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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/July-2017-Industry-News.aspxJuly 2017 Industry NewsGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-07-01T04:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/flora-szatkowski.aspx, Flora Szatkowski<h4>​Video Update for the Council</h4><p>The Council of Europe is an international organization that was created to promote democracy and protect human rights and the rule of law in Europe. Located in Strasbourg, France, the organization focuses on issues such as child protection, online hate speech, minority rights, corruption, and judicial reform.</p><p>The headquarters campus has five distinctive buildings, including the Agora (pictured here). The video surveillance systems throughout the campus needed updating, and security managers called on Securitas and ENGIE Ineo to design and implement a new system. ENGIE Ineo partnered with Milestone Systems for video management software and Axis for network cameras. The team replaced the analog system with a full network video surveillance solution that delivers better performance, ease of access to video assets, and flexibility in tailoring how different locations are secured. The work was done with a minimum of disruption and completed early in 2017.​</p><h4>PARTNERSHIPS AND DEALS</h4><p>Hyatt Guns of Charlotte, North Carolina, deployed 3xLOGIC thermal cameras to increase security for the store. Sonitrol Carolinas installed the cameras and now oversees the video monitoring.</p><p>AMAG Technology and CodeLynx integrated AMAG’s Symmetry Access Control software and CodeLynx’s ARIES Mixed Reality platform.</p><p>Amika Mobile announced that the Amika Mobility Server platform for critical communications is now integrated with the Guardian Indoor Active Shooter Detection System from Shooter Detection Systems.</p><p>Point Blank Enterprises will distribute ARMORVENT systems to the U.S. commercial and law enforcement markets.</p><p>ASSA ABLOY announced the integration of its Aperio wireless lock technology with ProdataKey’s pdk io cloud managed access control solution. </p><p>V5 Systems is partnering with Axis Communications to create a self-powered solution to protect people outdoors.</p><p>Bosch Security Systems and Sony Corporation are partnering in sales, marketing, and technical collaboration for video security solutions.</p><p>Brivo and Mercury Security integrated the Authentic Mercury open platform into Brivo’s flagship OnAir access control system.</p><p>CBC AMERICAS Corp. announced a strategic business alliance with CrucialTrak to introduce CrucialTrak’s range of products to Japan, Australia, North America, and Latin America.</p><p>Centerra Group, LLC, was selected as the protective services contractor at URENCO USA’s site in New Mexico. </p><p>Checkpoint Systems is implementing electronic article surveillance systems at approximately 2,800 Dollar General retail locations. </p><p>Delta Scientific provided temporary vehicle barriers to restrict vehicle access to Bourbon Street in New Orleans during Mardi Gras.</p><p>Flexera Software is working with the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center to offer verified software vulnerability intelligence alerts to critical sector entities worldwide.</p><p>Genetec integrated gunshot detection technology from ShotSpotter in its Security Center.</p><p>Huawei is collaborating with Honeywell to create smart building offerings and make them sustainable, secure, and energy efficient.</p><p>HySecurity commercial, industrial, and antiterrorist automated gate systems are now available to PSA Security Network integrators.</p><p>Ergos Group and IndigoVision worked together to improve surveillance at the stadium of the Santos </p><p>Futebol Clube in Santos, Brazil.</p><p>Netsurion was named a Fortinet MSSP Platinum Partner.</p><p>Free2Move, a mobility app for car-sharing providers, including companies such as Car2Go, Flinkster, Multicity, Zipcar, and DriveNow, selected Jumio Netverify Trusted Identity as a service to verify customers’ driver’s licenses.</p><p>Kentec gas extinguishing fire safety panels are helping protect Specsavers’ new West Midland manufacturing and distribution center. The new fire safety system was designed and installed by Leader Systems LLP. </p><p>Lenel and Everbridge, Inc., announced an alliance to interface their leading solutions for comprehensive security management and critical communications.</p><p>March Networks announced a strategic partnership with Oncam for its banking, retail, and transportation solutions.</p><p>Mount Airey Group, Inc., is partnering with Acuant to launch a comprehensive authentication solution for border control and to minimize the acceptance of fraudulent passports.</p><p>Henry County Hospital in Ohio is using the Netwrix Auditor from Netwrix Corporation.</p><p>A collaboration between nuPSYS and Bosch Video Management System integrates the nuPSYS 3D-mapping solution to allow assets, sensors, alarms, and critical points to be plotted onto a 3D mapping surface.</p><p>Park Assist was awarded the Parking Guidance System contract for the University of Texas at Dallas in its new garage.</p><p>Deutsche Telekom entered a strategic partnership with Radiflow to collaborate in securing industrial networks. </p><p>Raytec LED lighting improved security at a multisite installation for the National Bank of Romania. </p><p>SALTO Systems hired Warren Associates to sell SALTO’s security products in northern California, northern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Idaho. Bassett Sales Corporation will represent SALTO in the Southwest United States and Hawaii.</p><p>Semafone is partnering with Australian compliance specialist SecureCo to protect customer payment data.</p><p>Sharp Robotics Business Development appointed U.S. Security Associates as an authorized guard services reseller of the Sharp INTELLOS Automated Unmanned Ground Vehicle.</p><p>Suprema announced that its SFU-S20 fingerprint modules are integrated in BioWolf LE rugged tablet PCs from BioRugged.</p><p>London development New Ludgate chose Tyco Security Products C·CURE 9000 Security and Event Management system to unite building management, access control, and video surveillance systems.</p><p>Vanderbilt integrated its award-winning Lite Blue and Bright Blue access control solutions with Allegion’s Schlage NDE series wireless locks with Engage technology.</p><p>An official partnership agreement was signed by SMR Links Consultants and VSTEP, making SMR Links the exclusive partner of the NAUTIS maritime simulators and RescueSim Incident Command Simulator in the United Arab Emirates region.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>American Public University was selected by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration Institute of Higher Education to provide academic programs to up to 20,000 TSA employees at 147 airports nationwide.</p><p>Fredericton Police Force in Canada is testing Axon body cameras.</p><p>The U.S. Department of Commerce and First Responder Network Authority selected AT&T to build the first nationwide wireless broadband network dedicated to America’s first responders. </p><p>BioTrackTHC partnered with the Hawaii Department of Health to deploy a live seed-to-sale cannabis traceability system in a FedRAMP authorized environment. </p><p>Bittium received a purchase order from the Finnish Defence Forces for Bittium Tactical Wireless IP Network system products.</p><p>Edesix is the body-worn camera provider of choice for Her Majesty’s Prison Service throughout the United Kingdom.</p><p>Central Lake Armor Express, Inc., was awarded a new contract with the San Francisco Police Department and San Francisco Sheriff’s Department to provide its Vortex ballistic vest.</p><p>Police in the Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland, where the World Economic Forum was held, employed a drone defense system from Dedrone to monitor critical airspace above the area.</p><p>Boise Airport updated its security infrastructure with Genetec Security Center to manage cameras, access control points, and video analytics software.</p><p>The City of Deagu, South Korea, is using Hikvision cameras in an integrated atmospheric information system.</p><p>J & S Franklin Ltd. delivered DefenCell MAC geotextile lined metal gabions to the Tunisian authorities for deployment on the Tunisian-Libyan border.</p><p>Milestone Systems open platform IP video management software was installed at JFK International Airport. </p><p>Mutualink and Rave Mobile Safety announced a technology deployment in Warwick, Rhode Island, public schools as an effort to help save lives through enhanced collaboration with the local police, fire departments, and hospitals. </p><p>Colquitt County Jail in Georgia worked with local systems integrator Ace Technologies to deploy a new video system from Pelco by Schneider Electric. </p><p>Safran Identity and Security supplied a facial recognition solution to the National Police of The Netherlands.</p><p>SRC was awarded a U.S. Army contract to deliver, integrate, and sustain 15 counter-UAS systems. </p><p>SuperCom announced that its M2M division was selected by the Czech Republic Ministry of Justice to deploy its PureSecurity Electronic Monitoring Suite.</p><p>Total Recall Corporation will work with the City of Chattanooga and the Chattanooga Police Department to provide a citywide safety solution that includes CrimeEye-RD-2 rapid deployment portable video systems.</p><p>Vialseg combined forces with Vivotek’s local distributor Selnet and LPR software partner Neural Labs to provide red light enforcement systems for Argentinian cities.</p><p>Zenitel is providing IP-based security systems for Oslo Schools.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>ByteGrid achieved the SOC2+ HITRUST designation, to go along with its EHNAC accreditation.</p><p>The office of the Ohio Secretary of State certified that Verity voting from Hart InterCivic meets all state requirements to ensure fair and accurate elections.</p><p>IBM announced that its scientists have been granted a patent around a machine learning system that can dynamically shift control of an autonomous vehicle between a human driver and a vehicle control processor in the event of a potential emergency.</p><p>Intelligent Protection International Limited was granted Conseil National des Activités Privées de Sécurité status and is licensed for Close Protection activities in France. </p><p>Frost & Sullivan recognized Karamba Security with the 2017 North American New Product Innovation Award for the Automotive Industry.</p><p>Milestone Systems was named one of the 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon by Oregon Business Magazine.</p><p>PinPoint Initiative from PinPoint won a Platinum Govie award from Security Today in the category of User Authentication/Identification/Credentialing and Management.</p><p>Secure I.T. Environments Ltd. achieved new quality management standards for design, construction, and management of data centers. The new accreditations are SOHSAS 18001:2007 (ISO 45001), ISO 14001:2015, and BN ES ISO 9001:2015.</p><p>Sielox LLC recognized MCM Integrated Systems of Van Nuys, California, as its National Business Partner of the Year.</p><p>Snap Surveillance achieved the status of Milestone Certified Solution with its integration to XProtect Corporate IP video management software. </p><p>Sword & Shield Enterprise Security was named to the Cybersecurity 500, a global compilation of leading cybersecurity solutions and service companies.</p><p>Tosibox won the Industrial and Security Category Awards at the IOT/M2M Innovation World Cup.</p><p>Tyco Security Products announced that its Innometriks Cheetah high assurance physical access reader achieved UL 294 certification, and the complete Innometriks Infinitas FICAM solution is now listed on the U.S. General Services Administration Approved Product List.</p><p>Vinson Guard Service, Inc., and company president Christine Vinson were honored with the James J. Coleman, Sr., Corporate Partner Award at the Annual Crimestoppers of Greater New Orleans Awards Luncheon. </p><p>Virtual StrongBox, Inc., was named a finalist for a Blue Diamond Award, which recognizes the best technology in the greater Charlotte area.​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>ASSA ABLOY completed an additional seven Environmental Product Declarations, third-party reports that document the ways in which a product affects the environment.</p><p>Blancco Technology Group opened a new office in Beijing, China. </p><p>The Community Security Service is launching a new app, the Jewish Security Application, allowing individuals to report suspicious activity and document anti-Semitic incidents quickly and accurately from their smartphones.</p><p>Constellis entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Centerra Group, LLC, and its subsidiaries.</p><p>DNA Labs International relocated to a larger laboratory near its current facility in Deerfield Beach, Florida.</p><p>A new shipping facility for eDist Security in Dallas offers more space.</p><p>Intelligent Protection International Limited opened an office in Paris on the Champs-Elysées.</p><p>MorphoTrak will donate access to MorphoCloud to West Virginia University. The donation will support research and education in biometrics and forensics.</p><p>The National Association of Police Equipment Distributors is welcoming online distributors and retailers within the law enforcement, public safety, and military markets to its general membership.</p><p>NEC Corporation and Infosec Corporation established Infosec America, Inc., as a security operations center in Santa Clara, California.</p><p>Pelco by Schneider Electric launched a new informational website for the security industry: securityinsights.pelco.com.</p><p>Red Hawk Fire & Security acquired  two companies: Alarm Tech Solutions of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area and Integrated Systems of Florida.</p><p>RiskIQ revealed that its intelligence and external threat investigation system was used by the Citizen Lab in the discovery of commercial spyware that targeted the mobile phone data of United Arab Emirates human rights activists.</p><p>The Security Industry Association established the SIA International Relations Committee to engage with international trade officials, to facilitate education for SIA members on topics related to trade/export programs, and to collaborate with global security trade associations.</p><p>SecurityScorecard launched the Risk Ratings Alliance Program aimed at developing strategic partnerships to help the world’s companies become more secure through collaboration and trust. </p><p>Security Innovation’s security division, OnBoard Security, is placing all of its NTRUEncrypt patents in the public domain, so that they may be freely used under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal License.</p><p>The Smart Card Alliance is changing its name to the Secure Technology Alliance.</p><p>Tyco Security Products launched a new partner portal to enhance the third-party integration process with its brands.</p><p>Unisys Corporation plans to launch the Unisys Artificial Intelligence Center of Excellence, allowing users to gain free access to online tools to help them develop capabilities in advanced data analytics.</p><p>ViSTA Networking Solutions announced that its network video recorder configuration tool is now available for download. ​</p>

