Perimeter Protection

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Soft-Targets---What-Security-Professionals-Can-Learn-From-the-Manchester-Attack.aspxSoft Targets: What Security Professionals Can Learn From the Manchester AttackGP0|#21788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f;L0|#021788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f|National Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-05-24T04:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/holly-gilbert-stowell.aspx, Holly Gilbert Stowell<p><em>Michael J. Fagel is a crisis management expert with more than 30 years of experience in emergency planning and response. He has written several books and is co-author of </em>Soft Targets and Crisis Management: What Emergency Planners and Security Professionals Need to Know<em>. He is a member of the ASIS School Safety and Security Council. </em></p><p>Security Management <em>Associate Editor Holly Gilbert Stowell</em> <em>spoke to Fagel about the recent terror attack in Manchester, England, and what security professionals can do to prevent soft target attacks. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity.</em></p><p><strong>Stowell: From what we've seen over the last few months, attacks on soft targets—places of worship, study, and leisure—seem increasingly commonplace. What type of target is the Manchester Arena—a typical soft target, or some sort of hybrid with unique features? </strong></p><p><strong>Fagel: </strong>It is a typical soft target, given the fact that there are more and more security measures in place as people get closer to the venue. It's a pretty common occurrence in stadiums, to have nonsecure areas where people are approaching the building. Just think of an airport, think of a baggage claim, think of queuing up before you get in the airport. Everybody's milling about in these commons spaces before they go through security. </p><p><strong>Stowell: The Manchester attacker detonated a suicide bomb on the perimeter of the event as people were filing out of the concert. Do you think the perimeter is actually a bigger concern for a soft target than inside the venue itself? </strong></p><p><strong></strong><strong></strong><strong></strong><strong></strong><strong></strong><strong></strong><strong>Fagel:</strong>I think they're equally as critical. The perimeter is of equal significance and of equal danger as inside, because nobody knows who's walking about the perimeter and the nonsecure area. A backpack looks innocuous, a lunchbox, a briefcase, a shopping bag—any one of those things would be very common in a place of commerce and wouldn't look out of the ordinary. So anybody could be wandering with that object, and you would never know that they were engaging in malicious activity. </p><p><strong>Stowell: Are U.S. arenas, and other facilities similar to the Manchester Arena in the United States, now vulnerable to attack? If so, in what ways? </strong></p><p><strong>Fagel: </strong>I don't want to be an alarmist, I want to be a realist. Nothing is invulnerable to this type of attack. I've worked in the Middle East and all over the world. Our society right now is not prepared for this type of event. I've been training police officers, firefighters, and rescue personnel for the last 20 years, and we are continually striving to be better than we are, but the bad guys learn from each incident. Every time something occurs, they will get better, and if you look at the terrorist propaganda, there are explicit instructions on how to carry out these sort of events. These elements are cookbooks for the bad guys. </p><p>Terrorists take advantage of our openness, of our fairness, and our way of life, which they don't like for whatever reason. They use that against us. Do we want to change that? No. We're built on freedoms, but we have to be cautious that the bad guys are learning minute by minute—and nothing is off limits now. </p><p><strong>Stowell: Speaking of limits, this was an attack on a venue containing children and teenagers. Do we have a moral boundary in our minds that causes us to treat security differently for events concerning younger people? </strong></p><p><strong>Fagel: </strong>Have the bad guys crossed a line? The answer is yes. Have they done something that is heinous? Yes. I worked the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 and carried out rescue and recovery during the attacks. I thought that was the worst thing I had ever seen, and having been a medic, firefighter, and police officer for many years, and seeing infants killed—I thought that crossed a line. </p><p>But bad guys now targeting the concert with a younger crowd, people as young as eight years old, to me that crosses every moral boundary. After September 11, people were really vigilant about security for the first few months, but then they started to get more lax. You can never let your guard down. As soon as you start to relax and think the threat is over with, the bad guys are watching our behaviors and will seize ​on that opportunity. They're watching our security postures. They're watching how we react to things. </p><p><strong>Stowell: What lessons can security professionals take away from this attack to help increase security at soft target venues? </strong></p><p><strong>Fagel: </strong>Think of soft targets like a bullseye with rings around it. Picture an airport where security needs to start prior to the secure area. If the airport is the bullseye, security needs to start in the parking lot, baggage delivery, at ticket