Leisure and Hospitality

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/House-Rules.aspxQ&A: House RulesGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-09-01T04:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/holly-gilbert-stowell.aspx, Holly Gilbert Stowell<p><strong><em>​Q. How are gaming security professionals leveraging technology to protect their assets? </em></strong></p><p><strong>A. </strong>While the protection of gaming assets is important, what about the nongaming areas of the operation such as food and beverage outlets, nightclubs, bars, lounges, and retail outlets? Many security professionals believe the second most-observed area for surveillance personnel should be food and beverage. Data from Moody’s Investors Service from September 2016 said that nongaming revenue was 55 to 65 percent of the revenue of a gaming property, with food and beverage being the largest portion of that. So no matter what city or property patrons visit, of the disposable income that people bring to the gaming industry, it appears that the food and beverage revenue is becoming at least as important to casinos as the gaming revenue. </p><p>To more closely monitor losses and possible theft in the food and beverage departments, security teams can leverage an effective point-of-sale control solution that is integrated with a hotel and casino’s surveillance recording system, which identifies errors in procedures and theft.</p><p>With a point-of-sale (POS) terminal, you basically have a cashier device of some type, such as a register. That transmits data to the server, where the data is analyzed and stored. Depending on what the food and beverage management team wants and what their parameters are, the POS generates reports. For example, if you’re talking about a bar, you have data on who the employee is, the time of day, what drink was ordered, what drink was served, what food was ordered, and what food was served. The solution takes that data and overlays it with the video of that POS terminal. You can go back and see what the employee is actually ringing up, and what their actions are compared to what the electronic data is coming out of that POS–and hopefully they are going to match. If you see any anomalies in the data, then you can go back and watch what actually happened, which is very helpful in catching any improper actions, mistakes, or thefts.</p><p><br></p><p><strong><em>Q. Some thieves have learned to steal thousands of dollars by hacking and cheating slot machines. How can these incidents be avoided? </em></strong></p><p><strong>A. </strong>In 2009, virtually all gambling was outlawed in Russia, so the casinos there had to sell their slot machines to whoever would buy them. A lot of their machines wound up in organized crime groups. In 2011 the casinos in Europe started noticing certain brands of slot machines that were losing large amounts of money, but no physical cheating was noticed. That led to the theory that maybe the cheaters had figured out a way to predict slot machine behavior. </p><p>It was later discovered that cheaters were uploading footage of slot machines  to technical staff in Russia. Someone would analyze the video, calculate the machine’s spin pattern, somehow interfering with or being able to determine that slot machine model in their pseudo-random number generator, and send a reply back to the cheater. This information would set certain markers for their play, giving them a better-than-average idea of when the machines were going to hit. </p><p>In the United States, law enforcement investigations led to the arrest of one Russian national in California in a casino in July 2014 who was engaging in this sort of cheating. The FBI later indicted all four individuals involved in the ring. </p><p>To give you an idea of the potential losses, the Russian cheaters tried to limit their winnings to less than $1,000 per incident, but a four-person team working multiple casinos could earn upwards of a quarter of a million dollars a week. </p><p>While some responsibility falls on the slot machine manufacturing company, the basic protection effort is still on the casino surveillance and security personnel. It’s up to them to follow up with surveillance observations and review that slot machine play to see if there’s anything that does not match up with the daily slot exception reports, which highlight unusually large losses.  </p><p><br></p><p><strong><em>Q. We’ve seen armed robberies take place at gaming properties over the years, most recently at a casino in Manila where 36 people died. What is being done to combat those incidents? </em></strong></p><p><strong>A.