Government

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/July-2017-Industry-News.aspx2017-07-01T04:00:00ZJuly 2017 Industry News
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Next-Tase-Phase.aspx2016-10-01T04:00:00ZThe Next Tase Phase
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Vote-for-Biometrics.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZA Vote for Biometrics
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/In-the-Public-Interest.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZIn the Public Interest
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Head-Start-on-Insider-Threats.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZA Head Start on Insider Threats
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Lessons-of-Flint.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZThe Lessons of Flint
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-October-2015.aspx2015-10-19T04:00:00ZIndustry News October 2015
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Andreas-Poppius.aspx2015-10-14T04:00:00ZFrom Military Heroes to Security Assets
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Washington-Navy-Yard-On-Lockdown-After-Reports-of-Shooter.aspx2015-07-02T04:00:00ZWashington Navy Yard On Lockdown After Reports of Shooter
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/China-Tries-to-Cage-Corruption.aspx2015-04-01T04:00:00ZChina Tries to Cage Corruption
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/lax-lab-safety.aspx2014-11-01T04:00:00ZLax Lab Safety
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/a-new-point-view-0013505.aspx2014-07-01T04:00:00ZA New Point of View
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/crime-lab-manual-0013520.aspx2014-07-01T04:00:00ZCrime Lab Manual
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/united-states-charges-china-first-criminal-cyber-espionage-case-0013423.aspx2014-05-19T04:00:00ZUnited States Charges China in First Criminal Cyber Espionage Case
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/infrastructure-protection-0013189.aspx2014-03-01T05:00:00ZUpdated National Infrastructure Protection Plan Released
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/security-clearances-0013186.aspx2014-03-01T05:00:00ZWhen Are Security Clearances Necessary?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/who-really-needs-a-security-clearance-0013192.aspx2014-02-26T05:00:00ZWho Really Needs A Security Clearance?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/canine-evidence-0013125.aspx2014-02-01T05:00:00ZCanine Evidence
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/data-breaches-0013123.aspx2014-02-01T05:00:00ZReport: Federal Responses to Data Breaches
https://sm.asisonline.org/national-security/border-security2014-01-31T05:00:00ZBorder security.

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Drafting-a-Blueprint-for-Security.aspxDrafting a Blueprint for Security<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">Immediately upon concluding the construction of a secure-asset facility 10 years ago, project management hit a major setback: the security manager. Instead of working with the design team and project manager in the initial phases of the project, the security manager waited until the new facility was already erected to determine where security cameras needed to be placed.</span></p><p>“All of a sudden, we’re moving cameras and changing openings and sleeves in the wall for wiring because [the security manager] had difficulty reading blueprints,” says Rick Lavelle, PSP, principal architect and owner of Creador Architecture, of the experience. Instead of admitting that he had this difficulty, the security manager waited until he could see the facility three-dimensionally, causing delays and increasing project costs.</p><p>“Then he’d step in and really do his job that would have been helpful to have earlier in the process,” Lavelle explains.</p><p>To help prevent security professionals from becoming similar setbacks in construction projects, Security Management sat down with Lavelle; Mark Schreiber, CPP, principal consultant for Safeguards Consulting and chair of the ASIS International Security Architecture and Engineering Council; Rene Rieder, Jr., CPP, PSP, associate principal at Ove Arup & Partners; and J. Kelly Stewart, managing director and CEO of Newcastle Consulting, for their tips on navigating the document and project management process.​</p><h4>1. Know Your Team</h4><p>Like almost any project that involves numerous people, it’s crucial to understand that a construction project is a team effort that requires team members to understand the process and communicate with each other.</p><p>“We emphasize...know who your team is, align with your team, and communicate with your team as much as possible because that will support a central project,” Schreiber explains. </p><p>And this team can be quite large, including top executives at the company, the project manager, the facility operations manager, the facility engineer, the security manager, security consultants, architects and designers, engineers, and general consultants—just to name a few. The council encourages team members to construct a simple diagram to help keep track of everyone.</p><p>While it may take a while, identifying the team and communicating with them helps ensure that security is included in construction project discussions from the very beginning—something that doesn’t always happen automatically. </p><p>“I was fairly surprised to learn early on in one of [the first classes I taught] that most of the project is completed—and sometimes is built—when the security manager gets a roll of drawings and they say, ‘Give us a security plan,’” Lavelle says.  </p><p>To change this, he explains that security needs to “know the relationships within their own companies that they need to develop so that doesn’t happen to them, [and that they make sure] they’re brought in earlier in the process. That leads to a much more successful implementation of anybody’s security plan.”</p><p>Lavelle also recommends that security leads work with the IT department during the project. “Getting IT, security, and the facilities people together on one team and having them all have the same direction, you’ll probably have the most effective security program that’s possible,” he explains.​</p><h4>2. Know Your Goals</h4><p>A construction project is rarely initiated just to meet a security need. It’s typically instigated to meet some other operational need, such as to increase manufacturing capacity. So the security department must ensure that its goals for the project—whether it’s introducing a new CCTV system or implementing its existing access control system—align with the overarching goals for the new facility.</p><p>“Just because they now have been given the green light to do an improvement for their facility doesn’t mean that they can go in and put every possible technology, every possible countermeasure that they’ve been dreaming about for years in,” Schreiber says. “They have to work within the goals of that project.”</p><p>This means that once the goals for the facility are outlined, the security department needs to specify its own project goals, providing a way to measure those goals, ensuring that goals are attainable and relevant to the overall project, identifying the starting functional requirements, and making sure they meet time and budgetary constraints. In the case of a new manufacturing plant, for example, CCTV might be attractive to other departments as well, such as quality management or logistics, creating a stronger case for the technology and getting these departments to share the expense.</p><p>By going through this process, security professionals can make sure that their goals are aligned with the overall project goals, enabling them to have success, Schreiber adds. “Whereas the more they stray away, they’re going to essentially be spinning their wheels, wasting effort, and possibly jeopardizing credibility.”​</p><h4>3. Know Your Documents</h4><p>For most security professionals, being part of a construction project is not routine. Nor is the process of reading project manuals, floor plans, elevations, and other drawing plans. But understanding what these documents are and how they come together to represent a construction project is key to the success of the project “because if the documents are correct, then you have a sound project for development,” Stewart says.</p><p>That’s because the documents work together as a guide detailing the design of the project, the technology that will be installed, and where exactly those installations will take place in the final construction. </p><p>And while discussing changes or where technology should be installed in the final project, security directors can communicate with design professionals and architects—regardless of their drawing skills, Lavelle adds. A quick visual representation of the camera and access control location can be helpful. </p><p>While these discussions are taking place, it’s important to document changes throughout the process and review them with the project team after each step is completed. “It’s arduous, but it’s a necessary evil because if you skip a step, you’ll forget something or something will fall through the cracks,” Stewart explains.</p><p>After the construction project is completed, it’s important to continue to keep track of its documentation and make sure it’s up to date so it reflects the current facility. In one case, Stewart took over as a director of security for a company that hadn’t documented the many changes to its system over the years. </p><p>“I actually had to bring in a security consultant and architect to figure out where all the stuff was,” he says. “There were drawings that were going back 20 years, which had nothing to do with the current system.”​</p><h4>4. Know Your Chain of Command</h4><p>In an ideal world, once the initial security goals for the project are outlined and plans are designed to implement them, nothing would change. “But truthfully, it never works that way,” Lavelle says. And when changes or problems occur, it’s critical to know who in the project team you need to talk to about implementing a solution. </p><p>As the project goes further along, you spend less time with the design team and more time with the general contractor, Lavelle explains. This means that security directors need to understand the roles and responsibilities of those involved in the project, and who they need to speak to about changes throughout the process.</p><p>For instance, some construction projects can take more than 18 months to complete, and during that time technology may change or new company policies may be implemented. The security needs for the project may shift, but it might not be appropriate to seek executive approval for the change.</p><p>“Going back to the CEO or the CFO who approved the project costs in the beginning may not be appropriate if you’re halfway through construction,” Lavelle says. Instead, security directors will likely need to go to the facility or project manager, or even their direct supervisor, to have the changes approved.</p><p>Most security professionals have never been involved in a construction project. For them, this is a “once in their career” experience, Rieder says. Following the steps outlined above can help smooth the way. However, if a project seems overwhelming security professionals need to reach out to peers or experts for help and advice.</p><p><em>​The Security Architecture and Engineering Council is sponsoring an educational session on the <a href="https://www.asisonline.org/Education-Events/Education-Programs/Classroom/Pages/Security-Document-and-Project-Management-Process.aspx" target="_blank">security document and project management process​</a> in October.</em><br></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/December-2016-Industry-White-Papers.aspxDecember 2016 Industry White Papers<p><em>​Sponsored Content.</em></p><p>SIS international is committed to serving the information needs of the global community of security </p><p>practitioners. One means of delivering subject matter expertise is to partner with the manufacturer and supplier community to elicit a breadth and depth of insight and practical information that all too often goes untapped. The papers in the following pages reflect one aspect of that ongoing project. </p><p>According to a recent Security Management survey, fully 90 percent of ASIS members describe vendors as reliable contributors to the ongoing conversation in the industry, and many say they have gleaned valuable insights and information from vendor materials that they are not getting from other media sources.