Security by Industry

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/April-2017-Product-Showcase.aspxApril 2017 Product ShowcaseGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-04-01T04:00:00ZSM Staff<p></p><p><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Everbridge%20Rd3%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;" /></p><h4>EMPLOYEE SAFETY</h4><p>Employers that have a mobile workforce, distributed teams, or large campuses may have difficulty tracking employees' locations, schedules, and travel in case of location-based critical incidents. Everbridge of Burlington, Massachusetts, introduced the Everbridge Safety Connection to help businesses and organizations quickly locate and communicate with their people. The solution aggregates geo-location data from multiple systems so that administrators can reach out to those who are potentially at risk, including employees, contractors, and visitors. Booth 3040, Circle 422.</p><p> </p><h4>MOBILE ACCESS<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/DSX%20rd3%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:72px;" /></h4><p>DSX Mobile Command from Dallas-based DSX Access Systems, Inc., brings the power of the DSX workstation program to the convenience of a smartphone. The mobile command feature allows the activation of custom predefined commands, locking and unlocking of doors, control of alarm points, and monitoring of system events from a mobile but secure application. Apple- and Android-compatible, it enables global functions such as building and campus lockdown, incident response reconfiguration, and more. Repetitive chores like momentarily unlocking a door or granting access to a gate can be programmed into command buttons for easy activation. Booth 7103, Circle 423.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Hikvision%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:282px;" />VIDEO MANAGEMENT</h4><p>The Blazer Express from Hikvision of Zhejiang, China, is an intelligent video management station that manages Hikvision IP cameras with three primary functions. It's a Windows-based NVR with a solid-state-drive operating system. It accommodates 16 or 32 cameras with 16 built-in PoE inputs for IP cameras, and up to 24 terabytes of onboard storage. The Blazer Express manages live video and playback from up to 15 remote NVRs. It offers powerful video analytic searches and point-of-sale integration. Booth 18037, Circle 424.</p><p> </p><h4>INTEGRATED SECURITY<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/G4S%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:138px;" /></h4><p>G4S Secure Solutions of Jupiter, Florida, has a 100-year legacy of innovation in the security business. New processes assess and thwart security risks, while new technologies help security personnel execute their jobs more efficiently. Integrated Security Solutions address today's security challenges in four steps: ASSESS and evaluate risks; EQUIP personnel with technology for efficient and effective protection; INTEGRATE solutions with the customer's company, technology, and environment; and STAFF the solution with the correct trained personnel in the right roles and numbers. Booth 10053, Circle 425.</p><p> </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/SDC%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:265px;" />DOOR OPERATOR</h4><div><p>The Auto EntryControl Swinging Door Operator from Security Door Controls of Camarillo, California, provides hands-free, low-power, point-of-entry door control to help meet ADA requirements for door installations in storefronts, office buildings, campuses, and healthcare facilities. With its safe and reliable electro-mechanical drive and slim-line design, the microprocessor-based unit is self-tuning and self-learning. It offers non-handed operation, full mechanical stops, and a variety of interface options for sensors, push-plates, fire alarms, and electrified locks. It meets the ANSI standard for compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Booth 21109, Circle 426.</p><p>​ </p><h4>PORTABLE DETECTOR<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Garrett%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:74px;" /></h4><p>The Walkthrough Caster Set from Garrett Metal Detectors of Garland, Texas, is ideal for stadiums, special events, and school use. The casters, which can be permanently attached, allow full mobility of a Garrett PD 6500i walkthrough metal detector by one person. Detectors can be moved to a secure location when they are not in use and provide an unimpeded exit at the close of an event. The caster assembly is constructed of durable, powder-coated steel for use in all types of environmental conditions. Booth 16127, Circle 427.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Axis%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:139px;" />DOME CAMERA</h4><p>The AXIS Q6155-E PTZ Dome Network Camera from Axis  Communications of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, is a pan-tilt-zoom model with laser focus, offering much faster and more accurate autofocus even in the most challenging lighting conditions. The new laser focus technology combined with high image quality allows people and objects to be identified quickly and precisely. The camera offers HDTV 1080p resolution and 30x optical zoom. The camera also has Axis' Zipstream technology, which lowers bandwidth and storage requirements while keeping necessary forensic details. Booth 14051, Circle 428.</p><p>​ </p><h4>COUNTERSURVEILLANCE<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/REI%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:90px;" /></h4><p>Research Electronics International (REI) of Algood, Tennessee, introduced the ANDRE Near-field Detection Receiver, a handheld broadband receiver that detects known, unknown, illegal, disruptive, or interfering transmissions. The ANDRE locates nearby RF, infrared, visible light, carrier current, and other types of transmitters. The ANDRE Advanced Kit includes a wide range of accessories specifically designed to receive transmissions across a 1 kHz to 6 GHz frequency range. It presents signal responses on a touchscreen display in the form of a histogram that shows signal strength over time. The device's frequency counter generates an automatic signal list and detailed frequency band classification. Audio mode accesses analog audio demodulation, playback, and recording. Booth 19124, Circle 429.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/VUE%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:165px;" />SECURE STORAGE</h4><p>The VUE Locker from Chicago-based LossPreventionSolution.com features an open mesh design and a welded-on hardened steel hasp that resists cutting and hammering, keeping items safe and untouched. The welded construction of expanded metal and the heavy-duty, powder-coated finish hold up in the harshest industrial settings. The company's aesthetically pleasing, custom-designed solutions allow quick visual inspection of stored goods, ventilation, and peace of mind. Booth 22150, Circle 430.</p><p>​ </p><h4>SECURITY MANAGEMENT<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/AMAG%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:145px;" /></h4><p>AMAG Technology, Inc., of Torrance, California, offers a security solution that manages access control, video surveillance, intrusion detection, identity management, visitor management, and incident management. Powered by a robust, policy-based platform, it helps security managers reduce risk, reduce cost, and maintain compliance. The Symmetry Security Management System provides intelligent networked solutions scaled to manage security challenges from small, remote facilities to multinational organizations around the world. Booth 11053, Circle 431.