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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-September-2016.aspxIndustry News September 2016GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652016-09-01T04:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/flora-szatkowski.aspx, Flora Szatkowski<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">Hongqiao Airport in Shanghai, China, experienced rapid growth over the past few years to become the fourth-busiest airport in China, handling more than 30 million passengers each year. Part of the Hongqiao Transportation Hub, which integrates air, rail, subway, and bus transportation, the airport is also the country’s fifth-busiest air cargo transit point.</span></p><p>The airport implemented a video management system from Qognify (formerly NICE Security) seven years ago. The video surveillance solutions have helped keep the airport secure, as well as ensuring smooth airport operations. The system monitors and manages more than 1,500 video cameras, collating high-resolution video feeds from the gates, the airport apron, the parking lots, the airfield, and parts of the transportation hub. The central operations center employs the enhanced video technology, including visual parameters optimization and camera-tampering detection.​</p><h4>PARTNERSHIPS AND DEALS</h4><p>March Networks and AMAG Technology integrated the March Networks Command Enterprise video management solution with AMAG’s SymmetryAccess Control system. </p><p>In migrating to IP surveillance, Camp­bell University consulted with Accu-Tech and chose Arteco eMotion software.</p><p>Bittium and Air-Lynx launched a public safety LTE evolved Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Solution, which can deliver large amounts of data even in a congested network environment.</p><p>CNL Software partnered with ATEC Fire and Security to present education sessions at IFSEC International.</p><p>COPsync, Inc., announced that its COPsync911 threat-alert system is deployed at the Archdiocese of Boston Pastoral Care Center in Braintree, Massachusetts. </p><p>Daon and Gulf Bank Kuwait announced a partnership to provide biometric authentication within Gulf Bank Kuwait’s new mobile banking application.</p><p>Fiber SenSys, Inc., partnered with ela-soft GmbH, to integrate Fiber SenSys Fiber Defender sensors with ela-soft’s GEMOS platform.</p><p>Fluidmesh announced two new manufacturers’ reps: Osborn Sales Solutions will cover the Pacific Northwest, and Intelligent Marketing, Inc., will handle the Southeast region.</p><p>Hong Kong Applied Science and Technology Research Institute and Comba Telecom Limited will jointly establish the ASTRI-Comba Joint Research and Development Laboratory to focus on smart city and smart home technologies. </p><p>Soteria Intelligence and iSheriff Inc. announced a joint partnership to integrate Soteria’s platform for social media threat assessment into the iSheriff Complete platform.</p><p>Louroe Electronics signed Gulf Atlantic Marketing Group, Inc., to be its representative in Florida.</p><p> Lumeta Corporation joined the Carbon Black Connect partner program as a Technology Alliance Partner. </p><p>Milestone Systems partnered with Axis Communications and The Consulting Group to create a security solution for Hamilton Family Center in San Francisco, California, a shelter for victims of domestic violence and the homeless.</p><p>Building Protection Systems, Inc., entered into an exclusive master distributor relationship for the United States and Canada for the Naebula Security Fog Generation Machines.  </p><p>Norbain added BioConnect biometric products to its product portfolio.</p><p>NuData Security announced a partnership with the National Anti-Organ­ized Retail Crime Association to work against global organized retail crime.</p><p>OSS Inc. is providing security guard services for the LORD Corporation.</p><p>Qognify (formerly NICE Security) integrated Vanderbilt’s SPC Intrusion Detection system with its Situator situation management solution.</p><p>RockDove Solutions announced that Fluidmaster is using its crisis management solution, In Case of Crisis, for business continuity and emergency response plans.</p><p>Sielox LLC partnered with three new organizations to serve as manufacturers’ representatives. KLM Marketing will represent the company in the Mid-Atlantic, Thomasson Marketing Group in the West, and Pinnacle Marketing in the South Central United States.</p><p>Thales announced that its payShield 9000 hardware security modules are being used by Swiftch to help secure its self-certified mobile card payment acceptance solution throughout the United Arab Emirates.</p><p>The Threat Alliance Program launched by ThreatQuotient is creating new partnerships with companies, such as Riversafe, Guidepoint, and HelpAG.</p><p>Tyco Security Products announced that Millworks Custom Manufacturing in Toronto, Canada, installed a security solution using DSC PowerSeries Neo to integrate a wireless intrusion system throughout its facility.</p><p>Veridocs was named a Key Account by 3M, giving it access to additional 3M product lines.</p><p>Vicon Industries, Inc., is partnering with two new manufacturers’ representative firms: E-Connect in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee; and Coaxial Systems Associates for Florida and the Caribbean.