</strong> Armed robberies in the industry are a concern; they don’t happen that frequently, but they are very troubling when they do. In June of this year in Gardena, California, two men followed a victim who had just won a large sum of money from a casino and rammed into the back of his vehicle to create an accident as he left the property. When he pulled into a gas station to look at the damage to his car, they robbed him of his cash winnings and shot him four times. Fortunately, the victim survived. </p><p>And then you have the shooting in Manila. It was an active shooter situation where 36 people died. The motive for that individual? Also robbery. How do we prevent things like that? It’s very difficult. Most of the robberies occur at night, and most of the casino hotels are so large they have multiple entrances and exits. </p><p>For cage [money-handling area] robberies, the training is, give the subjects the money, don’t cause any problems, and hit the holdup alarm when the robber leaves your window. And you want him to get away—you want him to get out of the property, especially if he is armed. We don’t want our security personnel to try to stop them. We notify law enforcement and let them handle it. </p><p>You need to look at the scheduling of your security staff during hours of darkness, and you may want to increase the external patrols during those times. If you have winners who have large amounts of winnings, you may want to encourage them to take a check rather than cash. If they decide to take cash, offer them an escort to their mode of transportation. Most of the time it’s their own personal vehicle, so offer them a security escort to their vehicle. </p><p>If properties don’t already do it, they may want to consider posting a security officer by the cage. A lot of casinos have security podiums for public relations and assistance for guests that are located by the cage and serve as a deterrent. And finally, you can use plainclothes officers to be on the lookout for any unusual activity.</p><p><br></p><p><strong><em>Q. How has the active shooter trend affected gaming security? Are more properties deciding to arm their guards? </em></strong></p><p><strong>A. </strong>One trend is that some gaming regulators are now requiring a copy of a licensee’s active shooter plan. The Mississippi Gaming Commission, for example, recently announced such a policy. Some casino companies are also considering arming some of their security force to be able to quickly react to an active shooter situation, if state law allows it. In many jurisdictions where gaming is a business, the state regulations do not allow security to be armed. </p><p>The approach has some pros and cons, and I would not disagree with any of my peers on what their decisions might be to protect their company. </p><p>Most active shooter situations are over in 11 minutes if it’s not a hostage situation, and in many cases first responders from law enforcement can’t get there that quickly. Sometimes they do, but if you had individuals on site, obviously their response would be much quicker. </p><p>Now your armed response team could contain and neutralize an active shooter, but they also have to be cognizant of what is lawful for a citizen’s reaction to such a violent situation. State laws pretty much dictate when deadly force can be used against an armed suspect. So if you’re going to arm these personnel, you have to be sure to operate within whatever your state law says about using deadly force on an individual.</p><p><br></p><p><strong>Q. What are the pros and cons of arming plainclothes officers?</strong></p><p><em>A. </em> If your armed security guards are in uniform, that could be a deterrent to an active shooter in and of itself. But if your armed officers are in plainclothes they can blend in with the customers, concealing the fact that they’re armed. One of the disadvantages of such a policy—and this is strictly my opinion—how are your law enforcement first responders going to be able to identify a plainclothes security officer as a friendly with a gun in his hand? For law enforcement personnel responding to an active shooter, their first goal is to neutralize that shooter. And if they come into a property and you’ve got one of your plainclothes security officers standing with a weapon, it’s quite possible they’re going to be neutralized by law enforcement, which is not good.</p><p>You also need to take a look at how your security personnel with weapons are trained to respond. This training has to be thorough, the policies and procedures must be able to withstand legal scrutiny. How are security personnel trained in the use of firearms? What’s the selection process for such officers? Are they retired or former law enforcement personnel, are they military personnel? Finally, what’s your lability if one of your security personnel accidentally shoots an innocent bystander in a situation like that? All these things must be considered when deciding whether to arm officers.   ​</p>

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/negligent-security-0012815.aspxCourt Case: Negligent Security<div class="body">  </div><p class="body">The family of a civilian contractor who was killed during the terrorist attack against the Marriot Islamabad hotel in 2008, filed a negligent security lawsuit claiming that Marriot failed to protect its guests and employees. A federal appeals court has dismissed the lawsuit on the grounds that the case must be brought in Pakistan, where the attack occurred.</p><div class="body"><ul><li><a href="/ASIS%20SM%20Documents/DiFederico_v_Marriott%20International.pdf">DiFederico_v_Marriott International.pdf</a></li></ul></div><p> </p> GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Hands-on-Solutions.aspxHands-on Solutions<p>​</p><p>BIOMETRICS HAVE BEEN MANDATED IN recent years for use in ports, border crossings, and some high-security agency facilities as a way to enhance access controls by strengthening identification. One program, the Department of Defense-run Common Access Card, which includes a smart card containing a user’s biometric, has issued several million new identifications.