Healthcare

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Call-for-Help.aspxCall for HelpGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-12-01T05:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/holly-gilbert-stowell.aspx, Holly Gilbert Stowell<p>​With more than 420,000 annual visits from patients from four states, Seattle Children's Hospital serves the largest region of any children's hospital in the United States.</p><p>The organization, made up of a research arm, a foundation, and the hospital, strives to provide robust security while making its stakeholders feel welcome and cared for.  </p><p>"As a security team, our goal is really to ensure the mission of our hospital, which is to treat patients and find cures for diseases," says Dylan Hayes, CPP, manager of the physical security program at Seattle Children's. "We do that by interfacing with our families and our patients…we're a customer-service oriented team." </p><p>A security officer staffs the emergency department around the clock, and officers also operate a security operations center for the entire hospital that is open from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.</p><p>Visitor management is important to Seattle Children's, and the security team screens everyone who walks through the door to ensure that they have a purpose to their visit. Visitor identification is processed by a database that checks for sexual offenses and other criminal records. </p><p>"We have security teams at five different entrances during the day that greet people as they come in, find out where they are going, give them directions, and make sure that they are badged to do so," Hayes says. In addition to the daily pass, family members and loved ones who make frequent patient visits are given weekly passes. </p><p>Seattle Children's trains its employees on active shooter protocols, and has lockdown procedures in place in the event of an emergency. </p><p>"Our entrances are actually equipped to scan a badge that will lock that specific entrance, or a different badge can lock down all the entrances at the hospital," he says. "We're using a lot of security technologies these days to improve our business operations." </p><p>One of those technologies is a call tower intercom model from Vingtor-Stentofon by Zenitel, which allows anyone in distress to contact the hospital's security desk with the push of a button. In addition to contacting the security desk via a speakerphone, a flashing light is activated on the top of the tower. ​</p><p>The hospital uses call tower boxes from Talkaphone and Code Blue, which used to work over a standard telephone line. Zenitel works over an IP network, and integrates with the organization's access control system, OnGuard by Lenel. </p><p>Seattle Children's originally installed the towers in 2012, and it upgraded to a newer model of the intercom technology, called Turbine Intercoms, in May 2017. There are approximately 55 towers located around the hospital grounds, mainly situated in parking lots and other outside public areas. </p><p>"We've upgraded about a third of our phones and we're in the process of upgrading the rest of them," Hayes says, noting that the Turbine model provides a clearer connection from the tower to the emergency operator. "With the older equipment the clarity is not there—you can't make out what's going on," he says. "The Turbine stations really allow for clear communication when you're in critical situations." </p><p>As far as incident types, "anything goes with these towers," Hayes says. When security receives a call, it assesses the situation and decides how to respond, usually either deploying a security officer or contacting law enforcement. Hayes adds that it's rare that police have to get involved. </p><p>"People report their cars have been damaged, or we've had reports of fires in the garage," he says. "There are so many great uses of those towers, it's just open-ended."</p><p>The integration with Lenel allows any cameras in the area to pan, zoom, and tilt toward the call tower's location, allowing security to view the scene live via monitors. Lenel also displays a map in the alarm monitoring screen that shows which tower and where the incident occurred. </p><p>Hayes says he welcomes the opportunity to improve business operations via security technology, and he was delighted when the hospital's emergency department wanted to collaborate with security by responding to any medical incidents from the call towers. </p><p>"If somebody pushes one of those buttons, our plan is to send out a security person with a respiratory therapist and an emergency department nurse if they need medical care," Hayes says. </p><p>Recently, for example, a woman fell down a flight of stairs and was injured. "The emergency call station was activated and a hospital response team, including security, responded," Hayes explains. Security brought a wheelchair and assisted the woman to the emergency room for follow-up care. </p><p>"When our emergency operations team comes to us and says, 'We want to use your technology to better serve our people,' that's a great thing to hear," he notes. "We do have an expectation to provide care because we are a hospital." </p><p>Another benefit of the Vingtor-Stentofon network is the ability to push prerecorded audio messages over the security team's two-way radios, alerting officers to any alarms such as panic buttons or door-forced-open alerts.