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>Boon Edam Inc. provided Turnlock 100 full-height turnstiles for APM Terminals Callao as part of a physical security upgrade at the Multipurpose North Terminal of the Port of Callao in Peru.</p><p>Public Safety Canada and the Canadian Red Cross signed a memorandum of understanding for information sharing, personnel exchanges, research, and more.</p><p>Colbert Police Department in Oklahoma joined the COPsync communication and information sharing network.</p><p>CYREN was awarded a grant by the Office of the Chief Scientist at the Israel Ministry of Economy and Industry as part of an ongoing initiative that encourages the development of technological solutions in cybersecurity.</p><p>CyberPoint International, LLC, was awarded a contract by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Borders and Maritime Security Division to participate in the Container Security Device Technology Demonstration for the US/EU Global Supply Chain Pilot Project. </p><p>The U.S. Navy awarded a contract to General Dynamics Mission Systems to build and deliver digital modular radios for new Navy surface vessels and submarines.</p><p> MorphoTrak and SNAP, Inc., will provide LiveScan Jumpkits to the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol for biometric acquisition in austere environments.</p><p>Siemens implemented an integrated physical security solution throughout Port Manatee, which is located at the entrance to Tampa Bay.</p><p>DirectView Holdings, Inc., teamed with TACLENS, LLC, to deploy its DVX1 body-worn cameras to the Hawk Cove Police Department in Texas.</p><p>TASER International and its Canadian subsidiary, Axon Public Safety Canada Inc., announced that Service de Police de la Ville de Montréal is using Axon body-worn cameras and the digital evidence management solution Evidence.com.  </p><p>The University of North Georgia recently earned designation as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency. </p><p>Utility, Inc., announced that the Biloxi, Mississippi Police Department has officially approved the deployment of BodyWorn body cameras and Rocket in-vehicle wireless routers for its officers.</p><p>Vigilant Solutions announced that Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department in California is expanding the use of its FaceSearch facial recognition solution.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>Bold Technologies is UL 827 listed for its Manitou Cloud Services Data Center.</p><p>Implant Sciences Corporation was selected by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to receive the 2016 DHS Small Business Achievement Award.</p><p>Iluminar Inc. joined the Arecont Vision Alliance Program, and all of its LED illumination products are Arecont Vision MegaLab certified.</p><p>International SOS achieved certification to ISO/IEC 27001:2013 for Information Security Management.</p><p>ISONAS Inc. honored WESCO International, Inc., with its 2015 Distributor of The Year Award.</p><p>Nationwide Building Society has been awarded the Retail Banking Security Innovation of the Year award for a behavioral biometrics prototype it developed with Unisys Corporation and BehavioSec to improve security and user experience for mobile banking customers. </p><p>NextLabs was granted three additional patents for enhancing capabilities of the policy-based authorization platform to make information sharing more secure.</p><p>ObserveIT was named an IDC Innovator in the behavioral analytics and identity awareness market by International Data Corporation.</p><p>PSA Security Network gave the Superstar Award, its highest vendor honor, to two companies, Altronix and Windy City Wire. Other vendors winning a variety of awards from PSA included Allegion, AMAG Technology, Arecont Vision, Bosch Security Systems, Exacq Technologies, March Networks, Milestone, Hanwha Techwin America, Seneca, Salient Systems, HID, CSC, LifeSafety Power, and OpenEye.</p><p>The Qvarn Platform for managing digital identities was awarded the prize for Best Approach on Improving Governance and Mitigating Risks at the European Identity & Cloud Awards 2016, organized by KuppingerCole.</p><p>Sielox LLC named System Solutions of Afton, Minnesota, as its 2015 Rep of the Year.</p><p>Telco Systems won a Cybersecurity Excellence Award in the category for SDN/NFV Security in a program sponsored by the Information Security Community on LinkedIn.</p><p>Thales announced that its nShield hardware security modules received Common Criteria Evaluation Assurance Level 4+ certification.​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>Agenda Screening Services teamed with local businesses, police, and Hull University Business School to form the Humber Business Resilience Forum to explore cybersecurity issues.</p><p>Ankura Consulting Group launched its Risk Advisory and Management practice, focusing on critical infrastructure and cybersecurity.</p><p>Champion Group of Companies created a new corporate website at www.championalarms.com.  </p><p>Educational videos on critical cybersecurity topics relevant to any organization have been produced by a group of security experts and leading members of CompTIA. </p><p>Courion changed its name to Core Security to reflect the company’s strategic vision following the recent acquisitions of Core Security and SecureReset.  </p><p>Elite Investigations Ltd., a New York–based national security guard services provider, is expanding into the Virginia market.