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Cognitec%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:143px;" />VIDEO SEARCH</h4><p>FaceVACS-VideoScan video screening and analytics technology from Cognitec Systems Corporation of Dresden, Germany, now allows users to perform complex searches on persons appearing in camera streams and stored media files. Users can upload videos recorded at a specific location and time to track possible participants in a crime. They can find a person enrolled in an image database or search for an unknown person and locate their appearances in multiple videos. Person searches can be filtered by age ranges, gender, ethnicity, and glasses. A special IP video camera with built-in face detection and tracking technology is a component of the system. Booth 17127, Circle 432.</p><p> </p><h4>GLOBAL INTELLIGENCE<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/NC4%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:209px;" /></h4><p>NC4 Risk Center provides security professionals with timely, comprehensive global threat and incident information about physical hazards that may have an adverse effect on physical security, personnel, supply chains, and other mission critical infrastructure within the organization. NC4 of El Segundo, California, has a dedicated team of skilled analysts working to create situational awareness by monitoring, gathering, analyzing, reporting, escalating, and responding to incidents and events that threaten an organization's resilience. NC4 Risk Center aggregates and integrates information from public and private sources to bring users a highly configurable presentation of relevant information for operational risk management. Booth 33096, Circle 433.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Gaitronics%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:83px;" />RUGGED PHONES</h4><p>GAI-Tronics of Mohnton, Pennsylvania, announced a new line of Behavioral Health Telephones, which meet the stringent standards set forth by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Design Guide for the Built Environment of Behavioral Health Facilities. Designed with the safety of both staff and tenants in mind, the phones come in a variety of styles. They feature stainless steel construction and an armored 12-inch cord for handset models. They can be mounted in robust surface mount enclosures. The phones are available in both analog and VoIP configurations and some models can be used indoors or outdoors. Booth 2037, Circle 434.</p><p>​ </p><h4>TAILGATE DETECTION<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Detex%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:150px;" /></h4><p>Detex Corporation of New Braunfels, Texas, offers dependable panic hardware for restricted secure areas, where unauthorized entry must be controlled and authorized entry must be quick and reliable. The Tailgate Detection System ensures that only one person enters a door for each authorized card read. It is compatible with most access control technologies, is easy to retrofit, and has an integrated door prop alarm for extra security. Booth 19109, Circle 435.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Parkut%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:174px;" />SECURITY BOOTHS</h4><p>Par-Kut International, Inc., of Harrison Township, Michigan, manufactures bullet-resistant security booths for high-security locations. The enclosures meet protective levels UL8, NIJ4, and higher and can be engineered to meet blast load requirements. In addition to HVAC, options include reflective glass, gun ports, anti-fatigue floor mats, dimmable interior lighting, and generators. They can be built on trailers or on top of towers. Bullet-resistant guard booths can have a very basic appearance or incorporate design enhancements to blend with surroundings. Circle 436.</p><p>​ </p><h4>PERSONAL SAFETY<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Verint%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:190px;" /></h4><p>Verint of Melville, New York, introduced the Mobile Reporter phone application, which enables users to immediately alert security to a potential security issue—regardless of their location. The app will send critical updates to the command center in a wide variety of formats, such as a simple SOS alert, text message, detailed report form, photo, and live audio and video. The technology can be leveraged for a wide variety of applications, including executive travel, remote employees, outside contractors, and visitor safety. When alerted, the command center gets a single view of users, their locations, and their current status. The system offers a variety of mechanisms to initiate active or passive tracking of people through their devices and bi-directional communication with the device. Booth 2097, Circle 437.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Quantum%20Secure%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:250px;" />IDENTITY ACCESS</h4><p>The SAFE Sports and Events Access Manager from San Jose–based Quantum Secure—part of HID Global—enables secure and rapid entry to stadiums and other venues, providing security for temporary or limited-engagement events. The mobile app solution removes the need to rely on clipboards and lists to manage contractors, vendors, volunteers, and other nonticketed individuals who need temporary access to a venue. The solution also integrates with IT systems and multiple handheld devices for swift, accurate real-time validation and immediate onboarding and provisioning for a variety of identity types based on access permissions. The solution also records identity access logs to track key operational and security metrics and streamline compliance processes. Booth 11063, Circle 438.</p><p> </p><h4>IP CAMERAS<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Honeywell%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:209px;" /></h4><p>Honeywell of Northford, Connecticut, expanded its Performance Series IP Family to include new, affordable, easy-to-install 1080p and 4MP wide dynamic range IP cameras. The new cameras deliver high-quality video, a superior user experience, easy video integration with other solutions, and improved user account security with enhanced risk reduction, lowering installation, operation, and maintenance costs. The range includes 15 new IP cameras in mini dome, micro dome, ball, and bullet designs. Select cameras include motorized focal zoom technology, which auto-focuses the lens after zooming. Booth 14025, Circle 439.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Comnet%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:181px;" />ETHERNET TRANSPORT</h4><p>ComNet, Communication Networks of Danbury, Connecticut, introduced the ComNet CTS24+2, which offers up to 24 ports of 10/100Mbps Ethernet and two ports of Gigabit uplink using TX or SFP combo ports. Up to three eight-channel modules can be used. These modules are offered in CAT5/6 10/100Mbps Ethernet, optical 100FX SFP, or CopperLine Coax or UTP extending interfaces. Booth 4071, Circle 440.</p><p>​ </p><h4>INTERCOM ACCESS<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Talkaphone%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:234px;" /></h4><p>The Complete IP Door Intercom System from Talkaphone of Niles, Illinois, is a fully integrated access control package with head-end IP video attendant station and two-way IP call station. The VOIP-201C3-SYS package includes the VOIP-201C3 Call Station that connects with the AVM-1 IP video attendant station to provide a one-stop solution. The AVM-1 can monitor and regulate entry points through the call stations using video and voice communications. Easily install it at any access point to intelligently control customer or employee entry or exit. The included VOIP-201C3 surface mounted call station with an ONVIF-compliant wide-angle megapixel IP camera is constructed of IP66-rated, vandal-resistant, marine-grade stainless steel. An additional Ethernet port is provided to support connection to optional Ethernet devices. The call station also allows for remote software upgrades, configuration, and monitoring. Booth 10109, Circle 441.