</p><p>Private industry applications have been limited, especially in the United States. But some end users have seen value in the technology. Japan, for instance, has tens of thousands of automatic teller machines that use vascular, or vein, recognition.</p><p>The technology continues to develop in areas such as accuracy and usability. Among the developments are biometrics with three-dimensional imaging, which can significantly improve accuracy and enrollment rates, and fingerprint scanners that provide contactless access, boosting accuracy and hygiene.</p><p>A wider assortment of organizations is eyeing biometrics as these technologies become more affordable and user-friendly and as concerns about fraud spotlight the need for stronger security. Growing adoption by companies such as retail stores, fitness centers, and fast food chains may in fact be one of the biggest current biometric trends, says Bill Nagel, a Forrester Research analyst.</p><p>Companies in these sectors are also finding biometric technology viable for HR purposes, such as time and attendance, Nagel says. A growing number of them are recognizing how biometrics can curtail policy abuses, such as “buddy punching,” in which two customers or employees share access cards.</p><p>Another impetus for adoption is that fingerprint scanners that can be plugged into a computer or terminal have come down in price. Vascular solutions, though slightly more costly, are also winning wider appeal for characteristics including accuracy, high enrollment rates, and their more hygienic, contactless nature.</p><p>Biometrics could also be making some modest headway against another challenge: privacy concerns, Nagel says. When smart cards are employed with biometrics, privacy concerns are reduced as users carry the biometric with them, but biometric/smart card solutions tend to be relatively expensive.</p><p>Some users become less concerned about other kinds of implementations when they learn that most databases only store an algorithm, or mathematical hash, of physical characteristics. It might contain 20 to 50 data points, Nagel says. “There is no way to reverse engineer [an identity] from so little data.”</p><p>Moreover, as employers and consumers have a chance to use biometric applications, they tend to appreciate the technology’s simplicity, he says. In more instances, “the convenience factor is starting to outweigh the cultural [resistance] factor.”</p><p>To illustrate how biometrics can be implemented, Security Management looks at two cases, at a fitness club and a fast food restaurant, where biometric adoption appears to be generating security as well as other benefits.</p><p>Members Only <br>St. Louis-based Club Fitness had relied for years on proximity cards for member access to its 16 locations. But in the past few years, perhaps due partly to the economy, it became increasingly clear that customers were sharing cards. “We were seeing a lot of the same people...but not really,” says Rich Quin, director of IT. The club, in early 2008, was also moving most of its centers to 24-hour access, which also created a need for a more secure access solution.</p><p>Quin says he had heard for a year or so prior that biometric technology was becoming less expensive and more usable. He started researching solutions, including iris scanners. One product, costing about $12,000 to install per location, was clearly too expensive, Quin says. He also researched some vascular solutions. He knew they could be used by a large diverse group of people. “I wanted a product that worked for the masses,” he says.</p><p>Quin also liked vascular solutions’ reputation for accuracy. Among biometric solutions, vein and iris scanners are generally best at avoiding the most false negatives and positives, according to a recent Frost & Sullivan report.</p><p>As a part of his research, Quin participated in a Webinar with vascular biometric vendor Identica Holdings of Tampa, Florida. Quin says he was impressed by the speed (or throughput) for users once they were registered. Users could present a hand, have it verified against a back office database, and gain access in under a second, “almost too fast to time.”</p><p>Quin says he considered two versions of Identica’s vascular system, called VP-II. One worked with proximity cards that typically grant access with radio-frequency identification technology. Another VP-II version worked with smart cards. The latter had a handful of additional features and enhancements, Quin says, but was considerably more expensive than the proximity card system.</p><p>The former cost about $3,400 compared to about $2,400 for the latter. Lower-end smart cards are not appreciably more expensive than proximity cards, Quin says, but it would be expensive to replace Club Fitness’ current proximity cards.</p><p>In addition to the reader, the VP-II system consists of Identica software called IONcontrol, which includes a biometric template manager, a time and attendance data repository, and a Web-based management interface. A test showed he could successfully and quickly integrate the system with Club Fitness’ current access system.</p><p>Installation. Before installing the readers, Quin started with some back-end configuration. After loading Identica’s software, he began plugging in readers. The software would scan the local network, identifying the device. The brief configuration included assigning each unit an Internet Protocol (IP) address and a name to help with identification.