</p><p>FLIR announced a free radiation guidebook to provide tips for evaluating and investing in the right tool for a deployment program: 10 Things to Consider Before Buying a Handheld or Belt-Worn Radiation Detector.</p><p>G4S security teams in Alberta, Canada, provided assistance to evacuees displaced during a wildfire in the region.</p><p>Honeywell expanded cellular coverage for its LYNX 5210 and LYNX 7000 self-contained control panels, giving security dealers more options to expand their businesses in alternative cellular coverage areas. </p><p>ICSA Labs, an independent division of Verizon, is rolling out a new security testing program to provide assurance testing for Internet of Things devices and sensors. </p><p>Ilitch Charities and the Detroit Tigers Foundation partnered to donate three Vapor Wake explosives detection canines to local law enforcement agencies, including the Michigan State Police, Wayne State University Public Safety Department, and the Detroit Police Department. </p><p>ISONAS Inc. launched a new webinar series aimed at educating participants on access control and its ISONAS Pure IP solution.</p><p>Kathrein acquired noFilis, allowing the company to offer RFID hardware and software expertise from a single source.</p><p>Mercury Systems, Inc., completed the acquisition of the embedded security, RF and microwave, and custom microelectronics businesses from Micro­semi Corporation.</p><p>ONVIF created a new internal working group to monitor the physical security market. The Use Case Working Group will help shape ONVIF specifications, develop future profiles, and maintain ONVIF’s technical roadmap.</p><p>Personal.com is exiting its consumer business to focus on workplace productivity, collaboration, and security. The company’s products will now be called TeamData, but it will retain the Personal, Inc. corporate name.</p><p>Proficio opened a new headquarters and security operations center in Singapore.</p><p>Sharp Electronics Corporation, founding sponsor of the Robolliance program, announced the launch of an initiative focused on ground-based security robotics. </p><p>SANS Institute will participate in the White House Joining Forces Initiative, pledging to train at least 200 transitioning veterans over the next four years through its VetSuccess program.</p><p>Vivid Learning Systems launched a free, online training experience for active shooter response.</p><p>VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. developed an economic evaluation procedure, RESEC, to enable authorities, urban security planners, and risk management professionals to evaluate the costs and benefits of security solutions for urban environments.</p>

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Virtual-Lineup.aspxThe Virtual Lineup<p>​U.S. State and federal agencies are amassing databases of American citizens’ fingerprints and images. The programs were largely under the public radar until a governmental watchdog organization conducted an audit on them. The so-called “virtual lineups” include two FBI programs that use facial recognition technology to search a database containing 64 million images and fingerprints.</p><p>In May 2016, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) released Face Recognition Technology: FBI Should Better Ensure Privacy and Accuracy, a report on the FBI programs. Since 1999, the FBI has been using the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS), which digitized the fingerprints of arrestees. In 2010, a $1.2 billion project began that would replace IAFIS with Next Generation Identification (NGI), a program that would include both fingerprint data and facial recognition technology using the Interstate Photo System (IPS). The FBI began a pilot version of the NGI-IPS program in 2011, and it became fully operational in April 2015. </p><p>The NGI-IPS draws most of its photos from some 18,000 federal, state, and local law enforcement entities, and consists of two categories: criminal and civil identities. More than 80 percent of the photos are criminal—obtained during an arrest—while the rest are civil and include photos from driver’s licenses, security clearances, and other photo-based civil applications. The FBI, which is the only agency able to directly access the NGI-IPS, can use facial recognition technology to support active criminal investigations by searching the database and finding potential matches to the image of a suspected criminal. </p><p>Diana Maurer, the director of justice and law enforcement issues on the homeland security and justice team at GAO, explains to Security Management that the FBI can conduct a search for an active investigation based on images from a variety of sources—camera footage of a bank robber, for example. Officials input the image to the NGI-IPS, and the facial recognition software will return as many as 50 possible matches. The results are investigative leads, the report notes, and cannot be used to charge an individual with a crime. A year ago, the FBI began to allow seven states—Arkansas, Florida, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Mexico, and Texas—to submit photos to be run through the NGI-IPS. The FBI is working with eight additional states to grant them access, and another 24 states have expressed interest in using the database.</p><p>“The fingerprints and images are all one package of information,” Maurer says. “If you’ve been arrested, you can assume that you’re in, at a minimum, the fingerprint database. You may or may not be in the facial recognition database, because different states have different levels of cooperation with the FBI on the facial images.”