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Avigilon%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:150px;" />VIDEO ANALYTICS</h4><p>Avigilon Appearance Search from Avigilon of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is a sophisticated, deep-learning, artificial intelligence search engine for video data. It easily sorts through hours of footage to quickly locate a specific person of interest across all cameras on an entire site. It can help track a person's route and identify previous and last-known locations to improve incident response time and enhance forensic investigations. Avigilon Appearance Search technology integrates with Avigilon Control Center 6.0 Enterprise edition software, Avigilon cameras with self-learning video analytics, and select NVRs. Booth 22043, Circle 442.</p><p> </p><p>​ </p><h4>SECURITY REVOLVING DOORS<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/DormaKaba%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:204px;" /></h4><p>Facilities requiring controlled access of authorized personnel to sensitive areas can rely on security revolving doors from dormakaba of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The doors combine convenience with performance, providing a practical and secure solution for any interior access point. Doors are designed to harmonize with traditional or modern environments. All models are available in a wide variety of finishes and can be configured to allow essential and safe passage. A sophisticated sensor system in compliance with current safety standards prevents possible injury. Depending on the security requirements, the door may be equipped with a contact mat, scales, or internal monitoring. Booth 8053, Circle 443.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Keyscan%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:201px;" />ACCESS SOFTWARE</h4><p>Keyscan of Whitby, Ontario, Canada, offers Aurora access control management software, which seamlessly integrates with Kaba E-Plex wireless locks to provide a single software platform solution. New features include Microsoft-certified webcam support, plus integrations with video management systems such as Salient Systems, biometric readers from BioConnect and Suprema, and visitor management from EasyLobby. Keyscan networked access control systems are designed for applications in all vertical markets. Booth 8053, Circle 444.</p><p>​ </p><h4>ETHERNET OVER COAX<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Altronix%20Box%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:246px;" /></h4><p>The eBridge800E Managed 8-port EoC Receiver with integral PoE+ switch is the head-end solution for upgrading coax to IP. New from Altronix of Brooklyn, New York, the compact 1U rack unit features two 1GB uplinks, an 8-port PoE+ switch, and CAT-5 to coax media converter. IP devices can be deployed up to 300 meters away, and a built-in battery charger ensures seamless operation. LINQ technology allows users to monitor, control, and report power/diagnostics from anywhere over the network. The unit is made in the United States and has a lifetime warranty. Booth 11073, Circle 445.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Winsted%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:135px;" />CONSOLES</h4><p>Impulse Dual Sit/Stand consoles from Minneapolis-based Winsted Corporation combine ergonomics and operator comfort. Studies show that prolonged sitting can be detrimental to one's health, and that alternating between sitting and standing can increase energy and reduce fatigue. The consoles provide two independently adjustable, ergonomically curved work surfaces. These surfaces can be raised and lowered to meet the needs of individual operators while offering flexibility to sit or stand. Options include electric-lift legs for adjusting the work surface height from 30 to 46 inches at the push of a button, three programmable height settings, and a load capacity of 520 pounds. Booth 14109, Circle 446.</p><p>​ </p><h4>SECURITY MANAGEMENT<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Genetec%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:168px;" /></h4><p>Genetec of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, unveiled the latest version of Security Center, its unified IP security platform. Security Center 5.6 includes an updated HTML5-based Web client, new security hardware integrations to SimonVoss electronic locks and the Mercury Security MS Bridge, and the ability to use license plates as access control credentials with the new AutoVu SharpV camera. As a Mercury Security Platinum-Elite partner, Genetec now officially supports a new integration to the Mercury Security MS Bridge that allows organizations to economically migrate to an open access control platform while protecting their existing investment. Booth 28055, Circle 447.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Abloy%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:125px;" />WEATHERPROOF LOCKS</h4><p>Abloy Security of Irving, Texas, offers a range of tough locks that can withstand severe weather conditions and environmental extremes. ABLOY PROTEC2 CLIQ LED key and interface make it easy to retrofit mechanical locks with electromechanical models. There are no batteries in the locks, because the power comes from the key. CLIQ technology provides audit trails in both the lock and the key, flexible time functions, and immediate removal of lost keys. All padlocks feature case-hardened boron-steel shackles and hardened steel UL-listed cylinders. Patent-protected keys can also open ABLOY door locks, and the keys cannot be duplicated. Booth 8061, Circle 448.</p><p>​ </p><h4>PROTECTIVE COVERS<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/STI%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:140px;" /></h4><p>STI tough polycarbonate covers from Safety Technology International, Inc., of Waterford, Michigan, help prevent theft and vandalism to larger keypads, access controls, volume and lighting controls, and other similar devices. Molded of clear polycarbonate, which is the same material used in football helmets, each protected unit can be clearly seen and quickly identified. The cover has a strong piano-style hinge, enclosed back box, gasket, and lock. Other models are available. Booth 30044, Circle 449.</p><p> </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Commport%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:201px;" />UNDER-VEHICLE INSPECTION</h4><p>The CPAS enhanced under-vehicle surveillance systems from Comm Port Technologies of Cranbury, New Jersey, has been re-engineered with advanced metal alloys to support up to 78 tons. Security personnel can view the entire length of a vehicle in real time and full color. Full high-definition color is supported even with vehicles moving up to 75 kilometers per hour. As part of the updated package, CPAS now includes a driver image camera, automatic number plate recognition, templates, and automatic comparison software all bundled together. Booth 352, Circle 450.</p><p>​ </p><h4>ANTI-TAILGATING SYSTEM<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/DSI%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:135px;" /></h4><p>Designed Security, Inc., (DSI) of Bastrop, Texas, introduced the Entry Sentry, an optical security device that detects multiple persons entering a doorway on a single valid authorization. It uses proprietary sensing technology to detect direction and tailgating, and it is compatible with all card reader technologies and access control systems. The system mounts easily on standard door frames and hallway walls. Entry Sentry consists of two self-contained, narrow door- or wall-mounted units that provide both local and remote alarm indications. Booth 19109, Circle 451.</p><p>​ </p><h4><img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/Mercury%20Final%20copy.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:168px;" />SECURITY PANELS</h4><p>Mercury Security Products, LLC, of Long Beach, California, released the new MS Bridge series. New MS Bridge multi-device interface panels are designed to fit the specific physical parameters of Software House Pro Series access systems, and they can be easily installed for a changeover to the Authentic Mercury open platform. The award-winning solution provides a cost-effective and streamlined path to move beyond the limitations of proprietary hardware for feature-rich access control. The Authentic Mercury model also allows customers to choose from industry-leading access control software providers, both at time of product selection and in the future as their needs evolve. Circle 452.</p></div>

