Perimeter Protection

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Harden-Soft-Targets-with-PSIM.aspxHarden Soft Targets with PSIMGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-10-23T04:00:00Z<p>​Soft targets—those that are readily accessible to the public, like shopping malls, hotels, and hospitals—are especially vulnerable to attack by terrorists, criminals, and other bad actors. Recent attacks around the globe have raised awareness of the need to protect these spaces. Security practitioners must keep in mind that the duty of care for enterprises extends beyond just a company's employees to anyone who sets foot on the property.  </p><p>In these locations, typical physical security solutions include clear separation between public and staff-only areas, controlled access to sensitive areas to prevent unauthorized entry, and limited access to the facility during nonbusiness hours. These measures rely heavily on implementing and managing varying levels of access permissions for each area using a mix of security technologies. And even the best deployments of these systems do not eliminate risk; rather they help security to contain the threat.   </p><p>With many diverse systems, this becomes a complex task that could quickly overwhelm security staff who are also tasked with monitoring, identifying, and responding to events. For multi-use facilities, physical security information management (PSIM) solutions simplify these complicated procedures with automated, intelligent alerts and response actions, along with greatly improved situational awareness. </p><p><strong>Alerting</strong></p><p>Any time an unauthorized individual enters a private or sensitive area, organizations should treat that incident as suspicious unless and until they learn there is a valid reason for the entry. And with every security breach—whether intentional or unintentional, malicious or harmless—time is of the essence. This underscores the vital need for operators and other security staff to know about the situation as soon as possible. With automation and the ability to seamlessly integrate multiple systems into a single interface, PSIM solutions can speed the alerting process to improve awareness and response.</p><p>​For example, integrated access control and surveillance systems with video analytics could be deployed to alert staff when individuals enter a restricted area, such as a data center, after hours. When an alert comes in from the access control system, the PSIM solution can automatically call up surveillance video associated with the event, providing operators with direct visibility into the situation. </p><p>Another alert could be triggered by an initial report or description submitted by a mobile user. In this case, the PSIM could correlate with nearby video and other systems. Regardless of the source of the alert, the solution ensures that operators have instant access to valuable information and insight, allowing them to quickly assess the situation and initiate the appropriate response based on a full understanding of an incident. </p><p><strong>Response</strong></p><p>Once an alert has been generated, established actions must be in place to help staff determine the appropriate course of action to resolve an issue as quickly as possible. In many cases, no response is necessary. For instance, if an individual holds a door open for a few seconds, the access control system may generate a door-prop alert. Using video associated with the action, an operator can determine in seconds whether this was to allow unauthorized entry or if the person entering simply paused to read an email or text on a cell phone. Without the video capability, a guard would need to be dispatched to assess the situation—not the most efficient use of time and resources.</p><p>Given the large number of nonactionable alerts operators receive throughout their shifts, they may not be prepared for an event that does require action, regardless of how well they have been trained. This can cause confusion and stress, which can complicate the situation and lead to chaos. Having well-defined standard operating procedures (SOPs) in place to guide operators and others through each process reduces the potential for stress, panic, or confusion, all of which contribute to a high potential for human error. However, complicated or difficult-to-locate SOPs will do nothing to reduce this likelihood. </p><p>PSIM can automate many of the more mundane and basic steps to simplify processes and allow operators to focus only on the most critical tasks that require human intervention, such as determining whether a person seen on video represents a potential threat. This enables security staff to quickly assess the situation and determine the most appropriate response. </p><p><strong>Real-Time Situational Awareness</strong></p><p>When responding to an incident, it is important for guards, first responders and others to have the most complete information to ensure the most effective and efficient response. </p><p>​Integrated systems improve this awareness by providing large amounts of data from various systems that can be combined to evaluate an incident. While searching myriad systems to gather and sort through this information manually is not feasible, automated PSIM solutions put all the relevant information at operators' fingertips. This allows security staff to make quick, accurate decisions based on a complete picture of an event and easily share information in real time with appropriate responders and coordinate response among all parties involved. This collaboration provides critical situational awareness to those responders, who can then make faster, more informed decisions that enable swift response to help prevent an incident from unfolding.