</p><p>The challenge, say security practitioners, is the low signal-to-noise ratio in vendor communications. Some say that vendors communicate only information that contributes to their sales. Others suggest that vendor communications historically have been narrowly tailored to their specific products and services. </p><p>To leverage this industry source for members while simultaneously addressing the concerns they describe, Security Management is partnering with security vendors to develop original content. For the past six years, this partnership has produced white papers, case studies, and an online presentation series that showcases subject matter expertise with impartiality and context. </p><p>We hope you will find that this collection of 2016 papers instructive and educational. The experts representing distinct solutions often use their own products and services to illustrate points about technologies used or practices chosen, but the information is designed to be a useful addition to your broader efforts to keep abreast of the advancing security industry.​</p><h4>No Train. No Gain</h4><p><strong>By G4S</strong></p><p>A cross sectors and industries, employee training becomes a vulnerable budget item in challenging </p><p>economic environments, and the security industry is no different. As organizations seek to boost competitiveness and profitability through cost reduction, business processes are identified for reduction or elimination. All too often training is seen as expendable, rather than a strategic necessity. </p><p>Research shows that effective training affects profitability, competitiveness, employee engagement, and customer satisfaction. A recent webinar sponsored by G4S and hosted by Security Management magazine emphasizes the importance of maintaining an adequate employee training program. This paper and the companion webinar, which is available at no cost, explore the impact that such programs have on an organization’s culture, reputation, and bottom line.</p><p><strong>Successful Companies Have Strong Employees.</strong></p><p>For every company, organizational strength is directly linked to the performance of its employees. According to a recent IBM survey of C-suite managers, 71 percent of CEOs rank human capital above products, customer relationships, and brands as the leading source of sustained economic value. </p><p>For the security industry, which is primarily service-based, employees constitute the product itself. Training security officers, therefore, not only improves the individual employee but also advances the interests of the organization. The same IBM survey found a correlation between training and organizational success, noting that 84 percent of employees in the best performing organizations receive the training they need compared with 16 percent in the worst performing companies. </p><p>Employees who are given the skills to do their jobs well and the support to grow their abilities and take on greater responsibility become more effective in their roles. Personal development of each individual employee helps produce long-lasting competencies and increases an employee’s motivation. </p><p>Most managers recognize that training is critical to project success. A majority of global leaders surveyed by IBM (65 percent) cited talent and leadership shortages as their top business challenge. At the same time, leaders at most of the organizations surveyed believe employees are currently receiving the training they need. Seven out of 10 human resources professionals said employees were being adequately trained, a number that rises to eight out of 10 among senior management. In many organizations, there is a disconnect between what decision-makers think about the level of training provided and what recipients feel that they need.</p><p>The Association for Talent Development reports that training and development supports business growth more than 75 percent of the time. They also note that large organizations have an advantage when designing, implementing, and budgeting for training programs compared to employees at midsize companies. While larger employers often have generous learning expenditure budgets, they typically spend less per employee than midsize organizations. This is because the cost to develop and maintain the training and development program is spread among more employees. </p><p>As a result, employees at large organizations typically receive more training hours than their counterparts at midsize organizations. On average, large organizations report that their employees received 36 hours of training, or approximately 4.5 days, compared to midsize organizations, which report that their employees received 27 hours of training, or nearly 3.5 days. At the same direct learning expenditure per employee, large organizations were able to provide an extra day of training to their employees. </p><p><strong>Safety and Risk Mitigation.</strong></p><p>Employee training and staff development helps organizations mitigate risk and has a considerable impact on safety for the organization, stakeholders, and the public. A 2008 Michigan State study found that U.S. security services is a $7 billion industry, employing 1.1 million unarmed security officers compared to 833,000 police officers. This study demonstrates that security officers play an increasing role in public safety.</p><p>Safety and risk mitigation are issues that security professionals help clients address on a daily basis. Employee training is a risk mitigation strategy that is measurable and can affect the bottom line. Training prevents unsafe environments that arise when workers lack the knowledge and skills required to use equipment and supplies safely, which could result in injury or death. A company that fails to train staff adequately should expect an increase in expenses related to medical care, damaged equipment, compensating customers for defective products, and lawsuits. </p><p>For example, as a result of an inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, one security company was cited with 15 alleged safety violations and faced penalties totaling $149,250. The majority of the proposed fine ($140,000) was for four willful citations for failing to train workers on recognizing hazardous situations and slip, trip, and fall prevention. </p><p>According to the U.S. Department of Labor, slips, trips, and falls cause 15 percent of all accidental deaths, second to motor vehicles, and are the number one cause of injury and lost working time in the world. In 2014, G4S implemented a Slip, Trip & Fall Safety Campaign to reduce preventable incidents and emphasize the importance of safety at their work sites. In the first year of the campaign, the company saw a 5 percent reduction in incidents, a 25 percent reduction in slip, trip, and fall costs, and a 27 percent reduction in average cost per incident. </p><p>Campaigns like the one implemented by G4S also provide opportunities to document processes or routines, a best practice that is a positive byproduct of training. Documenting processes mitigates risk and compensates for the absence of skill of individual employees.  </p><p><strong>Create a Learning Culture.</strong></p><p>Organizations that prioritize training and development minimize turnover, create an environment of continuous performance improvement, and improve customer satisfaction. An investment in training is an investment in employees. It increases motivation, making employees more positive, productive, and valuable to the organization over the long term. </p><p>Employee turnover costs organizations time, human capital, and money. Turnover of new hires is particularly costly. Since recruiting new staff is more expensive than retaining existing staff, appropriate training is imperative. Research shows that employees who do not feel they can achieve their career goals at their current organization are 12 times more likely to consider leaving than employees who do feel they can achieve their goals. New employees are 30 times more likely to consider leaving. </p><p>Staff development and education dramatically improve employee retention. The larger the gap between the skills required to perform a task and the actual skills of employees, the greater their dissatisfaction and the higher the turnover. According to IBM, new employees are 42 percent more likely to stay in their current position when they receive the training they need to perform the job properly. Conversely, employees who do not feel they can achieve their career goals at their current organization are 12 times more likely to consider leaving than employees who do feel they can achieve their career goals. </p><p>Training contributes to a learning culture in other ways as well. It strengthens the leadership skills of those implementing the training and creates opportunities for feedback, from manager to employee but also from employee to manager. It promotes the open communication necessary for a positive work environment. Finally, without proper training, it is difficult to promote or hire internally for positions higher up in the corporate hierarchy. </p><p><strong>Providing Value for Stakeholders.</strong></p><p>The benefits of a skilled workforce affect all areas of the organization from sales and marketing to customer service and support, and these efficiencies add value for stakeholders. </p><p>Research shows that adequate training improves communication and helps employees establish a greater number of positive working relationships, improving the employee’s experience as well as performance and customer service. Improved team skills ensured that objectives were met 90 percent more often. Strengthening team skills by only 1/3 increased the likelihood that stakeholders would meet their objectives from 10 to 100 percent, according to the IBM survey. </p><p>The International Data Corporation reported a $70,000 annual savings and 10 percent increase in productivity when teams were well trained, and an IBM case study pointed to 22 percent faster rollouts of products and processes. </p><p><strong>Training Methods.</strong></p><p>Many organizations are already training employees in customer service, legal authority, access control, and fire and life safety, as well as first aid, CPR and AED. Companies might consider expanding training further to include topics like ethics, conflict resolution, de-escalation, or how to interact with local and state officials who respond in emergencies. </p><p>Training and education are most productive when they are ongoing and continuous, but every training opportunity need not be a huge commitment of resources. Training formats vary and require different levels of resource commitment. Organizations may invest in big campaigns like the G4S Slip, Trip & Fall initiative, but a monthly meeting that addresses new industry trends or regulations is a small but worthwhile training effort as well. When preparing for a project, teams receiving 40 hours of training per member met their significant project objectives three times as often as teams that received 30 hours of training or less.</p><p>Some training methods include: </p><p> • Lectures – Usually take place in a classroom format and are led by a trainer or instructor covering specific topics.</p><p> • On-the-job training – Relies on employees to recognize the skills and knowledge they will need as they perform their work and then develop those skills on their own.</p><p> • Coaching and mentoring – Gives employees a chance to receive training one-on-one from an experienced professional and gives trainees the chance to ask questions and receive thorough, honest answers. </p><p> • Role playing – Allows employees to act out issues that could occur in the workplace. Key skills often touched upon are negotiating and teamwork. </p><p> • Technology-based learning – Includes basic PC-based programs; interactive media, using a PC-based CD-ROM; interactive video, using a computer and a VCR; web-based training programs. </p><p> • Technical training – Focuses on a specific need of specific employees.</p><p> • Outdoor training – Employs physical and mental activities that encourage teamwork and help develop collaborative skills. </p><p> • Case Studies – Provide trainees with a chance to analyze and discuss real workplace issues. They develop analytical and problem-solving skills and provide practical illustrations of principle or theory.  </p><p><strong>Lessons Learned.</strong></p><p>Leaders of top performing organizations understand the importance of training, education, and staff development at every level. Fostering an environment of continuous learning reaps benefits for the employee, the organization, and stakeholders. Training should be ongoing and processes should be documented as a strategy for mitigating the absence of skill of individual employees. As competition among businesses in the security industry increases, having an effective employee training program can be the difference between failure and success.</p><p>​<br></p><h4>Leveraging Business Intelligence in Your Security Strategy</h4><p><strong>By iView Systems</strong></p><p>Today, nothing is more critical to security and loss prevention operations than meaningful data. Every department within the operation bears the responsibility to not only provide useful data, but to continually improve the value of that data. Business Intelligence is used to help companies gain insight into their operations; segment and target customers to improve customer security, safety and experience while finding anomalies in the heaps of data to run more efficiently and effectively </p><p>This white paper explores how to change the game for your company. Learn how to collect and, leverage data to achieve effective loss prevention, risk mitigation, efficient fraud detection, incident analysis and monitoring. </p><p><strong>Harness Big Data.