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/21st-century-security-and-cpted-designing-critical-infrastructure-protection-and-crime-prev-0.aspx21st Century Security and CPTED: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Crime Prevention, Second Edition.<div class="body"> <p> <em> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">CRC Press. Available from ASIS, item #2078; 954 pages; $120 (ASIS member), $132 (nonmember). Also available as e-book.</span> </span> </em> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">As good as the first edition of 21st Century Security and CPTED was, this second edition surpasses it. Atlas, known in security circles as a consummate professional, has done an outstanding job in creating this second edition, which has twice as much material as the original edition. It also includes voluminous references and hundreds of outstanding clarifying photos in both color and black-and-white. Using humor and candid insight he incorporates all the concepts of CPTED, including design, construction, security countermeasures, and risk management strategies, and merges them into a highly informative reference manual for security practitioners at every level.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">There is a logical flow to the book. It lays a solid foundation by discussing architecture and its intent, as well as environmental crime control theories and premises liability. There is something here for everyone as it also discusses terrorism and critical infrastructure from differing perspectives. Several chapters on problem solving provide guidance on conducting threat, risk, and vulnerability assessments.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Throughout, Atlas provides a roadmap for merging security and CPTED into management principles and practices in a wide variety of facility settings, including healthcare facilities, critical infrastructure, ATMs, office buildings, parking lots and structures, and parks and green spaces. The latter portion of the book is reserved for concepts including lighting, LEED and GREEN certification, workplace violence, signage, data capture and analysis, and conducting CPTED surveys.</span> </span> </p> <p> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Atlas has created the definitive book on CPTED and security. Despite the magnitude and complexity of the science and art of security management, he has done an outstanding job of merging these and other disciplines and concepts together into a cogent display of information that the reader should be able to apply in a wide variety of locations and situations. If you are only going to buy one book this year, it is strongly suggested you purchase this one. </span> </span> </p> <hr /> <p> <span style="color:#800000;"> <strong> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;">Reviewer:</span> </span> </strong> </span> <span style="font-size:small;"> <span style="font-family:arial;"> Glen Kitteringham, CPP, has worked in the security industry since 1990. He holds a master’s degree in security and crime risk management. He is president of Kitteringham Security Group Inc., which consults with companies around the globe. </span> </span> </p> </div>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Running-on-Empty.aspxRunning on Empty<p>​In this age of overload, with organizations trying to do more with less, employees buried in information, and devices that call for round-the-clock urgency, burnout is a malady ripe for our times. Burnout can strike even the most productive workers and the most consistent performers, as well as those who seem to have the greatest capacity for hard work, experts say. </p><p>One reason burnout is such a pernicious problem is that it does not have to be total for its effects to be devastating.</p><p>“Burnout tends to plateau rather than peak,” says Paula Davis-Laack, specialist in burnout prevention programs, founder and CEO of the Stress and Resilience Institute, and author of Addicted To Busy: Your Blueprint for Burnout Prevention. “Burnout exists on a continuum. You don’t have to be completely mentally broken down and barely able to get out of bed to feel major effects.”</p><p>In other words, employees suffering mid-level burnout may still be able to power through and complete an adequate amount of work by sheer force of will, but their partially depleted state greatly hinders their performance and productivity, and it keeps them from realizing their full potential. </p><p>“That can go on for months, or even years, depending on the person’s work ethic,” says management expert Brady Wilson, cofounder of Juice Inc. and author of Beyond Engagement and other business performance books. </p><p>In a field like security, workers can be especially vulnerable to burnout, given the continual pressure and stress that go into protecting people and assets, and the high stakes involved if a breach does occur. </p><p>“Constant job pressure, especially when some of the factors are out of your control like they are with security, is definitely one of the causes of burnout in employees,” says Carlos Morales, vice president of global sales, engineering, and operations at Arbor Networks, which specializes in network security. </p><p>The consequences of burnout are varied; in some cases, they involve serious health issues. Davis-Laack, who became a specialist in the field after burning out as a practicing attorney, says she experienced weekly panic attacks and a few stomachaches that were so painful they sent her to the emergency room. Coronary disease, depression, and alcohol abuse are other possible consequences. </p><p>For the employer, burnout can significantly compromise workplace quality, causing more absenteeism, turnover, accident risk, and cynicism, while lowering morale and commitment and reducing willingness among workers to help others.</p><p>Fortunately, in many cases burnout can either be avoided, with deft management and a supportive organization, or significantly alleviated using various strategic methods. But like most maladies, it must be understood before it can be properly addressed. ​</p><h4>Symptoms and Conditions</h4><p>Burnout occurs when the demands people face on the job outstrip the resources they possess to meet them. Psychologists who study burnout as a condition divide it into it three dimensions: exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment.</p><p>When the first aspect—exhaustion—hits, the employee may feel emotionally, physically, and cognitively depleted. This often spurs feelings of diminished powers; challenges that were formerly manageable can seem insurmountable. As Davis-Laack describes her own experience of this condition: “Every curveball seems like a crisis.”