</p><p> "When we're out in the field, we don't have that ability to do extensive alarm monitoring, and we didn't have a way to quickly get a message to our security team in an automated fashion," he says. "So, we set up Stentofon to be configured with our Motorola MOTOTRBO radio system." </p><p>Because alarm locations are preset in Lenel, the prerecorded message that goes out indicates the type of alert and where it occurred. The responding officer alerts the rest of the team that the situation is being handled. </p><p>"We could have alerts go to a pager, but then there's a two-minute delay," he says. "If we have it go to the radio, then it's instantaneous." </p><p>Hayes adds that the many uses of the call towers, along with the radio and alarm integration, have all helped improve the security team's ability to respond to incidents rapidly and effectively.</p><p>"Having that crystal-clear communication is so important to be able to deploy the right emergency response team," he says.</p><p> For more information: Kelly Lake, EndingBadAudio@Zenitel.com, https://www.zenitel.com, 800.654.3140</p>

Healthcare

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Call-for-Help.aspx2017-12-01T05:00:00ZCall for Help
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Securing-Service--How-Security-Is-Helping-The-Children-Of-Camden-County.aspx2017-11-09T05:00:00ZSecuring Service: How Security Is Helping Camden County’s Children
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Dirty-Secret-of-Drug-Diversion.aspx2017-08-01T04:00:00ZThe Dirty Secret of Drug Diversion
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Senior-Safety.aspx2017-07-01T04:00:00ZSenior Safety
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Responding-to-Violence-in-Healthcare.aspx2017-06-26T04:00:00ZResponding to Violence in Healthcare
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-April-2017.aspx2017-04-01T04:00:00ZIndustry News April 2017
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Supply-Chain-Strategies.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZSupply Chain Strategies
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Radioactive-Remedies.aspx2017-02-01T05:00:00ZRadioactive Remedies
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Top-Ten-Challenges-for-ED-Security.aspx2016-12-01T05:00:00ZThe Top Ten Challenges for ED Security in 2016 and Beyond
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Healthcare.aspx2016-11-23T05:00:00ZInfographic: Guns & Healthcare
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Speedy-Surveillance.aspx2016-11-01T04:00:00ZSpeedy Surveillance
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Patient-Zero.aspx2016-07-01T04:00:00ZPatient Zero
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Hide-Hide-Hide.aspx2016-07-01T04:00:00ZHide. Hide. Hide.
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Hospital-and-Healthcare-Security.aspx2016-03-11T05:00:00ZBook Review: Hospital and Healthcare Security, Sixth Edition
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/BCHS-Protects-Patient-Data.aspx2016-02-12T05:00:00ZBCHS Protects Patient Data
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/On-the-Record.aspx2016-01-14T05:00:00ZOn the Record
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-December-2015.aspx2015-12-01T05:00:00ZIndustry News December 2015
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Inoculating-Against-Violence.aspx2015-11-30T05:00:00ZInoculating Against Violence
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Culture-of-Caring.aspx2015-09-01T04:00:00ZCulture of Caring
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Fuga-de-Información-Médica.aspx2015-06-10T04:00:00ZFuga de Información Médica

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Responding-to-Violence-in-Healthcare.aspxResponding to Violence in Healthcare<p>​</p><p>Violence in healthcare settings—especially in hospital emergency departments—is on the rise. A well-trained security team working in concert with the medical team can help manage this increasing violence.</p><p><strong>The problem.</strong> In February 2017, The Joint Commission, a healthcare accreditation organization, reported, "Anyone in a health care facility can become a victim of violence. Since January 2010, The Joint Commission has received 201 reports from its accredited organizations of violent criminal events. Excluding the 16 reports of shootings…the database includes 118 reports of rape, 32 reports of homicide, 28 reports of physical assault, and seven reports of sexual assault." More than half of the incidents were patient-on-patient violence; six of the physical assaults were patient-on-staff violence.​ </p><p>While healthcare workers make up less than 10 percent of the U.S. workforce, there are nearly as many violent injuries in the healthcare industry as in all other industries combined, Alexia Fernández Campbell reported in a December 2016 article in <em>The Atlantic.