</strong></p><p>Today, the sources and volume of data collected have exploded. Security operations collect every event and incident from every transaction from various sources including alarms, environmental sensors, intrusion-detection systems and video surveillance.</p><p>The goal of a modern security department includes a set of processes and supporting technologies for data management to allow security practionitioners greater flexibility in cobbling together disparate systems into a unified security control system that enables Security Directors to know exactly what’s going on, in  real-time while providing analysis to generate actionable items that can give security operations the agility it needs in times of crises.</p><p>We define “big data” as a capability that allows companies to extract value from large volumes of data. Like any capability, it requires investments in technologies, processes and governance.</p><p>There is no doubt that business intelligence software provides the ability to analyze a multitude of transactions and information on one centralized platform, empowering users to capture, analyze and glean actionable insight, hidden in the layers of data within the enterprise. Data-driven risk management requires situational awareness that can only come from a systemic and holistic approach. True value comes from correlating large amounts of incident and security data and presenting it in an visually appealing format, whereby users are able to quickly draw conclusions act on it in in a timely manner.</p><p>Nowhere is this more true than in the security function, where protection can be only as complete as situational awareness. By giving safety, security, risk management and loss prevention managers the ability to track, organize and analyze their data via configurable dashboard visualizations, BI software can provide context and comparison of security related information. This context moves the risk capabilities of an organization toward prevention from a traditional reporting and documentation function, providing the ability to show causality and structure, while giving insight into security and safety related issues.</p><p>More than 86 percent of respondents to a June 2016 survey by CIO Insight now say that BI is important to their company and intrinsic to their role. Global revenue in the business intelligence and analytics market will grow more than 5 percent in 2016, reaching $16.9 billion this year according to a recent Gartner forecast. But it is only now that BI and analytics have matured enough that the market is offering easy-to-use, agile products designed for specific business functions. Off-the-shelf software products provide data in a way that can be incorporated into larger enterprise BI. They are grounded in specific functions in a way that fills the gap between the promise of BI and the reality of its application in the business unit and in small- to medium-sized businesses. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider the iTrak® Business Intelligence package available from iView Systems. While there are many competitors in the BI field—many of which are already in use in organizations that have not adopted BI for security—iView software is built specifically for the needs of security, surveillance and loss prevention. Unlike SAP, Microsoft BI, IBM Cognos, and other enterprise-level BI solutions, iTrak® is not a software that needs to be bent to the task of security and loss prevention through extensive customization and programming, but one that can be immediately deployed to produce results. </p><p><strong>Business Intelligence with Roots in Security and Loss Prevention.</strong></p><p>BI is not shaping just the practice of security and loss prevention, but also their overall role in the enterprise. “In the security and related risk fields, data comes in an unending stream from every device and direction,” says Martin Drew, president of iView Systems. Harnessing that data provides operational insights that create greater organizational efficiencies.  The investment in security is no longer just about protecting assets—but about leveraging those capabilities to create a financial return that is directly attributable to that investment. </p><p>Security practitioners have long competed at a disadvantage with other departments that made demonstrable connections to the financial bottom line. As the IT function became more integrated with security operations, the requirement to “make a business case” became the challenge for every upgrade or new investment.  But as Avi Perez, the chief technical officer for Pyramid Analytics writes, the best practices of business intelligence are not about making business cases, but about solving problems. </p><p>The iTrak® BI application was built explicitly for the security function and is rooted in just that—detecting anomalies in your data to to solve problems. The first and most obvious return on investment BI makes is in the reduction of manual security processes. Fully 76 percent of midsize or larger companies (more than 500 employees) relied on a manual processes for exception alert reporting from physical security systems as recently as two years ago according ASIS International research. Fewer than 30 percent of these same organizations had invested in business intelligence at that time. Considering that fully 71 percent of companies were using BI in some aspect of their operations as early as 2012, this represented a comparatively slow adoption rate by security practitioners. iView Systems committed to change these statistics with its iTrak® BI and found one of the most ready sectors to be the gaming industry. </p><p>“Casinos would spend as much as five days of every month just doing required manual reports,” says Giselle Chen, senior business intelligence analyst at iView Systems.  Automating that process can virtually eliminate that time requirement, improve the accuracy of reports, while speeding  the dissemination of the information to all identified stakeholders by simply scheduling the reports to run at whatever required interval.</p><p>“Several dashboards can eliminate virtually hundreds of reports and provide the ability to quickly drill down from the highest summary to as many established groups and sub-groups as required—even down to individual incidents,” says Chen. The investigation is not conducted through reams of paper, but by highly intuitive paths navigated by the simple click of a mouse. An international organization such as a hotel would be able to identify gaps in efficiency as the aggregate effect impacts the overall organization. Users can also expect a substantial decline in errors. While errors will always occur, through BI they can be addressed at a systems-wide process level and fixed once. With manual reporting, a certain persistent level of error exists mostly as occurrences at the incident report level. Training and active monitoring can help to reduce these, but human error is simply the cost of doing business with manual processes.</p><p><strong>Data Visualization: A New View.</strong></p><p>From this larger awareness, gaps can be explored and analyzed by specific regions, types of properties, or seasons of the year. This is the nature of how BI and analytics provide established reports and dashboards to raise situational awareness while providing ad hoc reporting to investigate the source of problems. Throughout the process, data visualizations depict the rows and columns of raw data in an intuitive format. Incident reports presented as bar charts immediately draw the eye to anomalies. Pie charts, heat maps and bubble graphs all create pictures that more directly engage the problem-solving capacity of the human brain. </p><p>By filtering out all the steps it takes to get from raw data to the dashboard display, BI software makes it easier and faster for end users to understand the information and how it relates to their department and operations using customizable data visualizations and dashboards.</p><p><strong>Showing the Big Picture as Well as Supporting Details.</strong></p><p>Another early win that has application in every security environment is reducing the impact of false alarms. “As much as 80 percent of any front-line security officer’s day can consist of responding to false alarms,” says Chen. The high rate of false alarms inflates the number of personnel required to guard a facility and can reduce the response time to actual incidents—increasing costs, while lowering efficiency. </p><p>With BI, supervisors have a real-time awareness of how their resources are allocated—where officers are dispatched, which officers are on break while distinguishing proprietary from contract staff and armed from unarmed officers. </p><p><strong>Self-Service business intelligence (SSBI)</strong></p><p>Self-Service BI enables business end users to rapidly design, deploy and analyze reliable data, at a relatively low cost to a business unit, with less dependence on IT.</p><p>“Reports are highly customizable and the training to use the BI toolset can take as little as 10 minutes,” says Chen. “Once a system is implemented, much of the data is already customized according to the requirements of the facility and the organization. The data, entered once, can serve many purposes without the burden of multiple entry in different systems. </p><p>From there end users can create and customize dashboards and reports with a simple drag-and-drop. This ad hoc capability to create new scenarios, combine disparate data sources and explore a variety of permutations and parameters of data are all part of a mature BI system that no longer requires extensive programming competencies. </p><p>The key to the success of iTrak® Bi is the fact that users don’t need IT experts by their side to work with the data presented in the dashboard. Users can access the dashboards, manipulate and analyze data and bring in other members of a team to work together on certain data analysis projects.</p><p><strong>Moving from Reaction to Prevention and Prediction</strong></p><p>The value proposition for BI in the security sector is not limited to creating efficiencies. Oft-cited in the industry literature is the capability for retail facilities to mine surveillance systems to better understand traffic patterns and position products with a data-driven understanding of their environment. Surveillance systems can also be used to monitor and enforce safety practices in warehouses and other environments where injuries are common. Access control systems and computer log-ins can provide international businesses with better awareness of how remote facilities are being used and create savings through fine-tuning HVAC systems and even reducing and increasing office footprints according to actual needs. </p><p><strong>A Look Ahead at BI.</strong></p><p>Data is the water we swim in today. We are creators and consumers of data and wielders of the intelligence it provides. The most substantial impact in 2017 will be the continued deployment of specialized BI platforms from analytic packages which come with an integrated set of tools, data schemas, business views, and predefined reports and dashboards that significantly accelerate the time it takes to get a BI solution up and running. </p><p>Packaged applications like iTrak®BI allow organizations to deploy BI on a small scale for a single department and then expand seamlessly to support other departments using the same model and platform, delivering a consistent view of enterprise information.  </p><p>BI will move increasingly to cloud deployments and mobile platforms with data security as the prime governor in the transition and the total cost of ownership will continue to drop and the realized return on investment will continue to grow quickly </p><p>Within a decade, the way we did business 10 years ago will be unrecognizable. The fundamentals of security and loss prevention will remain familiar, but how their function partners with other departments and contributes to the mission of the organization as a whole will be limited only by the imagination of the practitioner.</p><p>​<br></p><h4>Emergency Towers: The Case for Safety in K–12</h4><p><strong>By Talkaphone</strong></p><p>The perception and practice of security in primary schools around the United States changed one December day in 2012.  The tragedy that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut was a tipping point. Those charged with the security of K-12 school facilities across the country looked to their own charges with a collective sense of urgency. </p><p>“With everything in the media and some of the major events occurring, not only in our country, but also abroad, we’re coming to a better realization that some of these incidents could occur anywhere,” said Chief of Police Alan Bragg of Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District in Texas.  </p><p>Cypress-Fairbanks is the third largest school district in Texas, providing education to more than 115,000 students in an area spanning more than 186 square miles. Eleven high schools, eighteen middle schools, and fifty-six elementary schools comprise Chief Bragg’s charge. </p><p><strong>Working with the District</strong></p><p>In 2014 the district passed a $1.2 billion bond, setting the stage for massive security, transportation, and infrastructure upgrades aimed at preparing the district for large-scale growth. With two to three thousand students added each year, just keeping up with growth is a primary challenge.</p><p>But Bragg, who came to Cypress-Fairbanks four years ago to start the police department, is ready for the challenge. He credits the school bond with empowering his team to create an environment that provides the best solutions to protect students, staff, and community members.</p><p>Key to those upgrades are 67 Talkaphone blue light emergency towers with call stations to be installed throughout the district. The blue light systems will be placed in strategic locations where the community tends to gather.