</p><p>When depersonalization occurs, an employee may start to feel alienated from his or her own job, and more cynical and resentful toward the organization. Work and its mission lose meaning; feelings of going-through-the-motions increase. Detached and numb, the employee tries to plow ahead. </p><p>Exhaustion and depersonalization often combine to produce the third component of reduced personal accomplishment. As Wilson explains, the depleted employee possesses considerably less “executive function,” or the ability to focus, self-regulate, connect the dots between ideas, strategize, analyze, execute smoothly, and follow through—all of which can be thought of as “the power tools of innovation.” </p><p>“Nuanced thinking and value-added thinking are the first to go when employees are exhausted,” he says. “Instead, they rely on duct-tape fixes, reactivity, firefighting. They don’t get to the root causes of problems and issues.” </p><p>The state of mind that burnout can elicit sometimes leads to self-blame, where the employee feels that he or she is professionally inadequate. But that is unfair, says Davis-Laack: “I don’t want individual workers to feel that it’s all their fault.” </p><p>The root causes of burnout, she explains, are usually a product of what employees bring to the table—work ethic, how closely they tie work to self-worth, their level of perfectionism—and how the organization itself functions, which can be an important factor. </p><p>Understanding key organizational conditions, experts say, will help managers maintain a culture that protects employees from burning out. One of these conditions involves what the organization chooses to reward. </p><p>Wilson explains this as follows. For many years, many organizations stressed the importance of keeping employees engaged. But the definition of engagement has shifted, so that many firms now define engaged workers as those with clear dedication and commitment, who come to work early and stay late. “What’s missing from this definition is passion, enthusiasm, verve, and spirit,” he says. </p><p>When engagement is so defined, increased effort, such as working more hours and taking on more projects, is rewarded. But simply increasing hours at the office does not produce high performance, Wilson says. </p><p>“We get our epiphanies in the shower—we don’t get them when we are determined and gritting our teeth around a board room table. It’s not effort that produces brilliance, it’s energy,” he explains. But sometimes, the more-rewards-for-more-work philosophy can function as an unintentional incentive to burn out.</p><p>The organization’s day-to-day working conditions are also a crucial here. Research has found that two factors can be deadly in sapping an employee’s resources, according to Davis-Laack. </p><p>One is role conflict and ambiguity, which can occur when employees are never clear on exactly what is expected of them, and on what part they should be playing in active projects. “That’s very wearing on people,” she says. </p><p>Another is unfairness, which is often related to office politics. This can include favoritism, failure to recognize contributions, being undermined, or dealing with the demands of never-satisfied supervisors.</p><p>Such stressful conditions push some employees into “gas guzzling” energy mode, because they require so much emotional effort just to cope with them, Wilson says. </p><p>“Substances generated by stress, such as cortisol and adrenaline, have a beautiful utilitarian use—to get us out of trouble, to keep us safe,” he explains. “But we are not as productive when we have a brain that is bathed in those things day in and day out.”  ​</p><h4>Detection</h4><p>Although it is vital for managers to strive to maintain a positive office culture, it’s also important to recognize that burnout can happen even in the healthiest of environments. Given this, Morales encourages attempts at early detection.  </p><p>“As a manager or executive, it is important to first note the factors that tend to cause burnout even before employees begin to show signs,” he says. “This gives you the opportunity to address issues proactively with employees.” </p><p>These factors, he explains, include a very travel-heavy schedule (50 percent or more of total work time); consistently logging work weeks of 60-plus hours; unrelenting expectations of working off-hours and on weekends; and constant deadline time pressure. </p><p>But since early detection is not always successful or even possible in some cases, managers should also be looking for common signs of burnout that their employees might be exhibiting. Morales advises security managers to look for combinations of the following characteristics that are different from usual behaviors:</p><ul><li><p> General lack of energy and enthusiasm around job functions and projects.<br></p></li><li><p> Extreme sensitivity and irritability towards coworkers, management, and work situations.<br></p></li><li><p> Constant signs of stress and anxiety.<br></p></li><li><p>Significant changes in social patterns with coworkers.<br></p></li><li><p>Sharp drop in quantity and timeliness of output.​<br></p></li></ul><p>When looking for signs of burnout, it’s important for a manager to have a high degree of familiarity with the employee in question, a familiarity which is a byproduct of a strong manager-staff relationship. </p><p>“You’ve got to know your people,” Davis-Laack says. “When someone seems more checked out and disengaged than usual, if you know your people well enough, you can spot it.” ​</p><h4>Treatment</h4><p>When it becomes clear that an employee is suffering from burnout, managers have several options for treatment and alleviation, experts say. Morales says he believes that managers must first come to an understanding of the underlying factors, so that they can be addressed.   </p><p>“If there is a workload issue, a manager may be able to spread out the workload with other workers to alleviate the issue,” he says. “It’s important to let the employees know that this is being done to gain more scale, and to reinforce that they are doing a good job.”</p><p>Indeed, crushing workloads are now common in many workplaces, experts say, as many companies are actively cost cutting while attempting to raise productivity and output. And for employees who work with data, such as security employees who use analytics, benchmarks, or some form of metrics, the information explosion is requiring more and more staff hours to keep up with the processing and analysis. Managers must be cognizant of this, Davis-Laack says. </p><p>“If you do nothing but pile work on people—well, people are not robots and they are not computers. They are going to wear out,” she explains.</p><p>To combat this, managers should employ a strategic and honest operations analysis, she advises. The department may be generating more output with increasing workloads, but burnout and turnover risk is also increasing, as is the likelihood of costly mistakes. Is it worth the risk? Hiring additional help or outsourcing some tasks may be cheaper in the long run than the costs due to turnover and errors. </p><p>When a department conducts a strategic review of operations, the focus is often on fixing glitches in process, experts say. A focus on reducing workload is less common, but when it is adopted, it often reveals that certain time-consuming tasks are unnecessary.</p><p>If the burnout is caused by a stressful job function, such as a security position in which the worker is protecting assets of great value, the manager can discuss the situation with the employee and ensure that support is available, Morales says. “This may help them feel less alone or helpless in situations,” he says.   </p><p>Another key strategy for managers is to add extra focus and energy to the resources part of the puzzle, Davis-Laack says. “Help them to build up their energy bank account, so they are not always feeling depleted.” </p><p>She offers five ways for managers to do so:  </p><ul><li><p> Maintain and ensure high-quality relationships between managers and staff members, and between team members themselves. This fosters a healthy and safe environment where problems can be discussed and addressed.  <br></p></li><li><p> Whenever possible, give team members some decision authority. This gives them a sense of autonomy and strength when dealing with issues, and helps avoid feelings of powerlessness. <br></p></li><li><p> Follow the FAST system of respectful feedback—give frequent, accurate, specific, and timely feedback. This helps employees make tweaks and adjustments, and lets them know they are on the right course.  <br></p></li><li><p> Demonstrate that you have the employees’ backs, and always be willing to go to bat for them. Don’t point fingers or complain to higher ups when mistakes are made. This is crucial in building trust.  <br></p></li><li><p> Identify and encourage skills that will help your team members build resilience. These will vary depending on the specific job and situation, but include any skill or resource that can be used when challenges arise, as well as those that help manage stress.  ​<br></p></li></ul><p>In working toward the previous point, managers may want to brainstorm with staff to find ways to make everyone more resourceful. For instance, managers could periodically check in with staff members to determine the team’s overall level of resources, so they can replenish them when they’re low.</p><p>Indeed, soliciting solutions from staff is an excellent practice for managers, because it shows they are partnering with employees, not parenting them, Wilson says. The parenting style of management assumes that the manager has knowledge that the worker will never have, and it sets up the employee for helplessness. The partnering style cultivates the employees’ decision-making skills, so they can skillfully meet their own needs. ​</p><h4>Touchy Subject</h4><p>Burnout can be a sensitive subject. Some workers attach great self-worth to their productivity and performance, and do not like to concede that they are struggling. </p><p>“It is very difficult for some high performers to admit that their engagement is lacking. There’s a sense of judgment associated with that,” Wilson says. </p><p>Some of these workers truly are burned out despite their failure to admit it, and they may be in a precarious state. “I have seen cases where the hardest and most productive workers will not admit to burnout,” Morales says. “In these situations, burnout occurs quite suddenly, without many of the behavioral warning signs.”</p><p>Other employees fear that admitting burnout is disclosing a weakness, one that could prevent them from future promotions or ultimately cost them their job. “They like their work and they don’t want to change jobs, or </p><p>they can’t change jobs because they have monetary obligations,” Davis-Laack says. </p><p>Here, management can go a long way by being proactive and soliciting feedback from workers regarding their state of mind. “It’s important to have regular discussions with employees about the impact of the workload on them personally, and give them every opportunity to talk through their situation, and vent if necessary,” Morales says. “It’s important for management to recognize the potential for burnout and approach employees proactively to discuss it. It provides employees a safe environment in which to talk through the situation.”</p><p>In these situations, a manager can approach an employee with a proactive goal—how can workload and workplace environment be shaped so that the employee is energized in the office, and still has energy left at the end of the day and on weekends for a life outside of work, Wilson explains.  </p><p>Using this framework, Wilson adds that it is often easier for the manager to then ask, “What’s getting in the way of that? Is it bureaucratic interference? Is there too much on your plate? Is there bullying going on, or other workplace environment problems?”  ​</p><h4>More Recognition</h4><p>But while burnout is still a sensitive subject among some workers, there is also a growing recognition that it is a serious issue that needs to be dealt with, experts say. This may be partly driven by recent research in fields like healthcare and finance, where findings suggest that burnout and overwork are causing costly mistakes that are detrimental to a company’s bottom line. </p><p>Moreover, more business leaders see that the problem, if left unchecked, will just get worse in the future, due to factors such as globalization and a web of technology that is becoming more and more complex. “The perfect storm is upon us,” Wilson says.</p><p>Davis-Laack says she is heartened by the fact that the burnout issue, which was frequently dismissed as too “soft” to be a subject at business conferences, is appearing on more agendas. </p><p>“It’s finally starting to get attention across different professions and different sectors,” she says. “Managers are taking it more seriously.” ​​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Redefining-Loss.aspxRedefining Loss<p>​The world of retail has relied on the word “shrinkage” for more than 100 years to describe the losses companies experience as they go about their business. Shrinkage, however, is almost a euphemistic term describing a simple contraction in the size of the stock held by a company, without offering any real sense of what the cause might be. </p><p>In this way, the term is similar to “shoplifting”—a rather benign term often used by the industry to describe people actively engaging in criminal acts of theft in stores. For comparison’s sake, you rarely see burglars or robbers described as houselifters or purselifters.</p><p>Four buckets of loss tend to be included in survey descriptions of what shrinkage is: external theft, internal theft, administrative or process errors, and vendor fraud. The term “administrative error or process failures” is particularly vague; depending upon the type of retailer and the types of products sold, it can potentially cover an enormous array of types of loss, including damage, spoilage, product going out of date, and incorrect price adjustments. </p><p>A retailer selling food and using a shrink­age definition that includes food spoilage will have a dif­ferent level of loss compared to a retailer selling clothing or auto parts; yet, many shrinkage surveys continue to combine this data together to generate an overall figure for the industry. </p><p>To date, there is no consistent, detailed definition or typology of shrinkage. It is a term that is used throughout the industry, but interpreted in different ways depending on the retail environment and the prevailing organizational culture and practices.</p><p>There is a constant desire to understand what the root causes of shrinkage are: Is it mainly external thieves? Is it the staff employed by retailers helping themselves to the stock? Is it due to organizational inefficiencies? Or is it caused by retail suppliers wrongly delivering on purpose or through error?</p><p>Surveys will often provide numbers that supposedly apportion the total shrinkage losses to each of these types of losses, with external theft frequently—but not exclusively—seen as causing the largest amount. </p><p>The reality is that what these reported shrinkage numbers are actually measuring is what respondents think the causes of shrinkage might be. They are much more a gauge of how the loss prevention industry is feeling than any true measure of the breakdown of losses within the retail industry.</p><p>This is because the vast majority of current shrinkage data collected by retailers is based on periodic audit data collected in stores and sometimes in parts of the distribution network. This data captures the difference between the value of stock retailers think they have and the amount that can be physically counted. The difference between the two is how most companies measure their shrinkage.</p><p>But all this data does is provide a value of how much stock is not there. What it does not do is offer an explanation as to why it has gone missing: Was the stock delivered to the retailer? Did a customer steal it? Was it damaged or stolen in the supply chain? Did an employee steal it? </p><p>The causes could be many and varied, but what is clear is that audit data is rarely good at explaining why discrepancies exist; it simply captures the value of losses where the cause is unknown. Attempts to apportion causes to this data will always involve a high degree of guesswork and personal prejudice.