</em> She also cited a 2015 study, where 76 percent of nurses at a private hospital system in Virginia said they had experienced physical or verbal abuse from patients in the previous year. </p><p>According to The Joint Commission, "A recent Occupational Safety and Health Administration report on workplace violence in healthcare highlights the magnitude of the problem: while 21 percent of registered nurses and nursing students reported being physically assaulted, more than 50 percent were verbally abused…in a 12-month period. In addition, 12 percent of emergency nurses experienced physical violence, and 59 percent experienced verbal abuse during a seven-day period." </p><p>The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health adopted standards requiring hospitals to establish workplace violence prevention plans to protect healthcare workers and other facility personnel from aggressive and violent behavior. To identify risks, to report them, and to annually evaluate them are normal safety requirements in at least 16 U.S. states. </p><p>Joint Commission standard EM.02.02.05, EP 3 calls for hospitals to clearly explain how personnel are to respond to violence in their management plans. Specifically, "The Emergency Operations Plan describes how the hospital will coordinate security activities with community security agencies." Hospitals are to include preparation for emergencies such as an active shooter situation. </p><p><strong>Training.</strong> When the incident rate of aggression is high, the security team can be trained to use advanced confrontation techniques which enable them to manage the most aggressive patients. Of course, security officers work under the supervision of medical staff, and they should use only defensive techniques to control patients. </p><p>Training for de-escalation and other responses to aggressive behavior is provided by such companies as Crisis Prevention Institute, MOAB Training International, and AVADE. It is important for the trainer to address the healthcare facility's security management plan during the sessions. </p><p>Security officers can learn verbal judo and simple defensive techniques in as little as four hours; however, those working in high-incident areas will benefit from longer training sessions. Costs usually include a student workbook, the trainer's fee, and the student's wage. </p><p>At one facility where more than 20 patient watches occur each day, the staff is subject to potential violence. The immediate availability of highly trained security specialists helps to keep the area as safe as possible. The security team finds weapons, places aggressive patients into restraints (on medical authority), and occasionally assists police with responses to violence in the hospital. </p><p>The training of the security specialists at that facility focuses on use of the AVADE (Awareness Vigilance Avoidance Defense Escape/ Environment) defensive techniques. This training shows how a 120-pound person can quickly take down an attacker weighing more than 250 pounds. Size of the security officer is not as important as the quality of the training. </p><p>Proper training can not only improve the security response but also help prevent injuries to security, staff, and patients. When medical staff observe a demonstration of a physical response by a well-trained security officer, confidence in the whole security team is enhanced. </p><p>Securitas has five area trainers who provide de-escalation training and emergency department response team training at a large healthcare system. In class, the trainers address the safety issues of the environment, position of staff, responses to aggressive behavior, and restraints. After such training, the medical staff and the security staff work much more efficiently together. Additionally, the trainers provide security awareness training for all staff for normal security issues such as identity theft, safety in parking lots, and other personal safety issues. </p><p><strong>Response.</strong> Techniques for responses to aggression usually address early identification of violence or escalation of violence so that efforts to de-escalate could prevent a crisis, such as an assault. Security teams working in the emergency department are in position to identify the escalation of unacceptable behavior. When intervention is needed, the security team and medical personnel should work together as a response team. </p><p>Typical incidents to which security may respond are: a person with a severe behavioral health disorder who becomes combative; a dementia patient who walks away from healthcare, is lost, and does not communicate coherently; and a drug seeker who threatens medical staff when specific drugs are not prescribed. All of these examples may result in injury to the medical staff if physical intervention does not occur promptly. Security officers may attempt to de-escalate and control the patient so that the medical staff are safe to continue their work. </p><p>In one situation, police responded to de-escalate a behavioral health patient. When the situation appeared to be safe, the officer left the facility. While walking out of the building, the patient attacked the officer and removed his weapon. The security supervisor quickly took hold of the patient and removed the weapon from the patient. With the help of other security officers, the supervisor controlled that person until the police arrived, and arrested the assailant. This is just one of