Guard Force Management

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Role-of-School-Resource-Officers.aspxThe Role of School Resource OfficersGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-01-01T05:00:00Z<p>​Mo Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO), discusses the security implications of an SRO’s role in today’s educational environment.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. What are school resource officers (SROs) and what are some of their job functions?  </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>SROs are sworn law enforcement officers assigned by their employing law enforcement agency to work with schools. They go into the classroom with a diverse curriculum in legal education. They aid in teaching students about the legal system and helping to promote an awareness of rules, authority, and justice. Outside of the classroom, SROs are mentoring students and engaging with them in a variety of positive ways.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. What are some of the standards and best practices your organization teaches? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. T</b>here are three important things that need to happen for an SRO program to be successful. Number one, the officers must be properly selected. Number two, they have to be properly trained. And thirdly, it has to be a collaborative effort between the law enforcement agency and the school district. This can’t just be a haphazard approach of, “We have a drug problem; let’s put some police officers in there and try to combat it.” It needs to be a community-based policing approach.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. Some SROs have come under fire for being too aggressive in the classroom. What’s your take?</i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>There have been a handful of incidents that have played out in the media. But, it is up to the investigating agency to determine right and wrong. I’ve been very happy with the fact that the majority of those officers involved in these incidents have not been trained by us.</p><p class="p1"><i>Q. How does NASRO train officers to deal with potential threats? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>In our training, we certainly talk about lockdown procedures and possible responses to active shooter situations, but we don’t get too detailed. It’s really up to each agency to make those kinds of decisions. In the case of an active shooter, I don’t believe most SROs are going to wait for additional backup to get there. Most of them are so bought into their schools and their relationships with their students, that if they hear gunfire, they’re going to go try to stop whatever is happening. </p><p class="p1"><i>Q. Do SROs consider themselves security officers? </i></p><p class="p1"><b>A. </b>We’re engaged in security and it’s a big part of what we do—but it’s just one piece of what we do. Sometimes when people think about physical security, the idea of relationship building doesn’t necessarily come in there, and yet it’s the lead thing for us. We know that through those relationships, if we’re building them the right way, we may get extremely valuable information from students, parents, faculty, and staff. It’s what leads to SROs in many cases being able to head off bad situations before they happen.</p>

Guard Force Management

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Role-of-School-Resource-Officers.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZThe Role of School Resource Officers
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Security-The-Risks-of-Arming-Security-Officers.aspx2016-11-21T05:00:00ZGuns and Security: The Risks of Arming Security Officers
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Next-Tase-Phase.aspx2016-10-01T04:00:00ZThe Next Tase Phase
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/To-Arm-or-Not-to-Arm.aspx2016-08-01T04:00:00ZTo Arm or Not to Arm?
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-June-2016.aspx2016-06-01T04:00:00ZIndustry News June 2016
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Physical-Security-and-Safety.aspx2016-03-08T05:00:00ZBook Review: Physical Security and Safety
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Tase-Craze.aspx2016-03-01T05:00:00ZThe Tase Craze
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Police-and-Use-of-Force.aspx2016-02-01T05:00:00ZPolice and Use of Force
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Plan-for-Polite-Protection.aspx2015-11-02T05:00:00ZA Plan for Polite Protection
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Five-Factors-for-Guard-Booth-Design-.aspx2015-09-01T04:00:00ZFive Factors for Guard Booth Design
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/High-Stakes.aspx2015-04-01T04:00:00ZHigh Stakes
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Patchy-Training-Tactics.aspx2015-04-01T04:00:00ZPatchy Training Tactics
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Liability-and-Insurance-Implications-of-Body-Cameras.aspx2015-03-17T04:00:00ZLiability and Insurance Implications of Body Cameras
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/High-Tech-Check-In.aspx2014-12-01T05:00:00ZHigh-Tech Check In
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/cisco-introduces-push-talk-application-0012672.aspx2013-08-20T04:00:00ZCisco Introduces Push-to-Talk Application
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/aussies-consider-date-birth-guard-ids-_E2_80_98excessive-personal-information_E2_80_99-009782.aspx2012-04-16T04:00:00ZAussies Consider Date of Birth on Guard IDs ‘Excessive Personal Information’
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Virtual-Reality-Racing-and-the-Final-Frontier.aspx2011-09-01T04:00:00ZVirtual Reality, Racing, and the Final Frontier
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Changing-of-the-Guard.aspx2011-07-01T04:00:00ZChanging of the Guard