</p><p>A wide variety of challenges arise when securing facilities and campuses with multiple levels of access privileges. By deploying a PSIM to aggregate crucial information, organizations can overcome the many challenges they face while also increasing safety and security for these potentially complex applications.</p><p><em>Simon Morgan is chief technology officer for SureView Systems.</em></p>

Perimeter Protection

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Physical-Security.aspxPhysical Security<p><em>Butterworth-Heinemann; Elsevier.com; 204 pages; $79.95.</em></p><p>​The second edition of <em>Physical Security: 150 Things You Should Know</em> is an excellent reference for security practitioners and managers. Written by Lawrence J. Fennelly and Marianna Perry, CPP, the book covers the most common concepts and concerns in security today; from lighting and CPTED to cyber and drones. To borrow from the book’s opening lines, it is a roadmap to building and enhancing an organization’s security program.</p><p>The authors do a great job of organizing an overwhelming amount of material. The book is likely to serve more as a go-to reference for a particular topic rather than to be read from cover to cover. </p><p>A security practitioner with a fundamental understanding of security will find this book to be an exceptional resource for planning security upgrades, training security staff, and finding justification for best practices with the C-suite. Many sections are nothing more than easy-to-follow checklists, so retrieving the information is remarkably simple and quick.   </p><p>The broad range of topics addressed in the book makes it impossible for the authors to dig too deep on any single issue, so many of the sections do not offer full explanations. This, however, does not take anything away from the quality or usefulness of the book. </p><p>The concepts are outlined in carefully selected paragraphs that provide just enough detail to jog the memory or provide a starting point for further research from more-focused sources. All in all, this book offers great ideas and best practices for a broad range of security topics, not just physical security.</p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Yan Byalik, CPP,</strong> is the security administrator for the City of Newport News Virginia. He is a graduate of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets and has worked in a variety of security roles in higher education, amusement park, and telecommunication security sectors since 2001. He is the assistant regional vice president for ASIS Region 5A in southeast Virginia.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-a-Professional-Guard-Force.aspxBuilding a Professional Guard Force<p>In today's environment of heightened security in all areas, security departments are struggling to attract and retain high-quality guards. Now more than ever, it's vital to examine how security guards are evaluated, trained, and compensated.</p><p>All entities, including corporations and government facilities, understand the importance of a top-notch security force. However, not all of them recognize the elements needed to create such a force.</p><p>Security managers may presume that a security guard who passed the preemployment screening and successfully completed training when hired will perform the required duties well. And that may be true. But human nature allows people to become complacent, cut corners, and get too comfortable. Continuing education, regularly scheduled evaluations, and enhanced training can improve the team's performance.</p><p>On March 1, 2016, at Escuela Campo Alegre, Caracas, Venezuela, we initiated a new method of recruitment and selection for incoming loss prevention and control analysts (LPCAs). At that time, we chose to enhance our program by hiring 10 people with bachelor's or associate degrees in engineering, economics, administration, education, and other related fields.</p><p>We developed a screening and training program for candidates hoping to join our security team as LPCAs. In addition, we created a regimen of close supervision and daily evaluation of the security force to reinforce the training. </p><p>Here are the elements that led to success in creating excellent employees for our school's protection, from the first job application to seasoned protection professional.