</p><p>After labeling individual units, he installed them in 16 locations in about a day. Physically installing the devices, including drilling holes for screws and wires, took about as long as it does with regular proximity readers, Quin says. It was helpful that Identica had been reducing the reader’s size, he says.</p><p>Enrollment. Quin first enrolled the centers’ managers. This began with Quin identifying himself to the system. Managers would then insert their proximity cards and present the back of their hand twice. The infrared scanner would capture an image, transform it into an algorithm, and store it on a network server. The process takes about a minute, according to Quin.</p><p>Some managers were initially resistant to the use of biometrics. But Quin explained the advantages of the stronger access controls, including better late-night safety.</p><p>Quin hoped that once he registered managers, they would then train their staff; center staff would then enroll customers. Identica registration would occur after customers had filled out paper work and received a proximity card.</p><p>As the transition to the new system began, a few members voiced privacy concerns, Quin says. Such concerns were reduced, however, when Quin or a manager would describe how Identica stored no actual physical image and also how vein biometrics had no government or other centralized databases.</p><p>Many centers kept their Identica systems dormant for a week or two to allow time to register new and existing users. As the system went live, however, many genuine members were locked out, Quin says. Many had not been brought into the new system.</p><p>The company solved the problem by giving managers a financial incentive. Senior management explained that lockouts could start to affect the amount of commission managers received.</p><p>Results. The system quickly produced positive results. A few weeks after installation, many facilities experienced nonmembers trying to enter in vain. Some said they had the wrong card; some didn’t return; others signed up for a paid membership. The system had successfully helped eliminate freeloaders.</p><p>Fast Solution<br>Tar Heel Capital of Boone, North Carolina, is one of the country’s largest Wendy’s restaurant franchise owners. Like similar establishments, Wendy’s had a policy requiring managers at all stores to approve voids and transaction changes. Managers also needed to approve bank or credit card transactions when two transactions with the same card occurred in quick succession. This rule was aimed mainly at protecting against “double swiping,” in which sales staff can ring an unauthorized charge without customer’s knowledge after ringing the legitimate charge for which the customer has handed over the card.</p><p>Managers would approve a transaction by swiping their own card through the terminal. But the company’s managers had magnetic swipe cards that could not be directly tied to each manager, which made the policies hard to enforce. Cards were easily misused because they were left lying around by managers or because they were stolen or intentionally shared. The company was also spending considerable sums replacing lost cards, each of which cost about $1 without shipping.</p><p>Tar Heel Capital wanted to address these issues. It also sought a way of better monitoring and enforcing time and attendance among its 2,800 employees.</p><p>Rob Ireland, Tar Heel Capital’s IT director, had been hearing about how some similar businesses had been alleviating such problems with biometric solutions. Ireland also says that the company had recently brought on a new top-level executive who had expressed interest in biometrics. Nonetheless, he began looking into the issue with a degree of skepticism, because he thought that any solution would be too costly and complex.</p><p>After some initial research, he concluded that fingerprint scanners would be least costly. He looked at some point-of-sale (POS) terminals with built-in scanners, but he found that replacing the company’s terminals would be too expensive. Fingerprint solutions that could plug into terminals via USB would be far less expensive overall.</p><p>A technology vendor that Ireland had worked with suggested a plug-in solution called U. are U. from Redwood City, California-based DigitalPersona. One initial DigitalPersona advantage was that authentication could occur merely by having a user place a finger on a reader, Ireland says.</p><p>Ireland decided to order several of the readers so that he could test their performance and user-friendliness in one restaurant. In addition to the readers, the system required that Ireland install DigitalPersona software. He says that simply required that he insert a disk into the restaurant’s back-end server; once running, the program automatically installed drivers into the POS terminals. After rebooting the terminals, Ireland was able to do enrollment, which he says was relatively simple, requiring a few finger swipes of a couple of fingers.</p><p>Ireland says that after conducting a little online research, he was able to find the readers priced for approximately $100 each; the software came free with the readers, he says.</p><p>Quick acceptance. Ireland obtained company approval to purchase the devices and decided to start with an initial rollout of about 40 units total at about 10 of Tar Heel’s approximately 75 restaurants. A slightly larger rollout would follow, with an eventual goal of integrating the units into almost all of Tar Heel’s restaurants.