200 security scanners to be used everywhere that the German Federal Police Force performs security checks.</p><p>Shelby Township, Michigan, implemented PowerPhone’s Total Response solution for 911 call handling. </p><p>The Safariland Group provided equipment to the New York City Police Department to protect law enforcement personnel from ballistic threats.</p><p>Siklu was selected to provide a wireless connectivity solution for a citywide surveillance system in downtown Fort Myers,  Florida.</p><p>USmax Corporation was awarded General Services Administration Schedule 84 listing to provide services in security systems integration and design services and law enforcement/security training.</p><p>Utility, Inc., announced that the Clayton County Police Department of Georgia will deploy its BodyWorn body cameras, as well as Rocket IoT-X devices for in-car communication. </p><p>The Mato Grosso State Court of Justice in Brazil is conducting a pilot program using a Vision-Box portable solution to improve personal identification processes in criminal hearings. </p><p>Witt O’Brien’s is working with the Texas Department of State Health Services to develop preparedness plans to mitigate risks associated with high-consequence infectious diseases.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>Open Connector video event management software and event-driven intelligence tool from Arteco is a recipient of this year’s Campus Safety magazine BEST Award in the category of video surveillance solutions.</p><p>The Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs named Dallmeier one of Bayerns Best 50 for the third consecutive year.</p><p>Delta Scientific announced that its HD2055 barrier met the criteria of the U.S. Department of State for continuous operations of 1 million cycles. </p><p>Elbit Systems of America, LLC, won the Most Notable Border Security Program Award from Government Security News for the Integrated Fixed Tower deployment to the U.S. Border Patrol. </p><p>Galaxy Control Systems received approval from the American Institute of Architects as a provider of education classes under the organization’s continuing education system.</p><p>GET Group North America received FIPS 201 Certification for its CP500 Identification Card Printer.</p><p>HALTER (Horse and Livestock Team Emergency Response), a Sonoma County, California–based grassroots initiative, is a recipient of the 2016 Federal Emergency Management Administration Individual and Community Preparedness Award in the awareness to action category.</p><p>Medeco Security Locks won a Cam­pus Safety BEST Award. Its Medeco XT Data Analytics was recognized in the access control and identity management category. </p><p>SignalSense was a Gold Winner in the security software—innovations category in the 2016 Golden Bridge Awards. SignalSense was also named the Silver Medalist in the Puget Sound Business Journal list of Washington’s Best Workplaces in the category of businesses with 10 to 49 employees. </p><p>Tyco Security Products announced that its C•CURE 9000 security and event management platform was honored as the Benchmark Innovation Awards 2016 winner in the access control (software) category by Benchmark Magazine in the United Kingdom.</p><p>The newest security keypad and smart card readers from XAC Automation Corporation successfully passed the PCI-PTS 4.1 certification requirements.​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>Canada’s railways released a promotional video about TRANSCAER—the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response initiative—led by the Chemistry Industry Associa­tion of Canada and the Railway Association of Canada to inform communities about the products being transported through their area and provide free training to emergency responders on how to handle a transportation incident involving dangerous goods. </p><p>CoventBridge Group Ltd., the firm created by the merger of GlobalOptions and ICS Merrill, acquired R-ISC Investigation & Surveillance Company Ltd.</p><p>Eagle Eye Networks awarded $1.25 million in Drako Cloud Security Grants to schools throughout the United States, providing a camera system at no cost for one year.</p><p>Flir Systems, Inc., acquired Armasight, Inc., a developer of precision sporting and military optics products.</p><p>Hikvision Canada Inc., launched a new website at www.hikvision.ca.</p><p>IoT solutions company home2net GmbH introduced its new brand name h2n to reflect its increased focus on industrial customers. </p><p>IBM Security announced the formation of IBM X-Force Red, a group of security professionals and ethical hackers whose goal is to help businesses discover vulnerabilities in their computer networks, hardware, and software applications before cybercriminals do. </p><p>Mars Petcare and Whistle are donating Whistle GPS Pet Trackers for all K-9 officers in the Greenwood Police Department, Fort Smith Police Department, and Sebastian County Sherriff’s Department in Arkansas.</p><p>Midwest Alarm Services has acquired Electric Specialties Company of Omaha, Nebraska.</p><p>Nestlé opened the Nestlé Quality Assurance Center in Dublin, Ohio, which is designed to improve the verification of food safety and quality standards and provide support for the implementation and maintenance of food safety programs. </p><p>ONVIF release Profile Q, the specification that features quick and easy discovery, set-up, and configuration of ONVIF-conformant devices.</p><p>Princeton Identity Inc., formerly a line of business of SRI International marketed under the SRI Identity brand, launched operation as an independent company.</p><p>Tyco signed a definitive agreement to sell its security business in South Africa, which operates locally under the ADT brand, to Fidelity Security Group.</p>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465