</p><p><strong>SCREENING AND TRAINING</strong></p><p><strong>Detailed job description. </strong>Experience has taught me the importance of a detailed and clearly stated job description. Candidates for the position of LPCA receive a precise explanation of the duties and expectations. This is presented first so that potential candidates fully understand the duties and responsibilities of the position. If the job description isn't something the candidate wants to do, we have saved everyone a lot of time.</p><p><strong>Required qualifications. </strong>Every security force has necessary requirements when seeking team members such as age, place of residence, experience, physical abilities, criminal background, and computer skills. Education, of course, is taken into consideration, and at Escuela Campo Alegre we look for higher education, from associate degree to bachelor's degree and up, for LPCA candidates.</p><p><strong>Testing potential candidates. </strong>LPCAs must have certain abilities from the beginning.</p><p><em>Observation.</em> The candidate must be attentive and aware at all times of the general appearance of people, placement of objects, locations, colors, vehicles, and location of security equipment.</p><p><em>Oral communication.</em> The candidate must be able to respond in detail when relaying and explaining the facts of a situation. The candidate must also be able to delegate duties to a third party using clear directions.  </p><p><em>Written communication: </em>The candidate must be able to write a report using correct grammar and vocabulary. An excellent memory is needed to write a complete report. Also, the candidate must be computer literate to produce the report.</p><p>During the interview process, we determine if the candidate has the qualifications listed above. We evaluate the ability to give directions properly to a third party. Observation skills are also evaluated. Reporting skills are tested by having the candidate read and summarize a paragraph using a computer.</p><p><strong>Introduction to private surveillance. </strong>A candidate who passes the initial interview process is invited to attend an eight-hour training presentation the next day. This introduction exposes the candidate to the basic requirements of private security. Among the topics addressed are the expectations of a security officer, the organizational mission, legal aspects, visitor management, keys and locks, and guard tours.</p><p>After the presentation, the candidate undergoes a test, which requires 17 points to pass. If successful, the candidate is invited to come the following day to read the operations manual. </p><p><strong>Operations manual. </strong>This next step is important. We determined that it requires five business days to read, analyze, and understand the school's operations manual. We administer an evaluation at the end of each day to determine whether the candidate has understood the reading for the day. This helps to clarify questions or misunderstandings the candidate may have. If the candidate does not reach the minimum score during the first evaluation, the average of the first and second tests must be a passing score. Candidates who do not receive the required score are no longer considered, but those who pass the evaluation are invited to the induction program.</p><p><strong>Induction program. </strong>This phase of our program provides detailed descriptions of the jobs to be performed. Candidates learn that they will rotate throughout the facility and understand that there are multiple and varying tasks at each location. They receive on-the-job exposure to the work by staying at our institution during four day shifts and two night shifts.</p><p>The candidate is evaluated each day, and the minimum passing grade is 17 out of 20 points. Once again, candidates who do not receive a passing grade will no longer be considered for a position.</p><p><strong>Final evaluation. </strong>After passing the induction program, the candidate will meet with the security manager for the final assessment. This assessment includes topics such as employee identification, addresses of various locations, location of safety equipment, knowledge of the operations manual, recognition of patrol routes, and disciplinary code.</p><p><strong>Assignment to a guard group. </strong>Candidates who advance through the final evaluation receive the rank of Officer I and are assigned to a regular working group. Together with the supervisor, the officer will put into practice all theoretical and practical knowledge achieved through training. The officer will work as an auxiliary for 90 days and will perform day-shift and night-shift tasks in conjunction with the assigned group. </p><p>During this trial period, the officer will be guided and instructed by the supervisor regarding the responsibilities of the log book; closing and opening of facilities; operation of lighting; vehicle fleets; entry and exit of students; entrance of drivers, chauffeurs, and caregivers; Escuela Campo Alegre staff, contractors, tutors, substitutes, trainers, and frequent visitors; entry and exit materials; fire alarm system; evacuation drill; and many other activities. </p><p><strong>Completing the probationary period</strong>. Once Officer I completes the probationary period, we administer an evaluation to demonstrate readiness to assume multiple responsibilities. If the officer does not pass the evaluation, an additional 15 days as an auxiliary allows for more instruction, followed by another evaluation. When this evaluation is passed, the individual is promoted to Officer II.