</p><p>Bragg is not new to the advantages of Talkaphone. When he was leading police efforts at Spring Hill Independent School District, another large school district in Texas, Bragg credits a blue light system for saving a life when there was a medical emergency at a school athletic event. Because the blue light tower was integrated with the access control system, dispatchers were able to remotely open a door and give access to a life-saving automated external defibrillator (AED) system. Without that AED when and where it was needed, the outcome would likely have been different.</p><p>“When things go bad and an emergency occurs, sometimes cell phones aren’t available,” Bragg said. “Having that extra device out there could also be a lifesaver for us.” When response time is critical, the towers also offer the advantage of known location</p><p><strong>Installation Considerations.</strong></p><p>At Cypress-Fairbanks, the Talkaphone towers will be installed in centrally located areas where a lot of traffic is likely. Many of the schools are on what Bragg calls a “triplex”—a campus that includes a high school, middle school, and elementary school.</p><p>Each triplex will include a tower with a camera that will be placed in front of the high school, near a large parking area. Two additional camera-enabled towers will be placed near the athletics complex and in another central location.</p><p>Bragg’s goal is to place the towers where they can be accessible by almost everybody. Strategic sites have been identified across each of the Cypress-Fairbanks campuses and installation began in the summer of 2016.</p><p>While the shootings at Sandy Hook precipitated a far-reaching investment in security in schools around the country, the fact is, violence on K-12 campuses is a common experience. According to a report by the United States Bureau of Justice Statistics, Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015, there were 53 school-associated violent deaths from July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013. In 2014 there were about 850,100 nonfatal victimizations at school, resulting in 363,700 thefts; and 486,400 violent victimizations, which include everything from simple assault to serious violence.</p><p>For Bragg, preventing these far more common threats is his day-to-day charge. That’s why his department functions just like any other police department, with round-the-clock monitoring and trained professionals on duty. </p><p>“It’s a 24-hour operation for our police department,” he said. “We monitor all our district burglar alarms and access control. Everything is handled by our police department.” </p><p>Soon Bragg will add those 67 Talkaphone towers to the list of tools his police department uses to secure the district’s campuses. He said he’s looking forward to the ability to turn on a camera at the device location and help diagnose a threat before arriving. Each of his blue light systems will allow the user to autodial directly into the Cypress-Fairbanks dispatch center.</p><p><strong>The K-12 Environment.</strong></p><p>Blue Light towers have been a staple on college campuses for decades, but have only recently begun to be deployed at primary and secondary school locations like those in Cypress-Fairbanks. The reasons are numerous, but Bragg and other industry experts think media coverage and heightened public awareness contribute to the pressure the public has begun to exert on its local schools.</p><p>Bragg said that it is not uncommon for him to receive a call from parents considering a move into the district. “Some of their questions revolve around crime statistics and if we’re safe,” he said. “Parents ask those questions now. It’s important to them.”</p><p>Today’s society is hyper-aware about security issues. Parents actively inquire about physical safety measures alongside the more traditional considerations such as class size and educational testing results. Those distinguishing factors ripple outward as successful schools create desirable neighborhoods which in turn drive local economies. To that end, the highly visible Blue Light towers are powerful symbols of security infrastructure. </p><p>While parental demands for greater protections are common, it is still unusual for school districts to have formally trained life safety professionals on staff such as Bragg at Cypress-Fairbanks. Life-long educators are not police and before investing in significant upgrades, it behooves schools to reach out to professionals that can conduct a thorough risk assessment and make thoughtful recommendations that will likely include both obvious and less-obvious security precautions. </p><p>Sometimes in budget discussions and even the occasional story in the media there will be a question as to how much security is actually needed. The plain fact is that the media does gravitate to school violence in ways that may raise fears out of proportion with actual risk. On the whole, K-12 schools are very safe places compared to the world that often surrounds them. </p><p>But school systems are legally accountable for a duty to protect students. This duty requires school officials anticipate potential and foreseeable dangers and take reasonable measures to safeguard children. </p><p>While secondary schools are the subject of a higher frequency of published negligence litigation, primary schools have a far higher proportion of judgements decided against them. Younger students are considered more vulnerable which places a higher duty of care on the school.  Ultimately, the decision will fall to a jury comprised of people who read the same media coverage of school violence. </p><p>Funding is the other obvious challenge. The simple fact is that most school districts are forced into making hard decisions with the budgets they are allocated. In such environments, it can be difficult to know where to start. </p><p><strong>Making Budgets Work.</strong></p><p>Bragg is quick to acknowledge these concerns, but believes parents and elected school officials will advocate for needed changes when they see the value in a blue light system. </p><p>“You can start with a basic device and you can get basic features that will enhance some of the security levels on your campus and then add other features as funds become available,” he said. “Sometimes picking a basic system to enhance security is a good first step. That’s important.”</p><p>Bragg adds that, in his years working with school districts, he’s witnessed parents mobilizing when the issue is important enough. “You’d be surprised how many times parents get together and say, ‘you know, that’s really great, I wish we had another one back behind the athletics fields’. Then they’ll do a fundraiser and car wash to help find the funds to make that school even safer,” he said.</p><p>Installing a Blue Light system, similar to those favored by Cypress-Fairbanks, doesn’t have to be a budget breaker and the return on investment is immediately felt in the deterrent factor created by the high visibility of the product. The towers, which stand more than 9-feet tall, can be modified to meet various needs and price points. Cameras, two-way broadcast systems, and even an AED can be stationed inside the tower. </p><p>The Talkaphone systems are built on an open platform that can be integrated with current standard communication systems and third-party vendors. This approach means that Talkaphone can easily be retrofitted into an existing environment without the need for numerous and costly upgrades—a major appeal for large and established districts like Cypress-Fairbanks. </p><p>The Talkaphone system operates on the standard Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), which means it will work with most major or modern Voice over IP (VOIP) phone systems on the market. Talkaphone devices can also send a digital output that can communicate with other central server systems, such as access control. This means that secondary or tertiary events, such as a lockdown or camera call-ups, can be triggered from the Talkaphone device. </p><p>Finally, mass notification capability is differentiator of the product, triggering notifications over the company’s Wide-Area Emergency Broadcast System (WEBSTM) to provide mass broadcasts and notifications that keep classrooms, offices, buildings, outdoor areas, and entire districts connected.</p><p><strong>Strategic Visibility.</strong></p><p>For Cypress-Fairbanks, the Blue Light towers are the most visible, public-facing, security upgrade to the campuses. Several other changes have been made behind the scenes to make the district a leader in securing its students. </p><p>VOIP phone systems are being installed this summer as are several new CCTV cameras—40 new cameras in each high school, 20 in each middle school, and 10 in each elementary. All of these upgrades work together to create a cohesive security program that provides the police department with the information and tools they need to do their jobs. </p><p>Equally important, however, is the fact that with the Blue Light system, each visitor to campus is empowered to keep themselves and their fellow community members safe. Even at night, Bragg knows that the towers will remain lit and visible and the only thing a user needs to do to find help quickly is push a button.</p><p>It is no accident that the Cypress-Fairbanks towers are placed in highly trafficked areas. “Our district is a very busy and active district with a lot of community involvement in the evenings,” said Bragg. For example, during the busy high school football season, the two football stadiums are in use from Thursday through Saturday during the week between late August and early December.</p><p>Bragg said that with a district as diverse as his, cellphones are not a given. Additionally, in events where quick intervention is required and first responders need to be called, the towers eliminate the hesitation that may come from not knowing what number to call.</p><p>At the end of the day, Bragg’s operational focus is strategic. “We’re being proactive and preventive,” he said. “Not a day goes by that we don’t talk about the safety and security of our staff, students, and facilities. It’s a priority for me and our district.​</p><h4>Cloud-Based Security Integration</h4><p><strong>By Team Software</strong></p><p>Without WinTeam, Jayson Yao believes he would have never landed one of his biggest customers. His company, 50 State Security Service, Inc., was seeking a government contract, and the client required customized billing. “The way that they needed their billing was the most complicated billing we had ever encountered. And because we were on WinTeam, we were able to furnish the detailed billing they needed,” Yao said. “It also had to match up to the biometric reports that WinTeam receives. If we weren’t on WinTeam, we couldn’t have complied with the invoicing.”</p><p>Yao, chief financial officer and vice president of 50 State, said his company was able to further cement the contract through an integrated customer self-service portal, which allowed the client to access 50 State’s officers’ schedules. “With the customer self-service portal, it was very easy for us to give them access to scheduling,” Yao said. “Without WinTeam, this would have been next to impossible to provide.” </p><p>WinTeam is an integrated, cloud-based software system developed by and for contractors in the building service and security industries. Developed by TEAM Software, it delivers financial, operations, and workforce management components to help streamline business processes and deliver a complete picture of profitability. Companies can leverage shared data from throughout their organization, and because it’s a cloud-based solution, data can be accessed from the office, home, or on the road. TEAM Software currently has nearly 400 clients in the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean, with hundreds of thousands of end users. TEAM Software is employee owned and focused on customer service. </p><p>Many companies choose TEAM Software because of the integration of the various components of its software. This integration helps reduce time and resources required to maintain various independent solutions, makes it easier to extract coherent information and reports from the overall system, and helps ensure compliance more efficiently. “We have everything from not only the operation side of the business and workforce management, but we also incorporate payroll and human resources and then tie it all to the backend, which is the general ledger for financial reporting,” said Jill Davie, TEAM Software senior vice president of client experience. “So having all of that information in one database and one system, where information flows seamlessly from one area to the next, is definitely the advantage of using TEAM Software.”</p><p>If companies are not using an integrated package like WinTeam, they may be using paper systems, spreadsheets, or unrelated software applications. Those systems may offer individual pieces like scheduling or payroll, but they will not be integrated with the backend general ledger. So then companies must purchase an additional accounting package and figure out how to make the various systems talk to each other. Companies may be working with multiple vendors, facing implementation issues, and struggling with ongoing costs and maintenance. </p><p>“WinTeam is focused on security companies, so their scheduling is really strong for that type of business,” said Betty Ritts, vice president of information technology at AlliedBarton Security Services. “It integrates compliance with it, so many of our officers’ licenses for various state requirements as well as armed licensing is integrated. Also, the scheduling is integrated with payroll and billing, so it keeps it all together. That makes it much easier if you have to go back and audit for a client. And there’s a lot of good bells and whistles to help us to manage the business.”