</p><p>Once a store was converted, Ireland knew the old cards would no longer function. His backup plan if he encountered any serious problems with the fingerprint system was that he could convert a restaurant’s authentication system to keypad entry. Ireland says he was confident he could revert to such a method without too much difficulty as the company had used a keypad system a handful of years before it adopted the card authentication method. It would be relatively simple to deactivate the card system to the previous method, he says.</p><p>Ireland began by calling managers to describe the project; most seemed supportive, he says. He then mailed out units to different stores on a rolling basis. He asked managers to set aside about 20 minutes to speak by phone after the readers arrived.</p><p>During calls, he could remotely view the restaurants’ POS terminals. After booting the software, he asked managers to attach the readers and reboot the machines. He then helped them enroll their prints.</p><p>While managers were enrolled remotely, Ireland went on location to stores to help enroll staff. Some employees expressed privacy concerns. He says concerns may have been reduced because the company had recently completed an effort to remove Social Security numbers from restaurant databases. The initiative may have given the company some credibility,</p><p>Ireland says. Staff seemed more concerned about the Social Security numbers than they did about the fingerprint biometric data, he says. Ireland says he tried to have each restaurant keep at least one spare unit securely in the back as a replacement. All terminals generally aren’t used at once, he says; it is also relatively simple to move readers among terminals.</p><p>Since installing units in most of Tar Heel’s Wendy’s, one or two readers have stopped working, but the vendor has sent replacements, Ireland says. In a few cases, some legacy terminals didn’t function with the new product, he says, but those machines were old and are being replaced.</p><p>He encountered few installation-related technological problems. One minor issue occurred in the beginning when readers were attached before the software was running; some machines required a reboot.</p><p>Ireland says he was half-amused when, during installations, the most common question managers asked was “If I’m not around, can I lend someone my card?” But managers quickly adapted, he says. “Most people just thought the technology was cool.”</p><p>Results. Ireland likes the new system and appreciates not having to continually replace cards. 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Console to help security professionals quickly identify incidents, shorten response times, and document events. </p><p>The Boston Globe renewed its use of the In Case of Crisis mobile app from RockDove Solutions.</p><p>SecurityScorecard is collaborating with Columbia University’s Data Science Institute on various data science and machine learning projects to build breach prediction models.</p><p>Securus Technologies expanded the terms of its marketing agreement with Corrisoft, LLC, and can now offer Corrisoft’s smartphone-based offender monitoring solution to its customers.</p><p>TradeMaster announced an integration partnership with reporting and records management software company Emergency Reporting.  </p><p>ZKAccess received Lenel factory certification and has joined the Lenel OpenAccess Alliance Program.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>Hamilton School District in Hamilton, Montana, installed the 3xLOGIC Intelli-M Access browser-based access control management solution at all of the district’s buildings.</p><p>ChemImage Sensor Systems announced that it will design, fabricate, and test sensors designed to detect and locate chemical warfare agents for the U.S. Army.</p><p>Franklin County Public Schools in Virginia will implement the COPsync911 threat-alert system. </p><p>EF Johnson Technologies, Inc., signed a contract with Erie County, Pennsylvania, to upgrade and manage its radio network.</p><p>Uttar Pradesh Police in India selected an integrated suite of public safety software from Hexagon Safety & Infra­structure to enhance call handling, officer dispatching, and agencywide reporting in India’s most populous state. </p><p>McMurdo, Inc., was awarded a contract by the U.S. Coast Guard to supply personal locator beacons to enhance crew safety in the event of emergencies.</p><p>South East Water, based in Melbourne, Australia, upgraded its monitoring systems with a video surveillance platform from Milestone Systems and network cameras from Axis Communications.</p><p>NAPCO Security Technologies, Inc., announced that Paoli Community School System in Indiana selected NAPCO’s ArchiTech Series Locks to be installed in its schools. </p><p>Newtown Public School District in Connecticut implemented a cloud-based school safety system from NaviGate Prepared.</p><p>The Procurement Office of the German Federal Ministry of the Interior signed an agreement with Rohde & Schwarz for 300 R&S QPS200 security scanners to be used everywhere that the German Federal Police Force performs security checks.</p><p>Shelby Township, Michigan, implemented PowerPhone’s Total Response solution for 911 call handling. </p><p>The Safariland Group provided equipment to the New York City Police Department to protect law enforcement personnel from ballistic threats.