Intrusion & Access Control

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Yale-Opens-Doors.aspxYale Opens DoorsGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652016-12-01T05:00:00Zhttps://adminsm.asisonline.org/pages/holly-gilbert-stowell.aspx, Holly Gilbert Stowell<p>​When an anonymous person phoned in an active shooter threat to Yale University in November 2013, the central campus in New Haven, Connecticut, went into lockdown mode, and everyone was ordered to shelter in place. </p><p>The FBI and several other law enforcement agencies responded to the situation. No gunman was ever located, but Ronnell Higgins, the university’s chief of police and director of public safety, says the incident provided an opportunity for the campus to evaluate its overall safety and security posture. </p><p>“We looked at what happened versus what we want to happen in the future and, by injecting different technology and processes in, how we will improve the narrative if something similar occurs again,” Higgins says. </p><p>Active shooters are a rare occurrence at any university, including Yale, but there are a number of daily challenges the educational institution faces because it’s home to 11,000 students and a 3,200-member faculty.</p><p>“The Yale University campus is truly woven into the tapestry of the city of New Haven,” he notes, adding that there is a balance between creating a welcoming, open environment and providing security. “We don’t want to turn the place into a fortress, but we have to be ever so cognizant of the environment and our obligation to provide safety.” </p><p>While the public safety department had significantly reduced one of its biggest problems—larceny—over the last five years, Higgins says that campus law enforcement wanted to do more to not only reduce crime, but improve overall efficiencies when it came to access control. </p><p>After the active shooter threat, the vendor for Yale’s access control system began phasing out its technology. So, working with its dedicated in-house IT team, the public safety department decided on three major goals to address in updating the access control system. </p><p>They were: have a single point from which to manage access control; increase security around the movement of students, employees, and visitors; and increase overall efficiencies, including mobilizing credentials and streamlining lockdown procedures.</p><p>To determine which access control technology was most appropriate for Yale, the university hired an outside consultant to evaluate proposals, says Dave Boyd, director of information technology for the public safety department. </p><p>The university interviewed the top vendors and, in the end, chose AMAG’s Symmetry SR Solution. Implementation began in July 2014 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017; currently, more than two-thirds of the university’s buildings have been upgraded.  </p><p>The AMAG solution appealed to Yale for several reasons, including the fact that installers would not have to rip out and replace existing hardware. Instead, Symmetry uses the university’s existing wiring infrastructure, allowing it to keep the door card readers installed around its 450 buildings. </p><p>“That was one of the big selling points, because we have some buildings here that are over 200 years old with three-foot stone walls,” Boyd says. “So not having to do a rip and replace saved us millions of dollars.”</p><p>AMAG Symmetry also allows the university to manage access control for all buildings from a single interface. Eventually, Boyd says, Yale can tie in video and alarms to the system, as well as assign threat levels that will lock down certain parts of campus in the event of an incident. </p><p>AMAG Technology’s professional services team wrote an interface to Yale’s internal database to pull data into Symmetry from the university’s access control database. While Yale had to replace a computer board component within all of its existing door readers, students and faculty kept the same cards–microchips inside them were updated electronically. The credentials the faculty and students use to open the door are the same cards they use for identification, dining, and vending. </p><p>“We didn’t have to change the cards—the end users don’t even know this project is happening, just the building managers,” Boyd says.