</p><p>Retailing has gone through some profound changes since shrinkage was first used back in the 19th century, not least the introduction of open displays, the growth of branding, greater consumer choice, introduction of credit cards and debit cards, the rise of online shopping, and the widespread use of various types of self-service checkout systems, to name a few. </p><p>Yet, throughout this time of enormous change, the retail industry has continued to use a term that vaguely captures the difference between expected and actual stock values as the core measure of loss in their businesses.</p><p>Given this, it’s time to reconsider how retail companies understand and measure the losses they experience and to develop a more consistent approach to enable future benchmarking activities to offer more meaningful and applicable information.​</p><h4>Total Retail Loss<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/0417%20Cover%20Story%20Infographic.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:652px;" /></h4><p>Both the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s Asset Protection Leaders Council, based in the United States, and the ECR Community Shrinkage and On-shelf Availability Group, headquartered in Europe, supported a research project led by the author to explore how retailers currently view the problem of loss across their business and develop a new definition and typology that might better capture their impact. </p><p>The research, detailed in the report Beyond Shrinkage: Introducing Total Retail Loss, used several different methodologies: an extensive literature review; a questionnaire to a group of large European retailers; 100 face-to-face interviews with senior directors of 10 of the largest U.S. retailers; and a series of workshops and focus groups with loss prevention representatives from a range of European retailers and manufacturers.</p><p><strong>Loss versus cost. </strong>One of the difficulties of benchmarking any retail business using shrinkage is understanding what categories of retail loss are included or excluded. </p><p>Some companies taking part in this research adopted strict criteria: shrinkage is only the value of their unknown losses based upon the difference be­tween expected and actual values; anything else is regarded as known and, therefore, not included in the calculation.</p><p>Other companies were much more inclusive, incorporating other types of loss ranging from damages, wastage, spoilage, and price markdowns to the costs of burglaries and robberies.</p><p>Part of this definitional variance seemed to be based on how respondents interpreted the difference between what could be considered a “loss” compared with a “cost,” the latter being viewed as an everyday planned and necessary expenditure for the business to achieve its profit goals. Respondents varied considerably in how they interpreted the difference, although many made a key distinction between the value of the outcome and how this differentiated costs from losses.</p><p>“Costs—they bring value to the business; they are incurred because there is a perceived positive purpose in having them. They are part of the revenue generation process and without them, profits would be negatively impacted,” one respondent said. “Losses are things which, if they didn’t happen, there would be no negative impact upon profitability. They do not offer any real value to the business and simply act as a drain on profitability.”</p><p>It was also instructive to hear how some respondents adopted a process of normalizing what some considered to be losses into costs. One respondent explained that “we plan a lot of those costs [possible types of losses], so when we’re looking at it from a planning perspective, we have that built in—anything that we can account for and process and know what it is, we take more so as a cost rather than a loss when we’re defining it.”</p><p>Another respondent talked about how the planning and budgeting process enabled many losses to be redefined as costs. “If it goes above budget, then it becomes a loss; otherwise it is a cost,” the individual explained, while another respondent was blunter: “We try and convert as much of [losses] to costs; it’s then not on my agenda anymore. I deal with shrink.”</p><p><strong>Definition. </strong>From the interviews with senior U.S. retail executives and feedback from the roundtables held in Europe, definitions of costs and losses were eventually developed.</p><p>Costs were defined as “expenditure on activities and investments that are considered to make some form of recognizable contribution to generating current or future retail income.”</p><p>Losses were defined as “events and outcomes that negatively impact retail profitability and make no positive, identifiable and intrinsic contribution to generating income.” Using these definitions, various types of events and activities could then begin to be categorized accordingly. </p><p>For example, incidents of customer theft can be considered a loss—the event and outcome play no intrinsic role in generating retail profits—because it makes no identifiable contribution and were it not to happen, the business would only benefit.</p><p>Alternatively, incidents of customer compensation, such as providing a disgruntled shopper with a discounted price, can be seen as a cost. In this case, the business is incurring the cost because it believes compensating the aggrieved consumer makes the individual more likely to shop with the business in the future. The policy of compensating is an investment in future profit generation and is categorized as a cost—not a loss.</p><p>Another example of a loss is workers’ compensation, where a retailer will cover the legal, medical, and other costs associated with an accident at work, such as falling off a ladder. There is no intrinsic value to the business if an employee is injured at work; if it had not happened, the business would only benefit by not having to pay for the consequences of the event. Therefore, workers’ compensation is a loss.</p><p>While some respondents to this research argued that workers’ compensation is a predictable problem that can be—and is—budgeted for, it still remains an event that the retailer would prefer not happen because it negatively impacts overall profitability.</p><p>In contrast, expenditure on loss prevention activities and approaches, such as employing security officers or installing tagging systems, can be seen as a cost. The retailer has committed to this expenditure because it feels there will be some form of payback from the investment: lower levels of loss, which in turn will boost profits. Whether this payback is measured or achieved is open to debate.</p><p>What these examples focus on is not whether an activity or event can be controlled or whether the incurred cost was planned, but its fundamental role in generating current or future retail income. If a clearly identifiable link can be made between an activity and the generation of retail income, then it should be regarded as a cost; all those activities and events where no link can be found should be viewed as a loss.</p><p><strong>Categorizing losses</strong>. In developing the categories of the Total Retail Loss Typology, it was important to draw a distinction between the types of loss that can be measured in a way that is manageable for modern retail business, and those that cannot. </p><p>Additionally, it was important to consider the value of collecting data on a given loss indicator. Is it meaningful for the business to monitor a category of loss? Will its analysis offer potentially actionable outcomes that may help the business meet its objectives?