</p><p>“We switched to TEAM Software because of the added versatility and added capability,” said Denis Kelly, executive vice president of Sunstates Security. He said his company made the switch in 2008 because of the integrated accounting, payroll, and scheduling functions that were offered, enabling users to run reports and analyze data. </p><p>In the end, businesses see a financial gain because they can get a complete picture of their profitability and make better business decisions, especially as they face shrinking margins and increasing competition. “It’s saving them time, making them more efficient, and getting them better insights into their business,” said Scott Gauger, TEAM Software director of sales. “There are a lot of different individual software solutions, but putting them all in a consolidated, integrated package—there aren’t that many out there.”​</p><p><strong>Integrated Features.</strong></p><p>WinTeam offers comprehensive financial and accounting management capabilities and allows companies to manage their workforce effectively with powerful scheduling tools. Companies can save time by creating weekly work schedules from permanent master schedules, then manage exceptions at a glance, like overlapping shifts, overtime, or compliance issues. The compliance tracker tool helps ensure that employees meet job requirements, like special licensing or training. Scheduling information is seamlessly integrated with accounts receivable and payroll, so companies can bill customers with accurate and timely information. The software also allows companies to track inventory and equipment issued to employees or jobs and monitor supply levels and costs. </p><p>WinTeam includes human resources tools to help companies administer insurance benefits in compliance with Affordable Care Act (ACA) employer regulations. Because timekeeping and human resources data is contained in one system, companies can easily determine employee benefits eligibility based on hours worked. In addition, all benefits and eligibility data is captured and available for ACA reporting and compliance. </p><p>Customers appreciate the many different features of WinTeam. For example, Barry Williamson, chief financial officer of GMI Integrated Facility Solutions, said his company finds the integrated system makes job cost reporting easier. “You can run an onscreen job cost on your computer, and there are drill downs to the source of every single number. So if accounts payable is involved, you drill down and see the accounts payable invoice that makes up the entry. If it’s revenue, then you can drill down to the customer invoice that makes up the revenue. You can drill right down to the daily time sheet through payroll to see where those numbers are coming from. It’s the same with inventory,” Williamson said. “Without even getting out of your chair, you can see every component that makes up the revenues and costs to see where you’re missing the budget or where you’re performing well against budget.”</p><p>WinTeam’s features work especially well in the security industry, where scheduling and licensing play such an important role. Companies can use the system to make sure officers are where they need to be at the right time and that they’re qualified for the job. Plus, the integrated mobile features mean information from WinTeam can be used by supervisors and officers in the field, in real time.</p><p>The personnel scheduling feature allows companies to track where they need to place officers based on their clients’ needs. In addition, workforce tools help managers ensure officers report to the site. With integrated time and attendance features, employees can clock in via telephone, biometric time clock or on their mobile device, and that timekeeping information is updated back in WinTeam from the field. Plus, the system will post alerts when officers do not report to duty. “They get a bird’s eye view of the entire operation, including all shifts that are currently active or will be active in the next hour,” said Mike Straub, TEAM Software senior vice president of software development. “They’re able to see all of the activity and all of the exceptions as they happen.”</p><p>Compliance has been a core component of WinTeam for more than 15 years. Companies can enter requirements at the job level, and then monitor whether employees have the proper licensing and training. When companies schedule employees for a shift, they can check to see if their licensing has expired. “The system will either warn or even not allow people to be scheduled based on that compliance,” Straub said. In addition, a compliance alert engine will allow companies to notify officers when licenses are coming due, so that companies can be proactive in making sure their officers have all that they need to be put in place. </p><p>Kelly, from SunStates Security, said TEAM Software has helped his company track compliance and training for its employees. “We have several hundred courses available for our people, from initial training to ongoing learning to customized courses,” Kelly said. “When someone takes a course, the challenge is tracking their results and ultimately seeing how they’re progressing as an employee. All of that information flows into WinTeam, so we can see everything from their initial background checks to when they’ve been hired and all the training they’ve completed.”</p><p>The mobile features offered by TEAM also work well in the security industry, allowing supervisors to access the information in the field so they can make good decisions about scheduling employees or finding the appropriate kind of employees to work. TEAM Software’s employee and customer self-service solution can be used on Android and Apple devices, with a downloadable app. Everyone in the company, from supervisors to employees, can use the app to see their schedules or retrieve their paystubs. And because most people are accustomed to using an app, it’s user friendly. </p><p> “With our mobile and web offering, we’re really trying to penetrate the entire organization of our customers. We want to bring our solutions all the way to the security officers, so the officers can benefit from receiving their paychecks through a mobile device,” Straub said. “We can even bring the technology to our clients’ own customers. They have customers who need to be able to access invoice information or other various operational types of information, so we’re continuing to improve our customer self-service capabilities so our customers can provide more information to their customers.” </p><p>Kelly said his company relies heavily on the mobile application, which allows managers to do quality assurance checks, compliance reports, and inspections in the field. Because officers have access to their schedules and paystubs on their mobile phones, those mobile features save time, which can be put back into improving customer service and growing the business.</p><p><strong>Roots in the Security Industry.</strong></p><p>TEAM Software was formed in the 1980s in Omaha, Nebraska. It all started when a building service and security contracting company was hunting for an integrated, industry-specific management system to help organize operations, streamline accounting processes, and provide insight into profitability. The company couldn’t find any existing solution that could do exactly what it wanted, so it put together a small team to build one of its own. Six years later, the team had developed the prototype for what is now known as WinTeam. Frank Labedz, the CFO and software project lead, realized that this unique solution could make a significant difference for other businesses, so he started a new company to offer the solution to other contractors.</p><p>Some 25 years later, TEAM Software still remembers its roots in the security industry. “We tailored the software around the security business, where what drives everything is your labor, your hourly workers. That drives your billing and your payroll, your margins and profitability,” said TEAM Software’s Davie. “So focusing our system around that piece of the software gave us an advantage in speaking the language of these companies—understanding that if you manage your labor and your workforce, that will drive your profitability and your success.”</p><p>Davie said TEAM Software actively promotes its product in the security industry, attending trade shows regularly and connecting with its customers face to face. TEAM Software also hosts its own annual conference for clients.</p><p>GMI’s Williamson said his company has taken advantage of the networking opportunities offered by TEAM Software. “TEAM’s yearly conference has evolved from a meeting that was basically sitting around in a hotel room to a large hotel gathering with hundreds of people. It’s come a long way,” Williamson said. “That environment is great to meet with people who are doing what you are doing and who have the same challenges as you do. It’s a good opportunity to talk with your peers.”</p><p>TEAM Software stresses not only its background in the security industry, but also its focus on customer service. The company became employee owned in 2007, with each employee owning stock in the company. The company was looking to reward its employees for all their hard work and wanted its employees to have a stake in the success of the company. And because they have a vested interest in TEAM Software’s success, they understand that they are only successful if their customers are satisfied. </p><p> “One of the key things we hang our hat on is great customer service, providing our clients with appropriate answers to their questions in a timely manner and following up on their needs,” TEAM’s Gauger said. TEAM Software offers a dedicated support department that answers customers’ calls, an implementation and education department that helps new clients, and ongoing training of existing clients for new products as they are brought out. </p><p>Ritts from AlliedBarton said TEAM Software listens to its clients. “Staff are very good about taking feedback and suggestions from their clients, especially when they’re going to change things or add new functionally. They’re very good about reaching out to clients for their input and brainstorming through things,” Ritts said. “They also stay on top of new things as they relate to payroll regulations, such as the ACA. And they let their customers know, so they’re a good source of information for their clients.” </p><p>The fact that TEAM Software is employee owned results in other benefits to its customers as well. “Our customers in the security industry know turnover and costs related to turnover. So being employee-owned reduces our turnover, which increases quality and efficiency and our ability to deliver,” said Straub. “We’re able to retain an amount of knowledge. Because that knowledge is not walking out the door every two or three years, we’re able to be a lot more efficient.”</p><p>By promoting a culture of strong customer service in the security industry, TEAM Software employees build strong relationships with their clients. “They’re more than a vendor, they’re a consultant,” Yao said. “They’re a resource that I use,  so it’s not only about how their software can help us. They have their finger on the pulse of the industry, so I can get feedback from them on the trends in the security industry.”</p><p><strong>Future Plans.</strong></p><p>Providing good customer service also means keeping abreast of changes in technology. TEAM Software made an early move to the cloud in 2001. While customers used to receive software and install it on their own computers, now most new businesses use the cloud, and more and more customers are coming to expect that type of service. The cloud makes it easier for companies to get on board, since they no longer have to purchase equipment like servers, install a network, and get everything up and running. </p><p>TEAM Software will continue to expand the technological capabilities of its software. “We’re on the cusp of bringing all that technology to a more central unified technology, meaning bringing our Windows application forward to be more of a Web-based solution,” Straub said. “That’s where our future belongs: trying to bring our entire set of platforms together as one suite of offerings so that it’s a more of a seamless and unified solution to all our customers.” </p><p>The company will also respond to the changing landscape, as the security industry sees more consolidation. “There are a lot of mergers and acquisitions happening,” Davie said. “Mid-size companies feel that they can market themselves to an acquiring company because they use our products.  Because we do have three of the top five largest security companies in the industry, some companies have felt that using WinTeam gives them an advantage in selling their business because they can integrate more seamlessly into the buying company if they use WinTeam as well.”</p><p>Davie said TEAM Software will continue to seek opportunities in the security industry and feels that there is room for growth. “It’s important for people to know we’re committed to the industry,” Davie said. “While we may consider branching out and offering our software outside of our niche markets down the road, we do not plan to turn our back on the security industry or leave that market in any way.”