</p><p>Boyd adds that throughout the installation process, card holders would occasionally find that they did not have proper access levels after the switchover. To remedy this, the IT team went building by building to make sure the right people had access to the right places by comparing its old access control database spreadsheets to the new system. </p><p>AMAG also sent a dedicated engineer to remain on site during the first two years of the installation process. “So even issues that looked like they could have been bigger were resolved very quickly because he was on site,” Boyd adds.</p><p>Having its own public safety IT team allows Yale to tailor its technological solutions to the security needs of the campus, Higgins says. </p><p>“When Dave [Boyd] and his team are a part of our meetings, even if it doesn’t have anything to do with IT at the time, they’re thinking about how they can support us through technology, through the software, through systems like AMAG,” Higgins explains. </p><p>Boyd echoes the partnership’s effectiveness. “Most of the time we’ll sit back and just listen and try to find their pain points. Then we try to come up with technology solutions to take care of those pain points.” </p><p>He adds that the Symmetry Threat Level Manager will be activated at the end of the installation, providing even more security on campus. This feature can remotely lock down certain buildings based on the given emergency. With this feature, “it’s the push of a button” to lock down the campus, Boyd says.  </p><p>Higgins emphasizes that access control is a cornerstone for responding to any emergency. “Responding agencies may not be familiar with our architecture or the layout,” he says. “So when we think about access control…it’s incumbent on us to think about access control in emergency situations for people who aren’t familiar with our campus.” ​</p>

Intrusion & Access Control

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Yale-Opens-Doors.aspx2016-12-01T05:00:00ZYale Opens Doors
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Sounding-the-Alarm-at-Lone-Star.aspx2016-08-01T04:00:00ZSounding the Alarm at Lone Star
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cannabis-Cash.aspx2016-07-01T04:00:00ZQ&A: Cannabis Cash
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/What-the-Pulse-Nightclub-Attack-Means-for-Soft-Target-Security.aspx2016-06-14T04:00:00ZWhat the Pulse Nightclub Attack Means for soft Target Security
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Dearth-of-Gun-Data.aspx2016-04-01T04:00:00ZA Dearth of Gun Data
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/When-Simulation-Means-Survival.aspx2016-04-01T04:00:00ZWhen Simulation Means Survival
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review--The-Alarm-Science-Manual.aspx2016-02-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: The Alarm Science Manual
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Campus-ID-Gets-a-Makeover.aspx2015-11-30T05:00:00ZCampus ID Gets a Makeover
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Access-Under-Control.aspx2015-08-10T04:00:00ZAccess Under Control
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Washington-Navy-Yard-On-Lockdown-After-Reports-of-Shooter.aspx2015-07-02T04:00:00ZWashington Navy Yard On Lockdown After Reports of Shooter
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Airports-Scrutinize-Employees.aspx2015-06-23T04:00:00ZAirports Scrutinize Employees
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Driving-Toward-Disaster.aspx2015-06-15T04:00:00ZDriving Toward Disaster
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/10-Factors-to-Consider-in-Designing-Vehicle-Checkpoints.aspx2015-05-28T04:00:00Z10 Factors to Consider in Designing Vehicle Checkpoints
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Night-Watch.aspx2015-05-01T04:00:00ZNight Watch
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review-Integrated-Electronic-Security.aspx2015-02-09T05:00:00ZBook Review: Integrated Electronic Security: A Layered Approach
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Preparing-for-the-Worst-2.aspx2015-01-21T05:00:00ZVIDEO: Preparing for the worst
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/School-Security-How-To-Build-and-Strengthen-a-School-Safety-Program.aspx2015-01-01T05:00:00ZSchool Security: How to Build and Strengthen a School Safety Program
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Retail-Theft-Inc.aspx2014-10-01T04:00:00ZRetail Theft, Inc.
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/college-campus-meets.aspx2014-09-01T04:00:00ZCollege Campus Meets Urban Landscape
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/In-the-Clear.aspx2014-08-01T04:00:00ZIn the Clear

 You May Also Like...