</p><p>Siklu was selected to provide a wireless connectivity solution for a citywide surveillance system in downtown Fort Myers,  Florida.</p><p>USmax Corporation was awarded General Services Administration Schedule 84 listing to provide services in security systems integration and design services and law enforcement/security training.</p><p>Utility, Inc., announced that the Clayton County Police Department of Georgia will deploy its BodyWorn body cameras, as well as Rocket IoT-X devices for in-car communication. </p><p>The Mato Grosso State Court of Justice in Brazil is conducting a pilot program using a Vision-Box portable solution to improve personal identification processes in criminal hearings. </p><p>Witt O’Brien’s is working with the Texas Department of State Health Services to develop preparedness plans to mitigate risks associated with high-consequence infectious diseases.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>Open Connector video event management software and event-driven intelligence tool from Arteco is a recipient of this year’s Campus Safety magazine BEST Award in the category of video surveillance solutions.</p><p>The Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs named Dallmeier one of Bayerns Best 50 for the third consecutive year.</p><p>Delta Scientific announced that its HD2055 barrier met the criteria of the U.S. Department of State for continuous operations of 1 million cycles. </p><p>Elbit Systems of America, LLC, won the Most Notable Border Security Program Award from Government Security News for the Integrated Fixed Tower deployment to the U.S. Border Patrol. </p><p>Galaxy Control Systems received approval from the American Institute of Architects as a provider of education classes under the organization’s continuing education system.</p><p>GET Group North America received FIPS 201 Certification for its CP500 Identification Card Printer.</p><p>HALTER (Horse and Livestock Team Emergency Response), a Sonoma County, California–based grassroots initiative, is a recipient of the 2016 Federal Emergency Management Administration Individual and Community Preparedness Award in the awareness to action category.</p><p>Medeco Security Locks won a Cam­pus Safety BEST Award. Its Medeco XT Data Analytics was recognized in the access control and identity management category. </p><p>SignalSense was a Gold Winner in the security software—innovations category in the 2016 Golden Bridge Awards. SignalSense was also named the Silver Medalist in the Puget Sound Business Journal list of Washington’s Best Workplaces in the category of businesses with 10 to 49 employees. </p><p>Tyco Security Products announced that its C•CURE 9000 security and event management platform was honored as the Benchmark Innovation Awards 2016 winner in the access control (software) category by Benchmark Magazine in the United Kingdom.</p><p>The newest security keypad and smart card readers from XAC Automation Corporation successfully passed the PCI-PTS 4.1 certification requirements.​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>Canada’s railways released a promotional video about TRANSCAER—the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response initiative—led by the Chemistry Industry Associa­tion of Canada and the Railway Association of Canada to inform communities about the products being transported through their area and provide free training to emergency responders on how to handle a transportation incident involving dangerous goods. </p><p>CoventBridge Group Ltd., the firm created by the merger of GlobalOptions and ICS Merrill, acquired R-ISC Investigation & Surveillance Company Ltd.</p><p>Eagle Eye Networks awarded $1.25 million in Drako Cloud Security Grants to schools throughout the United States, providing a camera system at no cost for one year.</p><p>Flir Systems, Inc., acquired Armasight, Inc., a developer of precision sporting and military optics products.</p><p>Hikvision Canada Inc., launched a new website at www.hikvision.ca.</p><p>IoT solutions company home2net GmbH introduced its new brand name h2n to reflect its increased focus on industrial customers. </p><p>IBM Security announced the formation of IBM X-Force Red, a group of security professionals and ethical hackers whose goal is to help businesses discover vulnerabilities in their computer networks, hardware, and software applications before cybercriminals do. </p><p>Mars Petcare and Whistle are donating Whistle GPS Pet Trackers for all K-9 officers in the Greenwood Police Department, Fort Smith Police Department, and Sebastian County Sherriff’s Department in Arkansas.</p><p>Midwest Alarm Services has acquired Electric Specialties Company of Omaha, Nebraska.</p><p>Nestlé opened the Nestlé Quality Assurance Center in Dublin, Ohio, which is designed to improve the verification of food safety and quality standards and provide support for the implementation and maintenance of food safety programs. </p><p>ONVIF release Profile Q, the specification that features quick and easy discovery, set-up, and configuration of ONVIF-conformant devices.</p><p>Princeton Identity Inc., formerly a line of business of SRI International marketed under the SRI Identity brand, launched operation as an independent company.</p><p>Tyco signed a definitive agreement to sell its security business in South Africa, which operates locally under the ADT brand, to Fidelity Security Group.</p>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465