</p><p>There is little point in developing a typology made up of a series of categories that are either impossible or implausibly difficult to measure or once measured offer little benefit to the business undertaking the exercise.</p><p>For example, most retailers would be keen to understand how often items are not scanned at a checkout. While it is theoretically possible to measure this, the reality for most retailers is that the ongoing cost would probably be prohibitive. </p><p>Determining whether proposed loss categories met the three M’s test (manageable, measurable, and meaningful) was an important part of creating a typology likely to achieve any form of adoption across a broad range of retail formats.</p><p><strong>Typology.</strong> The research identified 31 types of known loss that are included in the Total Retail Loss Typology covering a wide range of losses across the retail enterprise and incorporating events and outcomes beyond just the loss of merchandise. The typology is broken down into four locations of loss: store, retail supply chain, e-commerce, and corporate. Each location then has a variety of subcategories divided between malicious and nonmalicious. </p><p>For example, a malicious corporate retail loss would be fraud; a nonmalicious corporate retail loss would be workers’ compensation, regulatory fines, or bad debt. </p><p>However, the term does not encompass every form of loss that a retailer could conceivably experience. The word “total” is being used in this context to represent a much broader and more detailed interpretation of what can be regarded as a retail loss, rather than necessarily claiming to reflect the entirety of events and activities that could constitute a loss. In the future, the scope and range of the Total Retail Loss Typology will change to accommodate new forms of loss, and this is welcomed.</p><p>The typology is designed to enable the calculation of the value of retail losses, not necessarily the number of events; where an associated value cannot be calculated or there is no loss of value associated with an incident, it should not be included.</p><p>For instance, if shop thieves are apprehended leaving a retail store and the goods they were attempting to steal are successfully recovered and can be sold at full value at a later date, there is no financial loss associated with the incident. The retailer may still want to record that the attempted theft took place and was successfully dealt with, but that it would not be recorded in the Total Retail Loss Typology.​</p><h4>Potential </h4><p>The proposed Total Retail Loss Typology is a radical departure from how most retail companies have understood and defined the problem of loss within their companies, moving away from a definition focused primarily on unknown stock loss to one that encompasses a broader range of risks across a wider spectrum of locations.</p><p>While there is a simple elegance about the approach adopted in the past, based upon the four traditional buckets of shrinkage, it is increasingly recognized that these broad brush and ambiguously defined categories are no longer capable of accurately capturing the increasingly complex risk picture now found in modern retailing. Instead, the Total Retail Loss Typology has the potential to benefit retail organizations by managing complexity, encouraging transparency, creating opportunities, and maximizing loss prevention.</p><p><strong>Managing complexity. </strong>The retail landscape in which shrinkage was first described has been transformed by innovation and change. Simply relying upon the traditional four buckets of estimated losses to fully reflect and properly convey the scale, nature, and impact of retail losses is no longer appropriate, particularly as the retail environment becomes more dynamic and fast changing.</p><p><strong>Encouraging transp</strong><strong>arency.</strong> The ambiguous nature of most shrinkage calculations and the difficulty of understanding its root causes generate a lack of accountability, particularly within retail stores.</p><p>Store managers question the reliability of the number, especially where there is a pervasive sense that the supply chain may be foisting losses upon stores that are actually caused by inefficiencies. Unknown store losses can conveniently be blamed upon short shipments or roaming bands of organized thieves, rather than being apportioned to actual events taking place in the store.</p><p>Losses can also be moved between different categories, depending upon the performance measures in place—wastage can quickly become shrinkage if the former is identified as a key performance indicator. </p><p>By measuring a broader range of categories of loss, it becomes much more difficult to play this game; most losses will be measured somewhere, improving transparency and accountability throughout the organization.</p><p><strong>Creating opportunities.</strong> A recurring theme from the research was the lack of prioritization and urgency associated with categories of loss that had already been measured or for which a budget had been allocated.</p><p>Many respondents were quick to view these factors as a cost; therefore, not requiring any remedial action by the business. In effect, the process of capturing the loss or planning for it through budget allocation rendered them immune from concern over the actual loss.</p><p>By adopting a systematic approach and agreeing on the definition of a retail loss and bringing these together under a single typology, opportunities may arise to minimize the overall impact of loss upon the business.</p><p><strong>Maximizing loss prevention.</strong> Dealing with an unknown loss, which is what most loss prevention practitioners typically focus on, is probably one of the hardest challenges faced by a management team in retail. This requires the team to develop a high level of analytical and problem solving capacity.</p><p>Trying to solve problems where the cause is typically unknown is also at the hard end of the management spectrum. It requires creative thinking, imaginative use of data, and considerable experience. Imagine if these capabilities were used on the broader range of known problems encapsulated in the Total Retail Loss Typology. The impact could be profound.</p><p><strong>Using resources. </strong>By generating a broader, more detailed understanding of how losses are impacting a retail organization, it may be possible to take a more strategic approach to the allocation and use of existing resources.</p><p>The Total Retail Loss Typology could offer value in how businesses not only respond to existing loss-related challenges, but also use it to review the implication of any future business decisions. </p><p>The interplay between sales and losses needs to be viewed in the round and not as a series of cross-functional trade-offs where losses and profits are allocated separately, driving behaviors that are unlikely to benefit the business.</p><p>It’s within this context that the Total Retail Loss Typology has been developed—to enable retail organizations to better understand the nature, scale, and extent of losses across the entire business, and to use this information to make more informed choices about how to grow profits and improve customer satisfaction.</p><p>As the pace of change in retail con­tinues to intensify, it’s time for the loss prevention industry to begin to move away from a notion of loss developed in the 19th century to one that better reflects and recognizes the complexities and challenges found in the 21st century.  </p><p><em><strong>Adrian Beck </strong>is a professor of criminology in the Department of Criminology at the University of Leicester in Leicester, United Kingdom. Beck undertook the study Beyond Shrinkage: Introducing Total Retail Loss commissioned by the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s Asset Protection Leaders Council and is an academic advisor to the ECR Community Shrinkage and On-Shelf Availability Group. ​ ​</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465