many examples in which the security staff, using physical skills authorized by post orders, successfully responded to an incident. </p><p>Fortunately, in most incidents where the security team responds to assist medical staff, the situations are resolved satisfactorily through verbal persuasion, and the aggressive person is escorted away. Security will conduct an investigation, record the details of the incident, and make notifications as required by policy. In those rare situations that demand a police  response, the security team manages the situation and provides police information. </p><p>One key for success is that the security team understands the medical protocols and that the medical team understands the security protocols. In other words, they must work as a team to keep the environment safe. In a monthlong study at one hospital, there were 59 CODE Gray calls—requests for security response to an aggressive person. In 30 of those instances, physical restraints were applied on request of medical staff. </p><p>Early reporting of an escalating situation and early involvement of the security team is critical for reducing risks. The security team can manage the aggressive persons, de-escalate them if needed, and move them either back to medical care or away from the conflict area if the medical team has completed any treatment. The security response helps to reduce risks to medical staff, helps to keep them safe, and saves them time from working with potentially aggressive persons. And finally, the security team reports back to the medical team after situations are resolved. </p><p>Teamwork and proper training help a security team to manage critical incidents of aggressive behavior that occur almost daily in healthcare. </p><p><em>Lee Cloney, CPP, is region director of training and development for Securitas Security Services USA. He is a Certified Healthcare Protection Administrator (CHPA) and serves on the ASIS Foundation Board of Trustees.​</em></p>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Call-for-Help.aspxCall for Help<p>​With more than 420,000 annual visits from patients from four states, Seattle Children's Hospital serves the largest region of any children's hospital in the United States.</p><p>The organization, made up of a research arm, a foundation, and the hospital, strives to provide robust security while making its stakeholders feel welcome and cared for.  </p><p>"As a security team, our goal is really to ensure the mission of our hospital, which is to treat patients and find cures for diseases," says Dylan Hayes, CPP, manager of the physical security program at Seattle Children's. "We do that by interfacing with our families and our patients…we're a customer-service oriented team." </p><p>A security officer staffs the emergency department around the clock, and officers also operate a security operations center for the entire hospital that is open from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.</p><p>Visitor management is important to Seattle Children's, and the security team screens everyone who walks through the door to ensure that they have a purpose to their visit. Visitor identification is processed by a database that checks for sexual offenses and other criminal records. </p><p>"We have security teams at five different entrances during the day that greet people as they come in, find out where they are going, give them directions, and make sure that they are badged to do so," Hayes says. In addition to the daily pass, family members and loved ones who make frequent patient visits are given weekly passes. </p><p>Seattle Children's trains its employees on active shooter protocols, and has lockdown procedures in place in the event of an emergency. </p><p>"Our entrances are actually equipped to scan a badge that will lock that specific entrance, or a different badge can lock down all the entrances at the hospital," he says. "We're using a lot of security technologies these days to improve our business operations." </p><p>One of those technologies is a call tower intercom model from Vingtor-Stentofon by Zenitel, which allows anyone in distress to contact the hospital's security desk with the push of a button. In addition to contacting the security desk via a speakerphone, a flashing light is activated on the top of the tower. ​</p><p>The hospital uses call tower boxes from Talkaphone and Code Blue, which used to work over a standard telephone line. Zenitel works over an IP network, and integrates with the organization's access control system, OnGuard by Lenel. </p><p>Seattle Children's originally installed the towers in 2012, and it upgraded to a newer model of the intercom technology, called Turbine Intercoms, in May 2017. There are approximately 55 towers located around the hospital grounds, mainly situated in parking lots and other outside public areas. </p><p>"We've upgraded about a third of our phones and we're in the process of upgrading the rest of them," Hayes says, noting that the Turbine model provides a clearer connection from the tower to the emergency operator. "With the older equipment the clarity is not there—you can't make out what's going on," he says. "The Turbine stations really allow for clear communication when you're in critical situations." </p><p>As far as incident types, "anything goes with these towers," Hayes says. When security receives a call, it assesses the situation and decides how to respond, usually either deploying a security officer or contacting law enforcement. Hayes adds that it's rare that police have to get involved. </p><p>"People report their cars have been damaged, or we've had reports of fires in the garage," he says. "There are so many great uses of those towers, it's just open-ended."