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Yale-Opens-Doors.aspxYale Opens Doors<p>​When an anonymous person phoned in an active shooter threat to Yale University in November 2013, the central campus in New Haven, Connecticut, went into lockdown mode, and everyone was ordered to shelter in place. </p><p>The FBI and several other law enforcement agencies responded to the situation. No gunman was ever located, but Ronnell Higgins, the university’s chief of police and director of public safety, says the incident provided an opportunity for the campus to evaluate its overall safety and security posture. </p><p>“We looked at what happened versus what we want to happen in the future and, by injecting different technology and processes in, how we will improve the narrative if something similar occurs again,” Higgins says. </p><p>Active shooters are a rare occurrence at any university, including Yale, but there are a number of daily challenges the educational institution faces because it’s home to 11,000 students and a 3,200-member faculty.</p><p>“The Yale University campus is truly woven into the tapestry of the city of New Haven,” he notes, adding that there is a balance between creating a welcoming, open environment and providing security. “We don’t want to turn the place into a fortress, but we have to be ever so cognizant of the environment and our obligation to provide safety.” </p><p>While the public safety department had significantly reduced one of its biggest problems—larceny—over the last five years, Higgins says that campus law enforcement wanted to do more to not only reduce crime, but improve overall efficiencies when it came to access control. </p><p>After the active shooter threat, the vendor for Yale’s access control system began phasing out its technology. So, working with its dedicated in-house IT team, the public safety department decided on three major goals to address in updating the access control system. </p><p>They were: have a single point from which to manage access control; increase security around the movement of students, employees, and visitors; and increase overall efficiencies, including mobilizing credentials and streamlining lockdown procedures.</p><p>To determine which access control technology was most appropriate for Yale, the university hired an outside consultant to evaluate proposals, says Dave Boyd, director of information technology for the public safety department. </p><p>The university interviewed the top vendors and, in the end, chose AMAG’s Symmetry SR Solution. Implementation began in July 2014 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017; currently, more than two-thirds of the university’s buildings have been upgraded.  </p><p>The AMAG solution appealed to Yale for several reasons, including the fact that installers would not have to rip out and replace existing hardware. Instead, Symmetry uses the university’s existing wiring infrastructure, allowing it to keep the door card readers installed around its 450 buildings. </p><p>“That was one of the big selling points, because we have some buildings here that are over 200 years old with three-foot stone walls,” Boyd says. “So not having to do a rip and replace saved us millions of dollars.”</p><p>AMAG Symmetry also allows the university to manage access control for all buildings from a single interface. Eventually, Boyd says, Yale can tie in video and alarms to the system, as well as assign threat levels that will lock down certain parts of campus in the event of an incident. </p><p>AMAG Technology’s professional services team wrote an interface to Yale’s internal database to pull data into Symmetry from the university’s access control database. While Yale had to replace a computer board component within all of its existing door readers, students and faculty kept the same cards–microchips inside them were updated electronically. The credentials the faculty and students use to open the door are the same cards they use for identification, dining, and vending. </p><p>“We didn’t have to change the cards—the end users don’t even know this project is happening, just the building managers,” Boyd says.</p><p>Boyd adds that throughout the installation process, card holders would occasionally find that they did not have proper access levels after the switchover. To remedy this, the IT team went building by building to make sure the right people had access to the right places by comparing its old access control database spreadsheets to the new system. </p><p>AMAG also sent a dedicated engineer to remain on site during the first two years of the installation process. “So even issues that looked like they could have been bigger were resolved very quickly because he was on site,” Boyd adds.</p><p>Having its own public safety IT team allows Yale to tailor its technological solutions to the security needs of the campus, Higgins says. </p><p>“When Dave [Boyd] and his team are a part of our meetings, even if it doesn’t have anything to do with IT at the time, they’re thinking about how they can support us through technology, through the software, through systems like AMAG,” Higgins explains. </p><p>Boyd echoes the partnership’s effectiveness. “Most of the time we’ll sit back and just listen and try to find their pain points. Then we try to come up with technology solutions to take care of those pain points.” </p><p>He adds that the Symmetry Threat Level Manager will be activated at the end of the installation, providing even more security on campus. This feature can remotely lock down certain buildings based on the given emergency. With this feature, “it’s the push of a button” to lock down the campus, Boyd says.  </p><p>Higgins emphasizes that access control is a cornerstone for responding to any emergency. “Responding agencies may not be familiar with our architecture or the layout,” he says. “So when we think about access control…it’s incumbent on us to think about access control in emergency situations for people who aren’t familiar with our campus.” ​</p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/ASIS-News-February-2017.aspxJack Lichtenstein Leaves ASIS, Offers Insights on Trump<p>At this, the end of my 22 years as staff executive for ASIS International’s legislative and public policy work, I have been asked to provide some insights into the political near-future of security.   </p><p>These are unnerving times. Rarely has there been such uncertainty about America’s direction at home and abroad as there is at the end of 2016.  All this is in the face of mounting threats to our security and to that of our friends.</p><p>Eventually, Americans will sort it out; they always have. But there are dangers. The sorting may be long and uncertain.  And uncertainty is not the friend of security. Security requires planning, analysis, and agility, none of which can be done well in an environment filled with unknowns. Security is the antithesis of politics, which tends to be careless and messy in democracies. </p><p>The new American administration will be led by a man without credentials in government, who has pledged to change how Washington works. He was elected not as much to keep America secure but because so many Americans feel alienated from their own political and governmental institutions. They see their standard of living in decline; they sense that they have been overlooked, even disdained. More than anything, that explains the election of Donald Trump.</p><p>Trump seems to espouse two overarching themes, both recurring repeatedly in his pronouncements and appointments. One is to restore the U.S. economy to a position of world leadership. The other is to keep America and Americans secure.</p><p>The president has tools to invigorate the economy. His early aims will include accelerating job creation via infrastructure programs and tax and regulatory relief. Nearly all avenues will be aimed at job creation in the United States, despite many economic factors that are out of his control.</p><p>Security is more manageable by the White House, a result not only of presidential control of the bureaucracy but of strong (some would say excessive) executive actions in the form of Presidential Directives issued by the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations.</p><p>It is too early to tell which of Trump’s positions—many of which have been incomplete, infeasible, or conflicting—will find their way into practice. But I offer the following recommendations based on what is possible and likely:</p><p>• Pay attention to what he does, not what he says. Trump is known for impromptu statements, which get attention but are not always useful to understanding.</p><p>• Expect emphasis to be on U.S. domestic issues during the first two years. Trump will enjoy a Republican majority in Congress for that long, which he will need to get his domestic agenda passed. He is most comfortable with economic and infrastructure issues, including job creation. He knows he was elected by Americans who want first to restore their country’s economic vitality.</p><p>• “The Wall” is a metaphor, but border security will be real. U. S. Department of Homeland Security selectee and retired U.S. Marine Corps General John F. Kelly commanded the U.S. Southern Command. He understands border issues and security and will be charged with assessing vulnerabilities and determining the right combinations of physical, technological, and personnel means for dramatically reducing illegal immigration.</p><p>• In other matters of security, America will continue to be a reliable ally if for no other reason than that conflict disrupts growth. Trump will expect U.S. allies to invest heavily in their own security. This means that there will be more spending on prevention and response programs, but also avoidance of political positions, for example immigration policies, that lay bare their vulnerabilities.</p><p>• Finally, in any dealings between the United States and other countries, America must emerge a winner. That does not mean the only winner; there can be many. But the United States will not be a loser. As those familiar with Trump’s pronouncements know so well, he abhors the very thought of being a loser.</p><p>As I move on to new professional challenges, I believe more than ever that government relations is an essential role for security professionals. Its aim must be creation and maintenance of effective public-private partnerships in security. This should be part of the mission not only of ASIS but of every ASIS chapter in every country.</p><p>The people of democracies expect those overseeing government and corporate security to coordinate in the public interest. Failure to do so is unacceptable. It not only weakens security, it leaves private practitioners exposed to needless government oversight and overreaction when politicians respond, as they will, to security failures that are sometimes unforeseeable.