counters. It needs to start way before you approach the secure zone, so that security is the culture of the entire area. </p><p>You have layers of defense, layers that protect you as you move closer and closer to the soft target in the middle. Let's say in an office building there's a security server for the Internet. If that's the bullseye—I have to prevent people from ever getting there. And an office​ worker is the softest target with Internet access and passwords. It's the concept and culture of hardening people, and hardening your venues so that you're more aware, and preventing something before it even gets close to your bullseye. </p><p>There must be a personal awareness. It's not somebody else's job, it's our responsibility as alert citizens to be cognizant of our surroundings, see something say something. If it doesn't look right, it probably isn't right. </p><p>Finally, the solution is having an attitude and an awareness for things that may be out of place. I'm not talking about profiling people, I'm talking about profiling behaviors and actions. The Virginia Tech shooter, [Seung-Hui​] Cho, was at the gun range, shooting holes in paper targets face down. That's a behavior. Omar Mateen wanted to buy body armor in Florida before carrying out the Pulse Nightclub massacre. Is the person acquiring weaponry? Are they buying precursory devices and material? Are they buying powder for explosives? Are they buying ammunition? Are they taking shotgun shells apart? Are they asking weird questions at the gun range, the gun shop, or the fireworks store? </p><p>Use commonly available tools and information to develop your intelligence quotient and your ability to see what may be happening. It's all about awareness. ​</p>

Perimeter Protection

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Soft-Targets---What-Security-Professionals-Can-Learn-From-the-Manchester-Attack.aspx2017-05-24T04:00:00ZSoft Targets: What Security Professionals Can Learn From the Manchester Attack
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Workplace-Safety.aspx2016-09-26T04:00:00ZBook Review: Workplace Safety
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/School-Security-Trends.aspx2016-09-01T04:00:00ZSchool Security Trends
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Seminar-Sneak-Peek---Fire-and-Security-Must-Be-Allies.aspx2016-07-15T04:00:00ZSeminar Sneak Peek: Fire and Security Must Be Allies
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Organizations-Ask-Pokemon-Go-Users-To-Refrain-From-Catching-Them-All.aspx2016-07-13T04:00:00ZOrganizations Ask Pokémon Go Users To Refrain From Catching Them All
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Religions-Institutions.aspx2016-06-01T04:00:00ZBook Review: Keeping Religious Institutions Secure
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Protection-on-Display.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZProtection on Display
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cyber-Pulls-the-Plug.aspx2016-05-01T04:00:00ZCyber Pulls the Plug
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Q-and-A---Soft-Targets.aspx2016-04-01T04:00:00ZQ&A: Soft Targets
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Security-Beyond-Sunday.aspx2016-04-01T04:00:00ZSecurity Beyond Sunday
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Private-School-Public-Protection.aspx2015-09-17T04:00:00ZPrivate School, Public Protection

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Drafting-a-Blueprint-for-Security.aspxDrafting a Blueprint for Security<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">Immediately upon concluding the construction of a secure-asset facility 10 years ago, project management hit a major setback: the security manager. Instead of working with the design team and project manager in the initial phases of the project, the security manager waited until the new facility was already erected to determine where security cameras needed to be placed.</span></p><p>“All of a sudden, we’re moving cameras and changing openings and sleeves in the wall for wiring because [the security manager] had difficulty reading blueprints,” says Rick Lavelle, PSP, principal architect and owner of Creador Architecture, of the experience. Instead of admitting that he had this difficulty, the security manager waited until he could see the facility three-dimensionally, causing delays and increasing project costs.</p><p>“Then he’d step in and really do his job that would have been helpful to have earlier in the process,” Lavelle explains.</p><p>To help prevent security professionals from becoming similar setbacks in construction projects, Security Management sat down with Lavelle; Mark Schreiber, CPP, principal consultant for Safeguards Consulting and chair of the ASIS International Security Architecture and Engineering Council; Rene Rieder, Jr., CPP, PSP, associate principal at Ove Arup & Partners; and J. Kelly Stewart, managing director and CEO of Newcastle Consulting, for their tips on navigating the document and project management process.​</p><h4>1. Know Your Team</h4><p>Like almost any project that involves numerous people, it’s crucial to understand that a construction project is a team effort that requires team members to understand the process and communicate with each other.