</p><p>The FBI has a second, internal investigative tool called Facial Analysis, Comparison, and Evaluation (FACE) Services. The more extensive program runs similar automated searches using NGI-IPS as well as external partners’ face recognition systems that contain primarily civil photos from state and federal government databases, such as driver’s license photos and visa applicant photos. </p><p>“The total number of face photos available in all searchable repositories is over 411 million, and the FBI is interested in adding additional federal and state face recognition systems to their search capabilities,” the GAO report notes.</p><p>Maurer, who authored the GAO report, says researchers found a number of privacy, transparency, and accuracy concerns over the two programs. Under federal privacy laws, agencies must publish a Systems of Records Notice (SORN) or Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) in the Federal Register identifying the categories of individuals whose information is being collected. Maurer notes that the information on such regulations is “typically very wonky and very detailed” and is “not something the general public is likely aware of, but it’s certainly something that people who are active in the privacy and transparency worlds are aware of.” </p><p>GAO found that the FBI did not issue timely or accurate SORNs or PIAs for its two facial recognition programs. In 2008, the FBI published a PIA of its plans for NGI-IPS but didn’t update the assessment after the program underwent significant changes during the pilot phase—including the significant addition of facial recognition services. Additionally, the FBI did not release a PIA for FACE Services until May 2015—three years after the program began. </p><p>“We were very concerned that the Department of Justice didn’t issue the required SORN or PIA until after FBI started using the facial recognition technology for real world work,” Maurer notes. </p><p>Maurer says the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)—which oversees the FBI—disagreed with the GAO’s concerns over the notifications. Officials say the programs didn’t need PIAs until they became fully operational, but the GAO report noted that the FBI conducted more than 20,000 investigative searches during the three-year pilot phase of the NGI-IPS program. </p><p>“The DOJ felt the earlier version of the PIA was sufficient, but we said it didn’t mention facial recognition technology at all,” Maurer notes. </p><p>Similarly, the DOJ did not publish a SORN that addressed the collection of citizens’ photos for facial recognition capabilities until GAO completed its review. Even though the facial recognition component of NGI-IPS has been in use since 2011, the DOJ said the existing version of the SORN—the 1999 version that addressed only legacy fingerprint collection activities—was sufficient. </p><p>“Throughout this period, the agency collected and maintained personal information for these capabilities without the required explanation of what information it is collecting or how it is used,” the GAO report states.</p><p>It wasn’t until May 2016—after the DOJ received the GAO draft report—that an updated SORN was published, Maurer notes. “So they did it very late in the game, and the bottom line for both programs is the same: they did not issue the SORNs until after both of those systems were being used for real world investigations,” Maurer explains. </p><p>In the United States, there are no federally mandated repercussions for skirting privacy laws, Maurer says. “The penalty that they will continue to pay is public transparency and scrutiny. The public has very legitimate questions about DOJ and FBI’s commitment to protecting the privacy of people in their use of facial recognition technology.”</p><p>Another concern the GAO identified is the lack of oversight or audits for using facial recognition services in active investigations. The FBI has not completed an audit on the effectiveness of the NGI-IPS because it says the program has not been fully operational long enough. As with the PIA and SORN disagreements, the FBI says the NGI-IPS has only been fully operational since it completed pilot testing in April 2015, while the GAO notes that parts of the system have been used in investigations since the pilot program began in 2011. </p><p>The FBI faces a different problem when it comes to auditing its FACE Services databases. Since FACE Services uses up to 18 different databases, the FBI does not have the primary authority or obligation to audit the external databases—the responsibility lies with the owners of the databases, DOJ officials stated. “We understand the FBI may not have authority to audit the maintenance or operation of databases owned and managed by other agencies,” the report notes. “However, the FBI does have a responsibility to oversee the use of the information by its employees.” </p><p>Audits and operational testing on the face recognition technology are all the more important because the FBI has conducted limited assessments on the accuracy of the searches, Maurer notes. FBI requires the NGI-IPS to return a correct match of an existing person at least 85 percent of the time, which was met during initial testing. However, Maurer points out that this detection rate was based on a list of 50 photos returned by the system, when sometimes investigators may request fewer results. Additionally, the FBI’s testing database contained 926,000 photos, while NGI-IPS contains about 30 million photos.