</p><p><strong>Certification as Loss Prevention and Control Analyst. </strong>An Officer II will work for nine continuous months at the new job, demonstrating knowledge of establishing priorities, situation analysis, decision making, safety, conflict management, investigations, and first aid. Depending on performance and the results of monthly assessments, it can be determined that the officer has a clear understanding of what constitutes the work of the supervisor. The officer is now eligible to be certified as an LPCA. A further evaluation involves a series of cases and situations and requires a passing score to become a certified LPCA.</p><p>Out of 120 people who apply for a position as an LPCA, only about 10 successfully reach this point.</p><p><strong>EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT</strong></p><p><strong>Training updates. </strong>In our organization, we believe that providing continuous training enhances the performance of each member of the group. Daily training is provided to each member of the guard force for 15 minutes prior to the day shift and the night shift. This training is different every day and covers more than 40 areas related to the fulfillment of security tasks. The training aims to strengthen the knowledge and ability to perform required tasks.</p><p><strong>Daily evaluations. </strong>From the first moment the candidate joins our ranks, we stress the importance of maintaining our organization with a spirit of healthy competition within the groups. This interest and enthusiasm in our organization fosters respect, pride, and knowledge about the organization.</p><p>The daily evaluation is a practical application that consists of the exchange of files and questions that the coordinator of vigilance presents to each member of the group. Officers must demonstrate their ability to recognize the faces of employees, know the geographical location of any room on campus, know the exact location of the security equipment, provide detailed information of the operations manual, run the courses correctly, and honor the disciplinary code. This daily evaluation keeps officers on their toes and objectively assesses their knowledge.</p><p><strong>Monthly evaluations. </strong>At the end of each month, the scores from the daily assessments are reviewed, allowing us to determine who has been an outstanding analyst and who may need more supervision and additional training. Officers who come up short three times during the school year are reassigned to jobs outside of Escuela Campo Alegre. </p><p><strong>LPCA lectures. </strong>Each LPCA of Campo Alegre School, as part of ongoing professional development, must present a lecture about security once a year. Each 20-minute lecture is followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer session. The topic of the lecture is assigned by management. </p><p><strong>Annual research presentation. </strong>For further professional development, each LPCA at Escuela Campo Alegre must research and propose new tools, criteria, or procedures to make the job function better and more efficiently. This improves the LPCA's skills while helping management meet its objectives.</p><p><strong>Interpersonal communications with management. </strong>Once a week, an off-duty analyst will attend an hour-long meeting with management. The parties discuss topics not related to work, such as sports, hobbies, and leisure pursuits. Management gains an appreciation of the social, cultural, and familial environment of the analyst, and both participants strengthen their communication. </p><p><strong>Disciplinary court. </strong>If any officer is involved in a disciplinary action, that officer seeks a member of his group to act as his "lawyer." The lawyer will represent the officer and help to clarify the situation. Likewise, management will choose an officer to act as "prosecutor" to argue the case of the disciplinary action. This interaction allows each party a fair chance to present facts. </p><p><strong>LPCA authors. </strong>Every member of the security team is required to write an article about campus security. The article is published in our digital magazine and is shared with the Campo Alegre community, including parents, students, teachers, employees, and contractors.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the month. </strong>Each month, an officer who has successfully met all objectives is awarded LPCA of the month. The objectives include staff identification, detailed knowledge of the campus, analytical prowess with regard to the operations manual, location of safety equipment, completion of duties, and adherence to the disciplinary code. The officer must demonstrate clear concise communication and common sense.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the year. </strong>This honor is awarded to the LPCA who has received the greatest number of monthly awards.