</p><p>“We emphasize...know who your team is, align with your team, and communicate with your team as much as possible because that will support a central project,” Schreiber explains. </p><p>And this team can be quite large, including top executives at the company, the project manager, the facility operations manager, the facility engineer, the security manager, security consultants, architects and designers, engineers, and general consultants—just to name a few. The council encourages team members to construct a simple diagram to help keep track of everyone.</p><p>While it may take a while, identifying the team and communicating with them helps ensure that security is included in construction project discussions from the very beginning—something that doesn’t always happen automatically. </p><p>“I was fairly surprised to learn early on in one of [the first classes I taught] that most of the project is completed—and sometimes is built—when the security manager gets a roll of drawings and they say, ‘Give us a security plan,’” Lavelle says.  </p><p>To change this, he explains that security needs to “know the relationships within their own companies that they need to develop so that doesn’t happen to them, [and that they make sure] they’re brought in earlier in the process. That leads to a much more successful implementation of anybody’s security plan.”</p><p>Lavelle also recommends that security leads work with the IT department during the project. “Getting IT, security, and the facilities people together on one team and having them all have the same direction, you’ll probably have the most effective security program that’s possible,” he explains.​</p><h4>2. Know Your Goals</h4><p>A construction project is rarely initiated just to meet a security need. It’s typically instigated to meet some other operational need, such as to increase manufacturing capacity. So the security department must ensure that its goals for the project—whether it’s introducing a new CCTV system or implementing its existing access control system—align with the overarching goals for the new facility.</p><p>“Just because they now have been given the green light to do an improvement for their facility doesn’t mean that they can go in and put every possible technology, every possible countermeasure that they’ve been dreaming about for years in,” Schreiber says. “They have to work within the goals of that project.”</p><p>This means that once the goals for the facility are outlined, the security department needs to specify its own project goals, providing a way to measure those goals, ensuring that goals are attainable and relevant to the overall project, identifying the starting functional requirements, and making sure they meet time and budgetary constraints. In the case of a new manufacturing plant, for example, CCTV might be attractive to other departments as well, such as quality management or logistics, creating a stronger case for the technology and getting these departments to share the expense.</p><p>By going through this process, security professionals can make sure that their goals are aligned with the overall project goals, enabling them to have success, Schreiber adds. “Whereas the more they stray away, they’re going to essentially be spinning their wheels, wasting effort, and possibly jeopardizing credibility.”​</p><h4>3. Know Your Documents</h4><p>For most security professionals, being part of a construction project is not routine. Nor is the process of reading project manuals, floor plans, elevations, and other drawing plans. But understanding what these documents are and how they come together to represent a construction project is key to the success of the project “because if the documents are correct, then you have a sound project for development,” Stewart says.</p><p>That’s because the documents work together as a guide detailing the design of the project, the technology that will be installed, and where exactly those installations will take place in the final construction. </p><p>And while discussing changes or where technology should be installed in the final project, security directors can communicate with design professionals and architects—regardless of their drawing skills, Lavelle adds. A quick visual representation of the camera and access control location can be helpful. </p><p>While these discussions are taking place, it’s important to document changes throughout the process and review them with the project team after each step is completed. “It’s arduous, but it’s a necessary evil because if you skip a step, you’ll forget something or something will fall through the cracks,” Stewart explains.</p><p>After the construction project is completed, it’s important to continue to keep track of its documentation and make sure it’s up to date so it reflects the current facility. In one case, Stewart took over as a director of security for a company that hadn’t documented the many changes to its system over the years. </p><p>“I actually had to bring in a security consultant and architect to figure out where all the stuff was,” he says. “There were drawings that were going back 20 years, which had nothing to do with the current system.”​</p><h4>4. Know Your Chain of Command</h4><p>In an ideal world, once the initial security goals for the project are outlined and plans are designed to implement them, nothing would change. “But truthfully, it never works that way,” Lavelle says. And when changes or problems occur, it’s critical to know who in the project team you need to talk to about implementing a solution. </p><p>As the project goes further along, you spend less time with the design team and more time with the general contractor, Lavelle explains. This means that security directors need to understand the roles and responsibilities of those involved in the project, and who they need to speak to about changes throughout the process.