</p><p>I thank the membership of ASIS International for the privileges of being their counsel and representing their interests these many years. Few pursuits are more vital, and few professions more important. </p><p>--<br></p><p><em>Jack Lichtenstein, former vice president, ASIS Government Affairs and Public Policy ​</em></p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Running-on-Empty.aspxRunning on Empty<p>​In this age of overload, with organizations trying to do more with less, employees buried in information, and devices that call for round-the-clock urgency, burnout is a malady ripe for our times. Burnout can strike even the most productive workers and the most consistent performers, as well as those who seem to have the greatest capacity for hard work, experts say. </p><p>One reason burnout is such a pernicious problem is that it does not have to be total for its effects to be devastating.</p><p>“Burnout tends to plateau rather than peak,” says Paula Davis-Laack, specialist in burnout prevention programs, founder and CEO of the Stress and Resilience Institute, and author of Addicted To Busy: Your Blueprint for Burnout Prevention. “Burnout exists on a continuum. You don’t have to be completely mentally broken down and barely able to get out of bed to feel major effects.”</p><p>In other words, employees suffering mid-level burnout may still be able to power through and complete an adequate amount of work by sheer force of will, but their partially depleted state greatly hinders their performance and productivity, and it keeps them from realizing their full potential. </p><p>“That can go on for months, or even years, depending on the person’s work ethic,” says management expert Brady Wilson, cofounder of Juice Inc. and author of Beyond Engagement and other business performance books. </p><p>In a field like security, workers can be especially vulnerable to burnout, given the continual pressure and stress that go into protecting people and assets, and the high stakes involved if a breach does occur. </p><p>“Constant job pressure, especially when some of the factors are out of your control like they are with security, is definitely one of the causes of burnout in employees,” says Carlos Morales, vice president of global sales, engineering, and operations at Arbor Networks, which specializes in network security. </p><p>The consequences of burnout are varied; in some cases, they involve serious health issues. Davis-Laack, who became a specialist in the field after burning out as a practicing attorney, says she experienced weekly panic attacks and a few stomachaches that were so painful they sent her to the emergency room. Coronary disease, depression, and alcohol abuse are other possible consequences. </p><p>For the employer, burnout can significantly compromise workplace quality, causing more absenteeism, turnover, accident risk, and cynicism, while lowering morale and commitment and reducing willingness among workers to help others.</p><p>Fortunately, in many cases burnout can either be avoided, with deft management and a supportive organization, or significantly alleviated using various strategic methods. But like most maladies, it must be understood before it can be properly addressed. ​</p><h4>Symptoms and Conditions</h4><p>Burnout occurs when the demands people face on the job outstrip the resources they possess to meet them. Psychologists who study burnout as a condition divide it into it three dimensions: exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment.</p><p>When the first aspect—exhaustion—hits, the employee may feel emotionally, physically, and cognitively depleted. This often spurs feelings of diminished powers; challenges that were formerly manageable can seem insurmountable. As Davis-Laack describes her own experience of this condition: “Every curveball seems like a crisis.”</p><p>When depersonalization occurs, an employee may start to feel alienated from his or her own job, and more cynical and resentful toward the organization. Work and its mission lose meaning; feelings of going-through-the-motions increase. Detached and numb, the employee tries to plow ahead. </p><p>Exhaustion and depersonalization often combine to produce the third component of reduced personal accomplishment. As Wilson explains, the depleted employee possesses considerably less “executive function,” or the ability to focus, self-regulate, connect the dots between ideas, strategize, analyze, execute smoothly, and follow through—all of which can be thought of as “the power tools of innovation.” </p><p>“Nuanced thinking and value-added thinking are the first to go when employees are exhausted,” he says. “Instead, they rely on duct-tape fixes, reactivity, firefighting. They don’t get to the root causes of problems and issues.” </p><p>The state of mind that burnout can elicit sometimes leads to self-blame, where the employee feels that he or she is professionally inadequate. But that is unfair, says Davis-Laack: “I don’t want individual workers to feel that it’s all their fault.” </p><p>The root causes of burnout, she explains, are usually a product of what employees bring to the table—work ethic, how closely they tie work to self-worth, their level of perfectionism—and how the organization itself functions, which can be an important factor. </p><p>Understanding key organizational conditions, experts say, will help managers maintain a culture that protects employees from burning out. One of these conditions involves what the organization chooses to reward. </p><p>Wilson explains this as follows. For many years, many organizations stressed the importance of keeping employees engaged. But the definition of engagement has shifted, so that many firms now define engaged workers as those with clear dedication and commitment, who come to work early and stay late. “What’s missing from this definition is passion, enthusiasm, verve, and spirit,” he says. </p><p>When engagement is so defined, increased effort, such as working more hours and taking on more projects, is rewarded. But simply increasing hours at the office does not produce high performance, Wilson says. </p><p>“We get our epiphanies in the shower—we don’t get them when we are determined and gritting our teeth around a board room table. It’s not effort that produces brilliance, it’s energy,” he explains. But sometimes, the more-rewards-for-more-work philosophy can function as an unintentional incentive to burn out.