</p><p><strong>Compensation. </strong>In addition to careful training, we know that humans respond well to a good salary and benefits. They feel appreciated for a job well done. We are proud to say that our LPCAs are the best paid in the country. In addition, they receive a stipend for being a university graduate, a stipend for transportation, and bonuses for work performance. The Escuela Campo Alegre community also shows appreciation through thank you notes and personal gratitude. That goes a long way in making our team feel appreciated.</p><p><strong>RESULTS</strong></p><p>Since Escuela Campo Alegre began this program of recruitment, training, supervision, daily evaluations, and professional development of analysts, management has observed both positive and negative behaviors: distractibility, obscurity, lack of discipline, lack of confidence to perform duties, inequality when working in groups, selfishness, and lying, as well as professionalism, fairness, honesty, transparency, and overall pride in the work and the institution. </p><p>Our evaluation system contributes greatly toward a successful program. A Google Doc is available so that every person on the task force can monitor his behavior and improve in areas of operation, manual details, face recognition, geographic location on campus, security equipment location on campus and security rounds. With this information available at any time, they can self-motivate and improve. The same Google Doc can show them where they stand as far as positioning and they can see what salary increase they may expect on their next evaluation. The disciplinary system tracks all mistakes made by the analyst on duty. This provides the analyst the opportunity to correct mistakes and advance in the program.</p><p>Our turnover is very low because of our evaluation system. It not only helps those who wish to advance, but it also allows others to realize, on their own, that their job performance is too low to continue.</p><p>The analysts take pride in their work and, because they can see what other analysts are achieving, they can collaborate and ask questions of those higher achievers. There are fewer missed shifts. Because the analysts work so closely together and respect each other, they are more willing to cover for a team member.</p><p>It has been arduous work that involves a great deal of discipline, ethics and morals, teaching, and faith in what we are doing. We are proud of our successful program and will continue to refine and improve it in the future.</p><p><em>Guillermo Guevara Penso was security manager at Escuela Campo Alegre in Caracas, Venezuela, until July 2017 when he elected to seek other security related opportunities in Chile. He has more than 30 years of experience in the security field.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
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And International Drive, an 11-mile thoroughfare through the city, is home to attractions such as Universal Orlando Resort, SeaWorld Orlando, and the Orange County Convention Center, the site of ASIS International’s 62nd Annual Seminar and Exhibits this month. </p><p>Hospitality goes hand-in-hand with security in Orlando, where local businesses and attractions see a constant flow of tourists from all over the world. And at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, which hosts events ranging from Broadway shows to concerts to community education and events, a new security director is changing the culture of theater to keep performers, staff, and visitors safe.​</p><h4>The Living Room of the City</h4><p>Open since November 2014, the Dr. Phillips Center spans two blocks and is home to a 2,700-seat main stage, a 300-seat theater, and the Dr. Phillips Center Florida Hospital School of the Arts. 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He notes that it can be costly to hire off-duty police officers, who were used for traffic control before he became the security director, so he reduced the number of officers used and stationed them closer to the building. He also uses a K-9 officer, who can quickly assess a stopped or abandoned vehicle on the spot. </p><p>“When you pull into the facility, you see an Orlando Police Department K-9 officer SUV,” Savard explains. “We brought two other valet officers closer to the building, so in any given area you have at least four police cars or motorcycles that are readily available. We wanted to get them closer so it was more of a presence, a deterrent.” The exact drop-off location is constantly changing to keep people on their toes, he adds.</p><p>The Dr. Phillips Center was already using Andy Frain Services, which provides uniformed officers to patrol the center around the clock. Annette DuBose manages the contracted officers. </p><p>When he started in December, Savard says he was surprised that no bag checks were conducted. When he brought up the possibility of doing bag checks, there was some initial pushback—it’s uncommon for theater centers to perform any type of bag check. “In the performing arts world, this was a big deal,” Savard says. “You have some high-dollar clientele coming in, and not a lot of people want to be inconvenienced like that.”