</p><p>For instance, some construction projects can take more than 18 months to complete, and during that time technology may change or new company policies may be implemented. The security needs for the project may shift, but it might not be appropriate to seek executive approval for the change.</p><p>“Going back to the CEO or the CFO who approved the project costs in the beginning may not be appropriate if you’re halfway through construction,” Lavelle says. Instead, security directors will likely need to go to the facility or project manager, or even their direct supervisor, to have the changes approved.</p><p>Most security professionals have never been involved in a construction project. For them, this is a “once in their career” experience, Rieder says. Following the steps outlined above can help smooth the way. However, if a project seems overwhelming security professionals need to reach out to peers or experts for help and advice.</p><p><em>​The Security Architecture and Engineering Council is sponsoring an educational session on the <a href="https://www.asisonline.org/Education-Events/Education-Programs/Classroom/Pages/Security-Document-and-Project-Management-Process.aspx" target="_blank">security document and project management process​</a> in October.</em><br></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Workplace-Safety.aspxBook Review: Workplace Safety<p>Butterworth-Heinema​nn; Elsevier.com; 180 pages; $49.95.</p><p>The threat of workplace violence is a continuous issue affecting the well-being of the American workforce. Horrific reports and images of violent acts in the workplace appear far too often in the media, disrupting the safety, well-being, and productivity of the general public. </p><p>In an attempt to help businesses and organizations deter or deflect these violent acts, Randall W. Ferris and Daniel Murphy authored <em>Workplace Safety: Establishing an Effective Violence Prevention Program. </em>This is a well-intended book designed to help organizations with the development of policies and practices to prevent violence in the workplace. The book offers information on applicable topics, including relevant definitions, justifications for workplace violence procedures, explanations of various types of violence, environmental causes, and possible motives behind the attacks, as well as details for creating and implementing methods to prevent violent incidents. The authors draw from the guidelines presented in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s standards for the prevention of workplace violence as their primary source of creditable information.</p><p>The book reads more like a how-to manual than a professional publication. The chapters are consistently formatted with a motivational quote, chapter contents, an abstract, and applicable key words. The chapters include various personal experiences from the authors, fictitious scenarios, and bulleted or numerical lists pertaining to the chapter’s content. Further diluting the professionalism is the use of common or slang terms in text that is often brash or casual. </p><p>There is value here for some audiences. For organizations that have not developed procedures to deter or respond to violent incidents in the workplace and those that do not understand the concept of these issues, this could be a helpful guide. Those working in human resources or facility management and individuals who are new to security management can gain some useful information. Also, managers desiring to completely redesign or reevaluate their workplace violence policies might use this book as a starting point. However, it should be viewed as a supplemental publication and not a primary source. Workplace Safety: Establishing an Effective Violence Prevention Program will not impress the educated or experienced reader or introduce new concepts that have not been previously explored. </p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Joseph Jaksa, Ph.D., CPP, </strong>is an associate professor of criminal justice at Michigan’s Saginaw Valley State University. He is a member of ASIS International and the Saginaw Valley Chapter of ASIS.  </em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Protection-on-Display.aspxProtection on Display<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">While driving from Toledo, Ohio, to New York City in November of 2006, the two drivers of an art transport truck stopped for the night in Pennsylvania at a Howard Johnson Hotel. They parked the truck in an unlit parking lot adjacent to the hotel, out of sight of the hotel’s rooms and the main office.</span></p><p>In the morning, when the drivers returned to the truck, they found the locks on the truck broken and the painting inside, Goya’s Children with Cart, valued at $1.1 million, gone. </p><p>The authorities were notified and an extensive publicity campaign was launched to locate the painting. The Guggenheim Museum, which had planned to display the painting in its upcoming exhibition Spanish Painting from El Greco to Picasso: Time, Truth, and History, released a joint statement with the painting’s home museum, The Art Museum of Toledo. </p><p>The two museums said the painting would be “virtually impossible to sell and therefore has no value on the open market,” in an effort to prevent a clandestine sale. They also announced that the painting’s insurers were offering a reward of $50,000 for any information leading to the recovery of the painting.