</p><p>The organization’s day-to-day working conditions are also a crucial here. Research has found that two factors can be deadly in sapping an employee’s resources, according to Davis-Laack. </p><p>One is role conflict and ambiguity, which can occur when employees are never clear on exactly what is expected of them, and on what part they should be playing in active projects. “That’s very wearing on people,” she says. </p><p>Another is unfairness, which is often related to office politics. This can include favoritism, failure to recognize contributions, being undermined, or dealing with the demands of never-satisfied supervisors.</p><p>Such stressful conditions push some employees into “gas guzzling” energy mode, because they require so much emotional effort just to cope with them, Wilson says. </p><p>“Substances generated by stress, such as cortisol and adrenaline, have a beautiful utilitarian use—to get us out of trouble, to keep us safe,” he explains. “But we are not as productive when we have a brain that is bathed in those things day in and day out.”  ​</p><h4>Detection</h4><p>Although it is vital for managers to strive to maintain a positive office culture, it’s also important to recognize that burnout can happen even in the healthiest of environments. Given this, Morales encourages attempts at early detection.  </p><p>“As a manager or executive, it is important to first note the factors that tend to cause burnout even before employees begin to show signs,” he says. “This gives you the opportunity to address issues proactively with employees.” </p><p>These factors, he explains, include a very travel-heavy schedule (50 percent or more of total work time); consistently logging work weeks of 60-plus hours; unrelenting expectations of working off-hours and on weekends; and constant deadline time pressure. </p><p>But since early detection is not always successful or even possible in some cases, managers should also be looking for common signs of burnout that their employees might be exhibiting. Morales advises security managers to look for combinations of the following characteristics that are different from usual behaviors:</p><ul><li><p> General lack of energy and enthusiasm around job functions and projects.<br></p></li><li><p> Extreme sensitivity and irritability towards coworkers, management, and work situations.<br></p></li><li><p> Constant signs of stress and anxiety.<br></p></li><li><p>Significant changes in social patterns with coworkers.<br></p></li><li><p>Sharp drop in quantity and timeliness of output.​<br></p></li></ul><p>When looking for signs of burnout, it’s important for a manager to have a high degree of familiarity with the employee in question, a familiarity which is a byproduct of a strong manager-staff relationship. </p><p>“You’ve got to know your people,” Davis-Laack says. “When someone seems more checked out and disengaged than usual, if you know your people well enough, you can spot it.” ​</p><h4>Treatment</h4><p>When it becomes clear that an employee is suffering from burnout, managers have several options for treatment and alleviation, experts say. Morales says he believes that managers must first come to an understanding of the underlying factors, so that they can be addressed.   </p><p>“If there is a workload issue, a manager may be able to spread out the workload with other workers to alleviate the issue,” he says. “It’s important to let the employees know that this is being done to gain more scale, and to reinforce that they are doing a good job.”</p><p>Indeed, crushing workloads are now common in many workplaces, experts say, as many companies are actively cost cutting while attempting to raise productivity and output. And for employees who work with data, such as security employees who use analytics, benchmarks, or some form of metrics, the information explosion is requiring more and more staff hours to keep up with the processing and analysis. Managers must be cognizant of this, Davis-Laack says. </p><p>“If you do nothing but pile work on people—well, people are not robots and they are not computers. They are going to wear out,” she explains.</p><p>To combat this, managers should employ a strategic and honest operations analysis, she advises. The department may be generating more output with increasing workloads, but burnout and turnover risk is also increasing, as is the likelihood of costly mistakes. Is it worth the risk? Hiring additional help or outsourcing some tasks may be cheaper in the long run than the costs due to turnover and errors. </p><p>When a department conducts a strategic review of operations, the focus is often on fixing glitches in process, experts say. A focus on reducing workload is less common, but when it is adopted, it often reveals that certain time-consuming tasks are unnecessary.