</p><p>When Savard worked with DuBose and her officers to implement bag checks, he said everyone was astonished at what the officers were finding. “I was actually shocked at what people want to bring in,” Savard says. “Guns, knives, bullets. I’ve got 25-plus years of being in law enforcement, and seeing what people bring in…it’s a Carole King musical! Why are you bringing your pepper spray?”</p><p>Savard acknowledges that the fact that Florida allows concealed carry makes bag checks mandatory—and tricky. As a private entity, the Dr. Phillips Center can prohibit guns, but that doesn’t stop people from trying to bring them in, he notes. The Andy Frain officers have done a great job at kindly but firmly asking patrons to take their guns back to their cars, Savard says—and hav­ing a police officer nearby helps when it comes to argumentative visitors.​</p><h4>Culture, Community, and Customer Service</h4><p>There have been more than 300 performances since the Dr. Phillips Center opened, and with two stages, the plaza, classrooms, and event spaces, there can be five or six events going on at once. </p><p>“This is definitely a soft target here in Orlando,” Savard notes. “With our planned expansion, we can have 5,000 people in here at one time. What a target—doing something in downtown Orlando to a performing arts center.”</p><p>The contract officers and off-duty police carry out the core of the security- related responsibilities, but Savard has also brought in volunteers to augment the security presence. As a nonprofit theater, the Dr. Phillips Center has a large number of “very passionate” volunteers—there are around 50 at each show, he says. </p><p>The volunteers primarily provide customer service, but Savard says he wants them to have a security mindset, as well—“the more eyes, the better.” He teaches them basic behavioral assessment techniques and trends they should look for. </p><p>“You know the guy touching his lower back, does he have a back brace on or is he trying to keep the gun in his waistband from showing?” Savard says. “Why is that person out there videotaping where people are being dropped off and parking their cars? Is it a bad guy who wants to do something?”</p><p>All 85 staffers at the Dr. Phillips Center have taken active shooter training classes, and self-defense classes are offered as well. Savard tries to stress situational awareness to all staff, whether they work in security or not. </p><p>“One of the things I really want to do is get that active shooter mindset into this environment, because this is the type of environment where it’s going to happen,” Savard explains. “It’s all over the news.”</p><p>Once a month, Savard and six other theater security directors talk on the phone about the trends and threats they are seeing, as well as the challenges with integrating security into the performing arts world. </p><p>“Nobody wanted the cops inside the building at all, because it looked too militant,” Savard says. “And then we had Paris, and things changed. With my background coming in, I said ‘Listen, people want to see the cops.’” </p><p>Beyond the challenge of changing the culture at the Dr. Phillips Center, Savard says he hopes security can become a higher priority at performing arts centers across the country. The Dr. Phillips Center is one of more than two dozen theaters that host Broadway Across America shows, and Savard invited the organization’s leaders to attend an active shooter training at the facility last month. </p><p>“There’s a culture in the performing arts that everything’s fine, and unfortu­nately we know there are bad people out there that want to do bad things to soft targets right now,” Savard says. “The whole idea is to be a little more vigilant in regards to protecting these soft targets.”</p><p>Savard says he hopes to make wanding another new norm at performing arts centers. There have already been a number of instances where a guest gets past security officers with a gun hidden under a baggy Cuban-style shirt. “I’ll hear that report of a gun in the building, and the hair stands up on the back of my neck,” Savard says. “It’s a never- ending goal to continue to get better and better every time. We’re not going to get it right every time, but hopefully the majority of the time.”</p><p>The Dr. Phillips Center is also moving forward with the construction of a new 1,700-seat acoustic theater, which will be completed within the next few years. The expansion allows the center to host three shows at one time—not including events in private rooms or on the plaza. Savard is already making plans for better video surveillance and increasing security staff once the new theater is built.</p><p>“We really try to make sure that every­body who comes into the building, whether or not they’re employed here, is a guest at the building, and we want to make sure that it’s a great experience, not only from the performance but their safety,” according to Savard. “It’s about keeping the bad guys out, but it’s also that you feel really safe once you’re in here.” </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465