</p><p>The strategy worked, and the FBI received a tip which led to the recovery of the painting less than two weeks later. It was in “good condition” and appeared to “be unharmed,” the FBI said in a press release announcing the Goya’s recovery.</p><p>That tip came from Steven Lee Olson, 49, who reported that he discovered the painting in his basement. Olson was a self-employed truck driver, and was later charged with stealing the painting himself. </p><p>Olson contacted the FBI, but not for the reward money. “I really wanted to get rid of it,” he told U.S. District Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh in a court proceeding. After stealing the painting with his neighbor, “they realized it was more than they could handle,” Olson’s attorney, Joe Ferrante, said to the AP. </p><p>The two men pleaded guilty to conspiring to steal the painting. Olson, who had a criminal record, was sentenced to five years in prison for his crime and his neighbor, Roman Szurko, received one year and a day.</p><p>While the painting was successfully recovered and eventually returned to Toledo where it’s displayed today, the theft brought new awareness to the security concerns associated with museum special exhibitions.​</p><h4>Planning</h4><p>Located in the middle of America in Bentonville, Arkansas, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is well aware of the challenges that come with transporting art to and from various museums. </p><p>The museum, which opened in 2011, has a collection that spans five centuries of American art ranging from the Colonial era to the current day. Its masterpieces include Asher B. Durand’s Kindred Spirits, Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter, and Andy Warhol’s Dolly Parton—to name a few. </p><p>In addition to its vast collection, the museum also hosts a wide variety of special exhibitions each year. Planning for these exhibitions starts years in advance, says Niki Ciccotelli Stewart, Crystal Bridges’ chief engagement officer. </p><p>“Right now we have an idea for our large exhibition space of what we’re doing through 2018,” she explains. “We’re green-lighted through 2017 with some yellow lights in late 2017, 2018, and 2019.”</p><p>Crystal Bridges receives a variety of proposals for special exhibitions, which are originally looked over by the curatorial and exhibitions teams to determine what value the exhibition would have for visitors, whether the content is appropriate, and whether the exhibition fits the larger arc of the stories the museum wants to tell with its programs.</p><p>“We’re telling stories about the founding of America,” Stewart says. And since Crystal Bridges is a relatively young museum, it has to consider what its visitors will want to see—such as American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell, which drew thousands of visitors to see 50 original paintings and 323 Saturday Evening Post covers by the artist.</p><p>Once the curators and exhibitions team have decided that an exhibition is a good option for the museum, they start discussing the viability of the exhibition itself—the size of the art, the kind of climate it will need, and the security conditions needed to display it.</p><p>This is when Director of Security Geoff Goodrich is brought into the discussion to review the initial draft of what requirements Crystal Bridges will have to meet in order to host the exhibition. Goodrich analyzes the contract not just to see what the security requirements are, but what the impacts will be on the museum’s facility, how the exhibition will be shipped, and the security requirements necessary, such as the number of physical security officers and cameras in the gallery.</p><p>One of the most important parts of the process is determining how many security officers need to be present in the exhibition gallery based on the layout of the gallery and how the artwork will be presented. For instance, certain exhibitions make visitors want to touch the artwork. These exhibitions might merit more security officers.</p><p>“We have a folk art exhibition coming up later this year, and it’s a very touchy-feely exhibition,” Goodrich says. “It’s folk art from years past and now, so for some people it’s like going to a giant craft show. And when they go to a craft show, they get to touch everything. But this is antique stuff…and whether it’s something handmade or a quilt hanging on a wall, people want to have that sense of touching.”</p><p>This means he’ll have more staff patrolling in the gallery than he would for another exhibition coming to Crystal Bridges that features photography and video. </p><p>Additionally, Goodrich will consider what level of explanation an exhibition might require. Security staff are often the most visible museum staff, so visitors may look to them to explain portions of an exhibition.</p><p>“Knowing that early on allows me to plan my staffing, if I need to hire some additional staff members or shift people around—it gives us a plan to be able to get in on a budget process a year early,” he explains.</p><p>After Goodrich has an idea of how many security officers will need to be on staff for the exhibition, the exhibits designer and curatorial department begin planning how to display the artwork itself.</p><p>They come up with an initial plan and then sit down with Goodrich to look at the proposed layout of the exhibition to identify any issues, such as safety from the fire marshal’s standpoint. “As we all know, 90 percent of the time there’s always something,” Goodrich says. </p><p>To help mitigate this problem, Crystal Bridges has made a collaborative effort to work with the local fire department to bring in the fire marshal for regular walk-throughs throughout the planning process.