</p><p>“Although the FBI has tested the detection rate for a candidate list of 50 photos, NGI-IPS users are able to request smaller candidate lists—specifically between two and 50 photos,” the report states. “FBI officials stated that they do not know, and have not tested, the detection rate for other candidate list sizes.” </p><p>Maurer notes that the GAO recommendation to conduct more extensive operational tests for accuracy in real-world situations was the only recommendation the FBI agreed with fully. “It’s a start,” she says. </p><p>The FBI also has not tested the false positive rate—how often NGI-IPS searches erroneously match a person to the database. Because the results are not intended to serve as positive identifications, just investigative leads, the false positive rates are not relevant, FBI officials stated.</p><p>“There was one thing they seemed to miss,” Maurer says. “The FBI kept saying, ‘if it’s a false positive, what’s the harm? We’re just investigating someone, they’re cleared right away.’ From our perspective, the FBI shows up at your home or place of business, thinks you’re a terrorist or a bank robber, that could have a really significant impact on people’s lives, and that’s why it’s important to make sure this is accurate.”</p><p>The GAO report notes that the collection of Americans’ biometric information combined with facial recognition technology will continue to grow both at the federal investigative level as well as in state and local police departments.</p><p>“Even though we definitely had some concerns about the accuracy of these systems and the protections they have in place to ensure the privacy of the individuals who are included in these searches, we do recognize that this is an important tool for law enforcement in helping solve cases,” Maurer says. “We just want to make sure it’s done in a way that protects people’s privacy, and that these searches are done accurately.”</p><p>This type of technology isn’t just limited to law enforcement, according to Bloomberg’s Hello World video series. A new Russian app, FindFace, by NTechLab allows its users to photograph anyone they come across and learn their identity. Like the FBI databases, the app uses facial recognition technology to search a popular Russian social network and other public sources with a 70 percent accuracy rate—the creators of the app boast a database with 1 billion photographs. Moscow officials are currently working with FindFace to integrate the city’s 150,000 surveillance cameras into the existing database to help solve criminal investigations. But privacy advocates are raising concerns about other ways the technology could be used. For example, a user could learn the identity of a stranger on the street and later contact that person. 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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Road-to-Resilience.aspxThe Road to Resilience<p>Of course, 100RC had neither the resources nor staff to partner with 10,000 cities. But organization leaders argued that its 100 member cities could be models for institutionalizing resilience—that is, embedding resilience thinking into all the decisions city leaders make on a day-to-day basis, so that resilience is mainstreamed into the city government's policies and practices. Other cities could then adapt the model to fit their own parameters, and institutionalized resilience would spread throughout the world. </p><p>Toward this aim, 100RC recently released a report that discusses three case studies of institutionalizing resilience in New Orleans, Louisiana; Melbourne, Australia; and Semarang, Indonesia. </p><p>For all cities that 100RC works with, the organization provides funding to hire a new executive, the chief resilience officer (CRO). The group also advocates that member cities take the "10% Resilience Pledge," under which 10 percent of the city's annual budget goes toward resilience-building goals and projects. So far, nearly 30 member cities have taken the pledge, which has focused more than $5 billion toward resilience projects.</p><p>Of the three case study cities, New Orleans may be most known as a jurisdiction that has had to recover from repeated recent disasters, including Hurricanes Katrina and Isaac and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Given these experiences, New Orleans was one of the first cities to release a holistic resilience strategy, which connected resilience practices to almost all sectors of the city, including equity, energy, education, and emergency planning.</p><p>The strategy, Resilient New Orleans, has three underlying goals: strengthen the city's infrastructure, embrace the changing environment instead of resisting it, and create equal opportunities for all residents. </p><p>To better implement the strategy, New Orleans CRO Jeff Hebert was promoted to the level of first deputy mayor, and departments were joined to unite resilience planning with key sectors like water management, energy, transportation, coastal protection, and climate change.