</p><p>If the burnout is caused by a stressful job function, such as a security position in which the worker is protecting assets of great value, the manager can discuss the situation with the employee and ensure that support is available, Morales says. “This may help them feel less alone or helpless in situations,” he says.   </p><p>Another key strategy for managers is to add extra focus and energy to the resources part of the puzzle, Davis-Laack says. “Help them to build up their energy bank account, so they are not always feeling depleted.” </p><p>She offers five ways for managers to do so:  </p><ul><li><p> Maintain and ensure high-quality relationships between managers and staff members, and between team members themselves. This fosters a healthy and safe environment where problems can be discussed and addressed.  <br></p></li><li><p> Whenever possible, give team members some decision authority. This gives them a sense of autonomy and strength when dealing with issues, and helps avoid feelings of powerlessness. <br></p></li><li><p> Follow the FAST system of respectful feedback—give frequent, accurate, specific, and timely feedback. This helps employees make tweaks and adjustments, and lets them know they are on the right course.  <br></p></li><li><p> Demonstrate that you have the employees’ backs, and always be willing to go to bat for them. Don’t point fingers or complain to higher ups when mistakes are made. This is crucial in building trust.  <br></p></li><li><p> Identify and encourage skills that will help your team members build resilience. These will vary depending on the specific job and situation, but include any skill or resource that can be used when challenges arise, as well as those that help manage stress.  ​<br></p></li></ul><p>In working toward the previous point, managers may want to brainstorm with staff to find ways to make everyone more resourceful. For instance, managers could periodically check in with staff members to determine the team’s overall level of resources, so they can replenish them when they’re low.</p><p>Indeed, soliciting solutions from staff is an excellent practice for managers, because it shows they are partnering with employees, not parenting them, Wilson says. The parenting style of management assumes that the manager has knowledge that the worker will never have, and it sets up the employee for helplessness. The partnering style cultivates the employees’ decision-making skills, so they can skillfully meet their own needs. ​</p><h4>Touchy Subject</h4><p>Burnout can be a sensitive subject. Some workers attach great self-worth to their productivity and performance, and do not like to concede that they are struggling. </p><p>“It is very difficult for some high performers to admit that their engagement is lacking. There’s a sense of judgment associated with that,” Wilson says. </p><p>Some of these workers truly are burned out despite their failure to admit it, and they may be in a precarious state. “I have seen cases where the hardest and most productive workers will not admit to burnout,” Morales says. “In these situations, burnout occurs quite suddenly, without many of the behavioral warning signs.”</p><p>Other employees fear that admitting burnout is disclosing a weakness, one that could prevent them from future promotions or ultimately cost them their job. “They like their work and they don’t want to change jobs, or </p><p>they can’t change jobs because they have monetary obligations,” Davis-Laack says. </p><p>Here, management can go a long way by being proactive and soliciting feedback from workers regarding their state of mind. “It’s important to have regular discussions with employees about the impact of the workload on them personally, and give them every opportunity to talk through their situation, and vent if necessary,” Morales says. “It’s important for management to recognize the potential for burnout and approach employees proactively to discuss it. It provides employees a safe environment in which to talk through the situation.”</p><p>In these situations, a manager can approach an employee with a proactive goal—how can workload and workplace environment be shaped so that the employee is energized in the office, and still has energy left at the end of the day and on weekends for a life outside of work, Wilson explains.  </p><p>Using this framework, Wilson adds that it is often easier for the manager to then ask, “What’s getting in the way of that? Is it bureaucratic interference? Is there too much on your plate? Is there bullying going on, or other workplace environment problems?”  ​</p><h4>More Recognition</h4><p>But while burnout is still a sensitive subject among some workers, there is also a growing recognition that it is a serious issue that needs to be dealt with, experts say. This may be partly driven by recent research in fields like healthcare and finance, where findings suggest that burnout and overwork are causing costly mistakes that are detrimental to a company’s bottom line. </p><p>Moreover, more business leaders see that the problem, if left unchecked, will just get worse in the future, due to factors such as globalization and a web of technology that is becoming more and more complex. “The perfect storm is upon us,” Wilson says.</p><p>Davis-Laack says she is heartened by the fact that the burnout issue, which was frequently dismissed as too “soft” to be a subject at business conferences, is appearing on more agendas. </p><p>“It’s finally starting to get attention across different professions and different sectors,” she says. “Managers are taking it more seriously.” ​​</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465