</p><p>“Not just to make sure it’s up to code, but also to decide this is a smart thing to do,” Goodrich says. “Even though it does meet code, is it smart? Is this the wise way to do this?”</p><p>Sometimes this results in great advice from the fire marshal on small changes that can be made to ensure that the exhibition is displaying the art in a secure manner that also creates a safe environment for visitors.</p><p>For instance, the fire marshal may walk through the exhibition space with Goodrich and other facilities staff and recommend adding another exit to the layout. The additional exit may not be necessary for the space to be code compliant, but would provide easier access out of the exhibition space in the event of an emergency.</p><p>During this process, Goodrich also looks at the layout of the exhibition gallery to determine “pinch-point areas,” where a group of people might gather in front of one painting and create a bottleneck for people to go around. </p><p>If this is the case, and it will interrupt the traffic flow of the gallery, Goodrich can work with the exhibition team to change the layout to reduce congestion—keeping the art safe while also improving visitors’ experience.</p><p>After determining the design of the exhibition—from the wall placement to the entrance and exit—Crystal Bridges then looks at how to place security cameras throughout the gallery and how lighting will impact those cameras. The museum just upgraded the cameras in its special exhibition space so they are all digital and have infrared capabilities. </p><p>“Which means they can see in the dark so we can do lower light levels and still have excellent video quality,” Goodrich says.  </p><p>At this point, the planning phase is complete and Crystal Bridges just has to wait for the exhibition itself to arrive—one of the most difficult aspects of the process.</p><p>“It’s hard to get everything here, easily, because of where we’re located,” Goodrich explains, as the museum sits in the bottom of an Ozark ravine in a relatively rural area. “So most things come to us over land.”​</p><h4>Transporting</h4><p>In the Goya theft case, the truck drivers transporting the painting parked their truck and left it unattended, overnight, in the parking lot. For many security professionals, that scenario is unimaginable if not panic-inducing. </p><p>Fortunately, not all art handlers operate that way. Instead, many require that art shipments be monitored from pick-up to drop-off without overnight stops in between. One company that provides this service in the United States and Canada is FedEx Custom Critical, a freight carrier under the FedEx umbrella.</p><p>As part of Custom Critical, FedEx has a White Glove Services Department that “handles anything that is special care,” says Carl Kiser, operations manager for the department. </p><p>The department has an internal staff that handles customer service and makes the arrangements for pick-up and delivery of art work for clients.</p><p>The drivers, however, are contracted out and must pass a background check before being hired for the department. Drivers pick up shipments, transport them to their destination, and drop them off. They do not, however, pack or unpack artwork.</p><p>As part of this contract service, clients can request certain requirements through White Glove Services, including temperature controlled trucks and single shipment on a single truck.</p><p>That “in and of itself is a security measure because there are no unnecessary stops along the route,” Kiser says. “The freight goes from the point of origin straight through to delivery, if that’s what the art customer wants.”</p><p>Drivers—who often operate in teams for art shipments—are also required to monitor the freight at all times so the truck is never left unattended. “That’s critical in making sure that nothing happens to that shipment,” Kiser says.</p><p>As an added layer of security, when a driver is contracted to pick up a shipment, the department sends the museum or client a Positive Driver Identification (PDI). The PDI contains photos of the drivers that are approved to pick up the shipment, ensuring that the driver who shows up to pick up the shipment is not an imposter.</p><p>The teams of drivers work together, trading off driving duties while one sleeps in the cab of the truck on what are typically long drives across the United States or into Canada. The department will also work with clients who want to send a courier or an escort vehicle with the shipment—a common practice in the art world.</p><p>If drivers need to stop, or there’s a delay in when a museum can unload a shipment, they have the option to use one of FedEx’s freight locations to secure the truck overnight in a gated, locked facility. </p><p>To ensure that trucks are traveling on the approved route and on schedule, the White Glove Services Department monitors the progress of trucks once a shipment is picked up by using a GPS tracking system. </p><p>“We have the system set up to send back a service failure notification if the truck is running more than 15 minutes behind the allotted schedule,” Kiser says. “And then our agents would investigate to find out what’s going on, and then notify the customers so they’re aware of the status of that load throughout the entire shipment.”