​</p><h4>Leveraging the Command Center Investment Enterprise-wide</h4><p><strong>By Christie</strong></p><p>Traditionally, command centers are considered part of the security operations domain. Cameras, intrusion detection systems, video and audio recordings, and alarms are just some of the security-related systems effectively monitored and managed in traditional command centers. </p><p>However, threats to an organization are not limited to physical security, and command centers can process data from a wide range of sources, offering risk mitigation throughout the enterprise. The ubiquity of IP-enabled technology, the increasing access to raw data, and the desire to minimize information silos expand the role of command centers. In this white paper, you will learn how investing in a command center can benefit the entire organization. </p><p><strong>Role Within an Organization</strong></p><p>For decades, certain industries have harnessed the power of a command center to support business operations beyond security. For example, telephone and data providers monitor outages, traffic, and data flow by region. Command centers are ideal for managing operations on waterways, highways, and public transportation networks. </p><p>In general, command centers enhance situational awareness, so events can be managed quickly and effectively. In the security world, that often means responding to physical threats. When a locked door is suddenly opened, an alarm sounds, and a streamlined response begins. </p><p>“In the old days a security guard would consult a notebook, saying, ‘What do we do when door number 32 is opened? Do we send a guard? Point a camera at the door?’” says Richard Derbyshire, CTS-D, consultant relations manager at CHRISTIE Digital Systems. Modern command centers offer an entirely automated environment. </p><p>“The response in the software is to trigger some form of alarm that then alters some aspect on the visual display,” Derbyshire says. “You have an intrusion detection, a connection outage in your security system, or some other abnormality. You also have an automated sequence to point a camera at the door, call up a series of response procedures, or display the scene of intrusion. </p><p>Command centers often feature a large-format, video display. For example, the screen might show a geographical map of a campus or a series of different images that change from green to red when an alarm status is triggered. The anomalous event is clearly registered by everyone in the room and—if required—elsewhere in the organization. What’s more, command centers provide flexible monitoring. Visual displays are networked; they can be monitored remotely, from a laptop, smartphone, or a backup command center. “The shared display within a shared space enhances understanding of what’s going on in the area you are covering,” Derbyshire says.</p><p><strong>Beyond the Security Budget.</strong></p><p>“Command centers are best applied when monitoring systems,” Derbyshire says. “Think of all the different entities in the world that can be construed as systems.”</p><p>Command centers are valuable tools for securing physical assets, but they also provide situational awareness that extends beyond security, mitigating risks, and safeguarding business processes. “Command and control environments are used for multiple aspects of the business, on both the commercial side and the government side,” says Ronald Willis, a senior associate at Shen Milsom & Wilke, LLC, an international technology and acoustical consulting firm.</p><p>For example, a command center can monitor the IT network across the corporation. “It has some aspect of security,” Willis says, “but the cyber guys are doing security. This is network or content monitoring,” he adds. “You might be a software development firm working on a video wall so that everyone can see it and track progress.” </p><p>Integrator Dan Gundry, a senior control room specialist at Vistacom Inc., agrees.  According to Gundry, one of easiest ways to leverage a command center is to integrate IT and physical security. “It provides the ability to leverage the same content to achieve the same goal—protecting the organization’s business interest and its people,” Gundry says. “We’re seeing the integration of both IT and physical security to leverage that investment, leverage the space, and bring operations into alignment.”</p><p>Providing everyone with a common operating picture improves responsiveness and decision-making by assimilating all the right data, Gundry adds. “When you take that concept and you move it beyond, you’re still talking about having the right info at people’s fingertips in a highly functional way.”</p><p>Derbyshire points to universities, which often integrate security functions within their data communications network command centers, either locating them in the same space or in adjoining spaces. “The security command center function is incorporated into the data network design because so much of the security system is an IP system,” he says. “If you lose a part of your IP system, you lose a part of your security system.”</p><p><strong>Supporting the Global Workplace.</strong></p><p>The command center environment also supports global business and information sharing. “If you’re working on a project in Abu Dhabi and you have to talk to an engineer in Chicago, you can do a Skype call and talk to them while sharing content over the network,” Willis says. “That information can be deployed and displayed on a virtual surface, or video wall surface. Whether you have a three-foot-square array or a 10-by-12 foot video wall, it’s still a virtual surface. You can do anything you want on that surface.”</p><p>Willis prefers the term “multi-array deployment” to command center, because the purpose of the technology and the way it is implemented can vary so widely. “I have a customer that has three different conference rooms, and they all have video walls in them,” he says. “They have different size arrays but the main purpose is to be a conference room or multipurpose room.”</p><p><strong>Growing Trend.</strong></p><p>Experts say that command center technology is being used in more building-wide applications, particularly in emergency management, emergency operations, and other specialty buildings where it’s important to have flexible content. While these organizations may have a command center or control room, information must also be sent to breakout rooms, conference rooms, war rooms, and managers’ offices. “Using CHRISTIE’s Phoenix platform as the backbone for video sharing across the enterprise, and within a building, is becoming more commonplace,” Gundry says.  </p><p>Command centers have a greater breadth of scope in an IP-enabled world, because a broad range of devices can be monitored. “Walk into a big building and, in your mind, peel away the finishes,” Derbyshire says. “Look behind and ask, ‘Why does that elevator go to the right floor every time? Why does the escalator stop and start when it’s supposed to, and how are the temperature and humidity controlled?’ They are all systems, and they can all be monitored and controlled by a central network.” </p><p><strong>A Case Study.</strong></p><p>When Ohio’s Hamilton County Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency (EMA) upgraded its facility nearly three years ago, it was looking for a system that was flexible and reliable. “Unlike a lot of security centers, we’re not stagnant,” says Steve Siereveld, the organization’s operations manager and emergency operations center manager. “Most of the time when we looked at security centers, they had the same 20 or 30 displays up all the time,” Siereveld adds. “We switch wall layouts as the incident dictates.”</p><p>The EMA coordinates emergency response to all natural and manmade hazards in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, and 12 counties in three states (Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana). However, its emergency operations center is a 24/7 “warm” facility, which means it is not always occupied. “It’s nothing for weeks and weeks,” Siereveld says. “But when something happens it’s a million miles an hour right out of the gate. We need something that’s quick and responsive.”</p><p>In 2014, the EMA purchased the CHRISTIE Phoenix—a network distributed open content management system for simultaneous encode, decode, and display of AV data—to use with its street and river camera system. Phoenix captures the camera feeds and brings them into a full HD video wall of 32 CHRISTIE Entero high-brightness 67-inch LED cubes. </p><p>“We’re constantly changing and redrawing the screen, and the screen redraws are quick,” he says. “We didn’t need something that took a minute to change screen layouts; we needed it to take a couple of seconds.”</p><p>While the center is equipped to help operators react to large-scale emergency incidents—caused by weather or terrorism, for example—Siereveld says the EMA has not experienced such an event for a few years. Instead, the center is used on a regular basis for planned events throughout the year, like firework displays over the Ohio River; Taste of Cincinnati, one of the nation’s largest street festivals, and the 2015 MLB All-Star Game. </p><p>The organization also uses the operations center for meetings, simulations, exercises, drills, and national homeland security classes. Human resources even uses the facility for employee testing. “There aren’t many places where you can find 54 computers in a room,” Siereveld notes. “They might put a PowerPoint up or just put a timer up on the video wall.”</p><p>Regardless of its use, the command center is a steadfast tool for the EMA. “From a user comfort and the reliability level, CHRISTIE’s technology has been very advantageous for us,” Siereveld says. “With our old system, it was older technology and sometimes it would work and sometimes it wouldn’t. With our current system, I don’t feel the need to fire things up two or three hours ahead of a meeting. I’m comfortable turning it on five minutes beforehand, knowing it will work.”</p><p>From an investment perspective, Siereveld says, “You can’t put a dollar tag on a life.” But he acknowledges that the CHRISTIE system saves the EMA money. With the old system, if a part broke, it had to be ordered from Japan and might take as long as three months to replace. Replacing bulbs cost approximately $50,000. “With the all LED, there’s one moving part, and we have no real maintenance,” Siereveld says. “Also, we have one set of spare components, and we can field swap them. If we do lose a display we can pull a module out and replace it. We’ve never had to do it, but we can if we need to.”</p><p><strong>Conclusion.</strong></p><p>With today’s networked systems and IP-enabled world, command centers can do more than alarm and video monitoring. In the security world, command centers focus primarily on situational awareness of the physical environment. They improve responsiveness by providing all operators with the same picture and positively impact decision-making. The security investment of a command center can now be leveraged throughout the enterprise—to enhance communication, secure supply chains, protect business interests, and contribute to the bottom line.</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Protection-on-Display.aspxProtection on Display<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">While driving from Toledo, Ohio, to New York City in November of 2006, the two drivers of an art transport truck stopped for the night in Pennsylvania at a Howard Johnson Hotel. They parked the truck in an unlit parking lot adjacent to the hotel, out of sight of the hotel’s rooms and the main office.</span></p><p>In the morning, when the drivers returned to the truck, they found the locks on the truck broken and the painting inside, Goya’s Children with Cart, valued at $1.1 million, gone. </p><p>The authorities were notified and an extensive publicity campaign was launched to locate the painting. The Guggenheim Museum, which had planned to display the painting in its upcoming exhibition Spanish Painting from El Greco to Picasso: Time, Truth, and History, released a joint statement with the painting’s home museum, The Art Museum of Toledo. </p><p>The two museums said the painting would be “virtually impossible to sell and therefore has no value on the open market,” in an effort to prevent a clandestine sale. They also announced that the painting’s insurers were offering a reward of $50,000 for any information leading to the recovery of the painting.</p><p>The strategy worked, and the FBI received a tip which led to the recovery of the painting less than two weeks later. It was in “good condition” and appeared to “be unharmed,” the FBI said in a press release announcing the Goya’s recovery.</p><p>That tip came from Steven Lee Olson, 49, who reported that he discovered the painting in his basement. Olson was a self-employed truck driver, and was later charged with stealing the painting himself. </p><p>Olson contacted the FBI, but not for the reward money. “I really wanted to get rid of it,” he told U.S. District Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh in a court proceeding. After stealing the painting with his neighbor, “they realized it was more than they could handle,” Olson’s attorney, Joe Ferrante, said to the AP. </p><p>The two men pleaded guilty to conspiring to steal the painting. Olson, who had a criminal record, was sentenced to five years in prison for his crime and his neighbor, Roman Szurko, received one year and a day.</p><p>While the painting was successfully recovered and eventually returned to Toledo where it’s displayed today, the theft brought new awareness to the security concerns associated with museum special exhibitions.​</p><h4>Planning</h4><p>Located in the middle of America in Bentonville, Arkansas, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is well aware of the challenges that come with transporting art to and from various museums. </p><p>The museum, which opened in 2011, has a collection that spans five centuries of American art ranging from the Colonial era to the current day. Its masterpieces include Asher B. Durand’s Kindred Spirits, Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter, and Andy Warhol’s Dolly Parton—to name a few. </p><p>In addition to its vast collection, the museum also hosts a wide variety of special exhibitions each year. Planning for these exhibitions starts years in advance, says Niki Ciccotelli Stewart, Crystal Bridges’ chief engagement officer. </p><p>“Right now we have an idea for our large exhibition space of what we’re doing through 2018,” she explains. “We’re green-lighted through 2017 with some yellow lights in late 2017, 2018, and 2019.”</p><p>Crystal Bridges receives a variety of proposals for special exhibitions, which are originally looked over by the curatorial and exhibitions teams to determine what value the exhibition would have for visitors, whether the content is appropriate, and whether the exhibition fits the larger arc of the stories the museum wants to tell with its programs.