</p><p>The integration with Lenel allows any cameras in the area to pan, zoom, and tilt toward the call tower's location, allowing security to view the scene live via monitors. Lenel also displays a map in the alarm monitoring screen that shows which tower and where the incident occurred. </p><p>Hayes says he welcomes the opportunity to improve business operations via security technology, and he was delighted when the hospital's emergency department wanted to collaborate with security by responding to any medical incidents from the call towers. </p><p>"If somebody pushes one of those buttons, our plan is to send out a security person with a respiratory therapist and an emergency department nurse if they need medical care," Hayes says. </p><p>Recently, for example, a woman fell down a flight of stairs and was injured. "The emergency call station was activated and a hospital response team, including security, responded," Hayes explains. Security brought a wheelchair and assisted the woman to the emergency room for follow-up care. </p><p>"When our emergency operations team comes to us and says, 'We want to use your technology to better serve our people,' that's a great thing to hear," he notes. "We do have an expectation to provide care because we are a hospital." </p><p>Another benefit of the Vingtor-Stentofon network is the ability to push prerecorded audio messages over the security team's two-way radios, alerting officers to any alarms such as panic buttons or door-forced-open alerts.</p><p> "When we're out in the field, we don't have that ability to do extensive alarm monitoring, and we didn't have a way to quickly get a message to our security team in an automated fashion," he says. "So, we set up Stentofon to be configured with our Motorola MOTOTRBO radio system." </p><p>Because alarm locations are preset in Lenel, the prerecorded message that goes out indicates the type of alert and where it occurred. The responding officer alerts the rest of the team that the situation is being handled. </p><p>"We could have alerts go to a pager, but then there's a two-minute delay," he says. "If we have it go to the radio, then it's instantaneous." </p><p>Hayes adds that the many uses of the call towers, along with the radio and alarm integration, have all helped improve the security team's ability to respond to incidents rapidly and effectively.</p><p>"Having that crystal-clear communication is so important to be able to deploy the right emergency response team," he says.</p><p> For more information: Kelly Lake, EndingBadAudio@Zenitel.com, https://www.zenitel.com, 800.654.3140</p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Hospital-and-Healthcare-Security.aspxBook Review: Hospital and Healthcare Security, Sixth Edition<p>Earlier editions of <i>Hospital and Healthcare Security</i> have long been a staple in the library of hospital security professionals, and this sixth edition will be no exception. Practitioners who are looking for proven solutions to old or new security problems should start with this reference.  </p><p>The authors continue to focus on the issues that are at the core of the healthcare market, and they have stayed abreast of the changes in the industry and the required changes in facility security programs. New developments such as the use of body cameras for security officers and trends in arming security personnel are addressed in this updated edition.  </p><p>Best practices from throughout North America and the United Kingdom are highlighted in this book. The authors have done a wonderful job with the presentation of security program management and program delivery, identifying best practices and areas of concern and providing real-world examples, procedures, and policies. They have addressed staffing, operations, tools, and equipment.</p><p>The authors have even touched on the needs of healthcare facilities beyond the traditional hospital setting and in off-campus facilities. They have addressed security design philosophies and practices as well as systems and equipment and how they are best employed at a healthcare facility.  </p><p>The material is well organized and written and will be an invaluable resource to hospital and healthcare security professionals, to consultants, and even to facility administrators.  </p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Michael Preece</strong>, PE (Professional Engineer), PSP, CxA (Certified Commissioning Authority), is a principal with Smith Seckman Reid and runs the company’s Washington, D.C. office. Preece has been providing planning, design, start-up, consultation, and commissioning services for security systems over the last 15 years, much of it concentrated on hospitals and healthcare facilities. He is a member of the ASIS International Healthcare Security Council. </em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465