</p><p>If there are no service failures en route, the department would notify the customer when the shipment arrived at its destination, had been signed for, and delivered. </p><p>However, if there is a problem, the department has Qualcomm wireless communication devices in each of its trucks, which use a satellite connection to send messages back and forth to the truck from the department’s headquarters.</p><p>“So if there is a scenario that occurs, we have tracking on that truck and we also have the ability for the contractor or driver to reach out to us to let us know that something’s taken place,” Kiser says. “Or they call us directly. </p><p>We are a 24/7 facility that can respond to a situation at any time of the day <span style="line-height:1.5em;">or night.”</span></p><p>These situations can include anything from a traffic jam to a storm that could be slowing or stopping the truck altogether. If it’s an emergency situation, such as a truck getting into an accident, the department has escalation procedures in place to alert Kiser and FedEx’s security group to respond. It can also alert the authorities if a law enforcement response is necessary.</p><p>For especially sensitive shipments, the department also offers a device, called SenseAware, that can be placed inside the shipment itself to provide tracking information directly to <span style="line-height:1.5em;">the client. ​</span></p><h4>Exhibiting</h4><p>Once Crystal Bridges knows the arrival date for an exhibition, its exterior security team will assist with the delivery—via truck—entering its receiving area, which is designed to allow a 52-foot truck with a cab to enter and then be sealed off with a gate.</p><p>“That way we have a secure area for them to offload the art,” Goodrich says. “Once the truck is here, then we have a process in place where our receiving clerk will shut down the whole dock area.”</p><p>The clerk will send out an e-mail and a radio alert that the receiving dock area is closed, except to essential personnel who are involved in offloading the truck. Signage is posted in the museum’s elevators so staff are aware of the closure, and only approved personnel using access cards will be allowed into the receiving area.</p><p> Based on the contract with the lending institution, additional security measures might also be required once the exhibition reaches Crystal Bridges, such as having security officers present in the gallery while the artwork is being installed. </p><p>However, with the improvement of access control capabilities at museums, many lending institutions are not requiring this, Goodrich says. </p><p>“Only those people who are directly related to the exhibit can enter, and they only enter through one designated door to get into the gallery space to work,” he explains. “So that limits the need to have a physical body there.”</p><p>Goodrich also places temporary cameras in the gallery while exhibitions are being installed in case a worker is injured while installation is taking place. “If somebody gets hurt, we still have video of the activity in the space for our records,” he says.”</p><p>While installation is taking place, Stewart works with Goodrich to educate security staff about the exhibition so they can answer questions and engage with visitors. Stewart will meet with security staff on a Wednesday when Goodrich has created a standard time for different departments to come in and brief the security team on what they’re doing. </p><p>For her brief, Stewart provides security staff with a program of what exhibitions are coming up and printouts of information about the exhibition, such as what pieces of art will be included and who the artists are.</p><p>After the exhibition opens, Stewart goes back for another Wednesday briefing to discuss what security staff are seeing in the gallery—how people are moving through the gallery, what kinds of questions staff are being asked, and what behaviors they’re seeing.</p><p>For instance, when the Rockwell exhibition was at Crystal Bridges, 120,000 people came through the museum to see it. Managing the crowds became a major challenge, and security staff had to work closely with the exhibitions team to manage the flow of people to prevent overcrowding in the gallery.</p><p>Another challenge came with Crystal Bridges’ State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now exhibition, which featured 102 different artists from across the country and took over the entire footprint of the museum. </p><p>“We had art on the pond, art in the stairwells, art in the hallways, so it was very engaging and textured,” Stewart says. “Everyone wanted to touch the art, but that wasn’t allowed, so it created an operational challenge for staff.”</p><p>Crystal Bridges met this challenge by deploying more security staff to the galleries, so they could engage with visitors, answer questions, and enforce the no-touching rule. </p><p>“We really had to be ready for lots and lots of questions from visitors, and our security team was energized rather than annoyed by that,” Stewart adds.</p><p>With 35 special exhibitions under its belt and more slated for the rest of 2016, Crystal Bridges is now sending its own special exhibition to other institutions. State of the Art made its first stop at the Minneapolis Institute of Art in February and will stay there until the end of this month, when it will travel to Telfair Museums in Savannah, Georgia.</p><p>And the trucks transporting it won’t be making any unattended overnight stops along the way.  </p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465