</p><p>Once this reconfiguration was complete, the city took several actions. It created the Gentilly Resilience District, which is aimed at reducing flood risk, slowing land subsidence, and encouraging neighborhood revitalization. The resilience district combines various approaches to water and land management to move forward on projects that will make the area more resilient. The city will also train some underemployed residents to work on the projects. </p><p>In addition, New Orleans leaders are developing and implementing new resilience design standards for public works and infrastructure, so that efforts to improve management of storm water and multi-modal transit systems will be included as standard design components.</p><p>Melbourne has its own challenges. Situated on the boundary of a hot inland area and a cool Southern Ocean, it can be subject to severe weather, such as gales, thunderstorms and hail, and large temperature drops. Governmentally, it is a "city of cities" made up of 32 local councils from around the region, so critical issues such as transportation, energy, and water systems are managed by various bodies, complicating decision making.</p><p>City leaders created the Resilient Melbourne Delivery Office, which will be hosted by the City of Melbourne for five years, jointly funded by both local and state governments. The office—an interdisciplinary team of at least 12 people, led by the CRO Toby Kent—is responsible for overseeing the delivery of the resilience strategy.</p><p>The strategy has four main goals: empower communities to take active responsibility for their own well-being; create sustainable infrastructure that will also promote social cohesion; provide diverse local employment opportunities to support an adaptable workforce; and ensure support for strong natural assets.</p><p>For Semarang, a coastal city in an archipelago, water is the main focus of sustainability. Factors like a rise in sea levels and coastal erosion have increased the negative impact of floods.</p><p>These impacts can challenge the city in many ways. Thus, for its resilience strategy, Semarang leaders focused on building capacities, including more economic opportunity, disaster risk management, integrated mobility, and sustainable water strategies.</p><p>In Indonesia, like many other Asian countries, the national government sets the goals and parameters for much of the development that takes place at the local level. Thus, Semarang leaders worked with members of the Indonesian Parliament to educate them on the city's existing resilience strategy, and to integrate the city's findings and insights into Indonesia's National Development Plan.</p><p>These coordination efforts bore fruit in the establishment of projects like a bus rapid transit system, which had strong support from the national government. The system has already been implemented in several main corridors and will be expanded. It is expected to offer insight and experience in cross-boundary resilience-related travel.</p><p>As 100RC cities look to institutionalize resiliency, the organization is also helping members improve their emergency management programs. The group is partnering with the Intermedix Corporation, which will help some member cities assess their current emergency management programs, and develop a blueprint for addressing gaps in the program and meeting resiliency goals.</p><p>"As new and complex problems and challenges arise, it's becoming more and more important for cities to look outside of their own organizations for the expertise and solutions required to meet and overcome these challenges," says Michael Berkowitz, president of 100RC. ​​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Security-Culture.aspxBook Review: Security Culture<p>​Routledge; Routledge.com; 232 pages; $119.95.</p><p>Building and maintaining a strong security culture is integral to any organization’s security and resiliency. <em>In Security Culture: A How-to Guide for Improving Security Culture and Dealing with People Risk in Your Organisation</em>, author Hilary Walton demonstrates how to establish a “culture within a culture” where security is everyone’s priority and part of their day-to-day professional life. </p><p> This is a book about assessing, implementing, and improving upon a security and risk management culture within an organization. The author successfully outlines the fundamentals of a comprehensive, pragmatic security culture campaign, citing her experience as an organizational psychologist and business consultant in the United Kingdom and Australasia. Six case studies of her suggestions in action add credibility, and three appendixes offer useful examples of proposal letters and a year-long security communications plan.</p><p> Though many of her suggestions focus on large enterprises, her recommendations are scalable for smaller ones. While most of the book focuses on cybersecurity issues, an experienced security manager will see applications for integrating the entire security operation, as well. </p><p> This book is appropriate for a wide range of practitioners, instructors, and consultants who want to establish and build upon a strong security culture within their organizations. </p><p>--<br></p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Erik Antons CPP, PSP</strong>, is manager of international security and executive services for Sempra Energy and is a former special agent with the Diplomatic Security Service, U.S. Department of State. He is a member of the ASIS International Global Terrorism, Political Instability and International Crime Council and a board member for the ASIS San Diego Chapter.       </em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465