</p><p>“We’re telling stories about the founding of America,” Stewart says. And since Crystal Bridges is a relatively young museum, it has to consider what its visitors will want to see—such as American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell, which drew thousands of visitors to see 50 original paintings and 323 Saturday Evening Post covers by the artist.</p><p>Once the curators and exhibitions team have decided that an exhibition is a good option for the museum, they start discussing the viability of the exhibition itself—the size of the art, the kind of climate it will need, and the security conditions needed to display it.</p><p>This is when Director of Security Geoff Goodrich is brought into the discussion to review the initial draft of what requirements Crystal Bridges will have to meet in order to host the exhibition. Goodrich analyzes the contract not just to see what the security requirements are, but what the impacts will be on the museum’s facility, how the exhibition will be shipped, and the security requirements necessary, such as the number of physical security officers and cameras in the gallery.</p><p>One of the most important parts of the process is determining how many security officers need to be present in the exhibition gallery based on the layout of the gallery and how the artwork will be presented. For instance, certain exhibitions make visitors want to touch the artwork. These exhibitions might merit more security officers.</p><p>“We have a folk art exhibition coming up later this year, and it’s a very touchy-feely exhibition,” Goodrich says. “It’s folk art from years past and now, so for some people it’s like going to a giant craft show. And when they go to a craft show, they get to touch everything. But this is antique stuff…and whether it’s something handmade or a quilt hanging on a wall, people want to have that sense of touching.”</p><p>This means he’ll have more staff patrolling in the gallery than he would for another exhibition coming to Crystal Bridges that features photography and video. </p><p>Additionally, Goodrich will consider what level of explanation an exhibition might require. Security staff are often the most visible museum staff, so visitors may look to them to explain portions of an exhibition.</p><p>“Knowing that early on allows me to plan my staffing, if I need to hire some additional staff members or shift people around—it gives us a plan to be able to get in on a budget process a year early,” he explains.</p><p>After Goodrich has an idea of how many security officers will need to be on staff for the exhibition, the exhibits designer and curatorial department begin planning how to display the artwork itself.</p><p>They come up with an initial plan and then sit down with Goodrich to look at the proposed layout of the exhibition to identify any issues, such as safety from the fire marshal’s standpoint. “As we all know, 90 percent of the time there’s always something,” Goodrich says. </p><p>To help mitigate this problem, Crystal Bridges has made a collaborative effort to work with the local fire department to bring in the fire marshal for regular walk-throughs throughout the planning process.</p><p>“Not just to make sure it’s up to code, but also to decide this is a smart thing to do,” Goodrich says. “Even though it does meet code, is it smart? Is this the wise way to do this?”</p><p>Sometimes this results in great advice from the fire marshal on small changes that can be made to ensure that the exhibition is displaying the art in a secure manner that also creates a safe environment for visitors.</p><p>For instance, the fire marshal may walk through the exhibition space with Goodrich and other facilities staff and recommend adding another exit to the layout. The additional exit may not be necessary for the space to be code compliant, but would provide easier access out of the exhibition space in the event of an emergency.</p><p>During this process, Goodrich also looks at the layout of the exhibition gallery to determine “pinch-point areas,” where a group of people might gather in front of one painting and create a bottleneck for people to go around. </p><p>If this is the case, and it will interrupt the traffic flow of the gallery, Goodrich can work with the exhibition team to change the layout to reduce congestion—keeping the art safe while also improving visitors’ experience.</p><p>After determining the design of the exhibition—from the wall placement to the entrance and exit—Crystal Bridges then looks at how to place security cameras throughout the gallery and how lighting will impact those cameras. The museum just upgraded the cameras in its special exhibition space so they are all digital and have infrared capabilities. </p><p>“Which means they can see in the dark so we can do lower light levels and still have excellent video quality,” Goodrich says.  </p><p>At this point, the planning phase is complete and Crystal Bridges just has to wait for the exhibition itself to arrive—one of the most difficult aspects of the process.</p><p>“It’s hard to get everything here, easily, because of where we’re located,” Goodrich explains, as the museum sits in the bottom of an Ozark ravine in a relatively rural area. “So most things come to us over land.”​</p><h4>Transporting</h4><p>In the Goya theft case, the truck drivers transporting the painting parked their truck and left it unattended, overnight, in the parking lot. For many security professionals, that scenario is unimaginable if not panic-inducing. </p><p>Fortunately, not all art handlers operate that way. Instead, many require that art shipments be monitored from pick-up to drop-off without overnight stops in between. One company that provides this service in the United States and Canada is FedEx Custom Critical, a freight carrier under the FedEx umbrella.</p><p>As part of Custom Critical, FedEx has a White Glove Services Department that “handles anything that is special care,” says Carl Kiser, operations manager for the department. </p><p>The department has an internal staff that handles customer service and makes the arrangements for pick-up and delivery of art work for clients.</p><p>The drivers, however, are contracted out and must pass a background check before being hired for the department. Drivers pick up shipments, transport them to their destination, and drop them off. They do not, however, pack or unpack artwork.</p><p>As part of this contract service, clients can request certain requirements through White Glove Services, including temperature controlled trucks and single shipment on a single truck.</p><p>That “in and of itself is a security measure because there are no unnecessary stops along the route,” Kiser says. “The freight goes from the point of origin straight through to delivery, if that’s what the art customer wants.”</p><p>Drivers—who often operate in teams for art shipments—are also required to monitor the freight at all times so the truck is never left unattended. “That’s critical in making sure that nothing happens to that shipment,” Kiser says.</p><p>As an added layer of security, when a driver is contracted to pick up a shipment, the department sends the museum or client a Positive Driver Identification (PDI). The PDI contains photos of the drivers that are approved to pick up the shipment, ensuring that the driver who shows up to pick up the shipment is not an imposter.</p><p>The teams of drivers work together, trading off driving duties while one sleeps in the cab of the truck on what are typically long drives across the United States or into Canada. The department will also work with clients who want to send a courier or an escort vehicle with the shipment—a common practice in the art world.</p><p>If drivers need to stop, or there’s a delay in when a museum can unload a shipment, they have the option to use one of FedEx’s freight locations to secure the truck overnight in a gated, locked facility. </p><p>To ensure that trucks are traveling on the approved route and on schedule, the White Glove Services Department monitors the progress of trucks once a shipment is picked up by using a GPS tracking system. </p><p>“We have the system set up to send back a service failure notification if the truck is running more than 15 minutes behind the allotted schedule,” Kiser says. “And then our agents would investigate to find out what’s going on, and then notify the customers so they’re aware of the status of that load throughout the entire shipment.”</p><p>If there are no service failures en route, the department would notify the customer when the shipment arrived at its destination, had been signed for, and delivered. </p><p>However, if there is a problem, the department has Qualcomm wireless communication devices in each of its trucks, which use a satellite connection to send messages back and forth to the truck from the department’s headquarters.</p><p>“So if there is a scenario that occurs, we have tracking on that truck and we also have the ability for the contractor or driver to reach out to us to let us know that something’s taken place,” Kiser says. “Or they call us directly. </p><p>We are a 24/7 facility that can respond to a situation at any time of the day <span style="line-height:1.5em;">or night.”</span></p><p>These situations can include anything from a traffic jam to a storm that could be slowing or stopping the truck altogether. If it’s an emergency situation, such as a truck getting into an accident, the department has escalation procedures in place to alert Kiser and FedEx’s security group to respond. It can also alert the authorities if a law enforcement response is necessary.</p><p>For especially sensitive shipments, the department also offers a device, called SenseAware, that can be placed inside the shipment itself to provide tracking information directly to <span style="line-height:1.5em;">the client. ​</span></p><h4>Exhibiting</h4><p>Once Crystal Bridges knows the arrival date for an exhibition, its exterior security team will assist with the delivery—via truck—entering its receiving area, which is designed to allow a 52-foot truck with a cab to enter and then be sealed off with a gate.</p><p>“That way we have a secure area for them to offload the art,” Goodrich says. “Once the truck is here, then we have a process in place where our receiving clerk will shut down the whole dock area.”</p><p>The clerk will send out an e-mail and a radio alert that the receiving dock area is closed, except to essential personnel who are involved in offloading the truck. Signage is posted in the museum’s elevators so staff are aware of the closure, and only approved personnel using access cards will be allowed into the receiving area.</p><p> Based on the contract with the lending institution, additional security measures might also be required once the exhibition reaches Crystal Bridges, such as having security officers present in the gallery while the artwork is being installed. </p><p>However, with the improvement of access control capabilities at museums, many lending institutions are not requiring this, Goodrich says. </p><p>“Only those people who are directly related to the exhibit can enter, and they only enter through one designated door to get into the gallery space to work,” he explains. “So that limits the need to have a physical body there.”</p><p>Goodrich also places temporary cameras in the gallery while exhibitions are being installed in case a worker is injured while installation is taking place. “If somebody gets hurt, we still have video of the activity in the space for our records,” he says.”</p><p>While installation is taking place, Stewart works with Goodrich to educate security staff about the exhibition so they can answer questions and engage with visitors. Stewart will meet with security staff on a Wednesday when Goodrich has created a standard time for different departments to come in and brief the security team on what they’re doing. </p><p>For her brief, Stewart provides security staff with a program of what exhibitions are coming up and printouts of information about the exhibition, such as what pieces of art will be included and who the artists are.</p><p>After the exhibition opens, Stewart goes back for another Wednesday briefing to discuss what security staff are seeing in the gallery—how people are moving through the gallery, what kinds of questions staff are being asked, and what behaviors they’re seeing.</p><p>For instance, when the Rockwell exhibition was at Crystal Bridges, 120,000 people came through the museum to see it. Managing the crowds became a major challenge, and security staff had to work closely with the exhibitions team to manage the flow of people to prevent overcrowding in the gallery.</p><p>Another challenge came with Crystal Bridges’ State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now exhibition, which featured 102 different artists from across the country and took over the entire footprint of the museum. </p><p>“We had art on the pond, art in the stairwells, art in the hallways, so it was very engaging and textured,” Stewart says. “Everyone wanted to touch the art, but that wasn’t allowed, so it created an operational challenge for staff.”</p><p>Crystal Bridges met this challenge by deploying more security staff to the galleries, so they could engage with visitors, answer questions, and enforce the no-touching rule. </p><p>“We really had to be ready for lots and lots of questions from visitors, and our security team was energized rather than annoyed by that,” Stewart adds.</p><p>With 35 special exhibitions under its belt and more slated for the rest of 2016, Crystal Bridges is now sending its own special exhibition to other institutions. State of the Art made its first stop at the Minneapolis Institute of Art in February and will stay there until the end of this month, when it will travel to Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia.</p><p>And the trucks transporting it won’t be making any unattended overnight stops along the way.  </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465