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-February-2017.aspxIndustry News February 2017<h4>​CAMPUS SURVEILLANCE</h4><p>Two universities in Utah partnered with Stone Security to upgrade their existing surveillance systems. Utah State University and Salt Lake Community College both had standalone analog systems with few cameras that could be monitored from only one location. Both schools chose to implement open platform, IP-based solutions built with Milestone XProtect VMS and network cameras from Axis Communications. Axis encoders integrate older analog cameras into the system, allowing the schools to continue using them.</p><p>Utah State University has campuses in every county in the state, and nine of those locations are integrated with the Milestone system. Video data is fed to the main campus in Logan, Utah.</p><p>Better video monitoring has improved coordination with campus police, reducing the time for incident response, as well as mitigating theft in the campus bookstores. The video system has also been leveraged to include watching over livestock in an animal science department, so researchers can respond when a birth is imminent, for example. Another innovative way officials are using the video is to prioritize snow removal based on the accumulations seen in the images.​</p><h4>PARTNERSHIPS AND DEALS</h4><p>ADT announced a new affiliation with MetLife Auto & Home for small business customers in New Jersey and California.</p><p>Dell EMC chose BlueTalon to deliver data security and governance for the newly announced Dell EMC Analytic Insights Module. </p><p>G4S will deploy ThruVis from Digital Barriers at major events in the United Kingdom.</p><p>Federal Signal Corporation’s Safety and Security Systems Group formed a strategic partnership with Edesix Ltd. to offer IndiCue products that collect, distribute, and manage video evidence. </p><p>FinalCode, Inc., appointed DNA Connect as its distributor for Australia.</p><p>Genetec and Point Blank announced a direct integration between the IRIS CAM body-worn camera and the Genetec Clearance case management system.</p><p>Hanwha Techwin America formed a partnership with Security-Net Inc., allowing Security-Net’s partners to source the full line of Hanwha Techwin’s surveillance solutions as a gold level dealer.</p><p>ISONAS Inc. selected two new manufacturers’ representatives: Wilens Professional Sales, Inc., in New York and The Tronex Group in Florida.</p><p>Kwikset formed a partnership with Horizon Global to expand its SmartKey security to the automotive accessories industry, including hitches, fifth wheels, ball mounts, bike racks, cargo management products, and more.</p><p>Louroe Electronics signed with Tech Sales & Marketing and expanded its partnership with Thomasson Marketing Group to strengthen its presence across the United States.</p><p>Oceanscan is using iland’s DRaaS with Veeam to reduce incident response time.</p><p>OnSSI integrated its Ocularis 5 Video Management System with Vidsys’s Converged Security and Information Management software. </p><p>OnX Enterprise Solutions and Splunk collaborated on the new OnX Security Intelligence Appliance that implements both the hardware and software needed to combat attackers.</p><p>Open Options partnered with Mercury Security to offer two new bridge technology integrations with Software House iSTAR Pro and Vanderbilt SMS. </p><p>Red Hawk Fire & Security U.S. announced that Affiliated Monitoring will manage central station monitoring for Red Hawk customers. </p><p>SeQent has been accepted into the Schneider Electric/Wonderware Technology Partner program. </p><p>FC TecNrgy will market SFC Energy’s defense and industry portfolio of off-grid power sources to the Indian defense, homeland security, and oil and gas markets. </p><p>ZKAccess retained manufacturers’ rep firm ISM Southeast.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>The U.S. Federal Trade Commission selected AMAG Technology and its Symmetry Homeland Access Control System to secure its Office of the Executive Director.</p><p>Convergint Technologies and BriefCam announced that Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Texas expanded its use of BriefCam Syndex.</p><p>For the Las Vegas presidential debate, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department deployed a drone detection and counter-drone solution from Dedrone. Dedrone also joined forces with Nassau County Police and Hofstra University to protect the first presidential debate in New York.</p><p>The Payne County Sheriff’s Office in Oklahoma selected Digi Security Systems to design and install a new video system for its jail and courthouse.</p><p>Electronic Control Security, Inc., received an award from prime contractor Hudson Valley EC&M Inc. for an entry control system and support services for the Sullivan County and Eastern Correctional Facilities in New York.</p><p>Exiger was chosen by the University of Cincinnati to act as the independent monitor of its police department.</p><p>Port St. Lucie, Florida, worked with SecurPoint to install a wireless, IP-based video surveillance system from FLIR.</p><p>Johnson Controls announced a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to help secure critical infrastructure.</p><p>Leidos won a prime contract from U.S. Customs and Border Protection to provide systems administration and maintenance services for x-ray and imaging technology.</p><p>MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. will provide space-based synthetic aperture radar capabilities for the Canadian Department of National Defence.</p><p>NAPCO Security Technologies, Inc., announced that the San Diego Unified School District will use NAPCO’s Continental Access control system.</p><p>NC4 announced that the Fulton County Police Department in California chose NC4 Street Smart to help fight crime.</p><p>Palo Alto Networks signed a memorandum of collaboration with the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore to exchange ideas, insights, and expertise on cybersecurity. </p><p>Saab announced that its Airport Surface Surveillance Capability is operational for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration at San Francisco International Airport.</p><p>Salient CRGT, Inc., won a contract from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate to provide development, integration, and evaluation in support of BorderRITE.</p><p>SDI Presence LLC is a key subcontractor to Saab Sensis in deploying an advanced event management system for Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.</p><p>TASER International received an order for 900 TASER X2 Smart Weapons from the Kentucky State Police.</p><p>Unisys Corporation won a contract from U.S. Customs and Border Protection to modernize the agency’s technology for identifying people and vehicles entering and exiting the country.</p><p>Veridos is providing the Republic of Kosovo with ePassports in addition to a solution to personalize the ePassports. Veridos is responsible for data management, as well as service and maintenance for the software and</p><p>hardware infrastructure.</p><p>Veteran Corps of America will perform contractor logistics support for the Joint United States Forces Korea Portal and Integrated Threat Recognition (JUPITR) system.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>AMAG Technology announced that its Federal Identity, Credential, and Access Management (FICAM)/FIPS 201–compliant solution was approved by the U.S. General Services Administration.</p><p>Legrand North America achieved Excellence within the Industry Data Exchange Association’s data certification program.</p><p>Middle Atlantic Products secured a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for its Essex QAR Series Rack.</p><p>Passport Systems, Inc., received the Security Innovation Award from Massachusetts Port Authority for helping to revitalize the Port of Boston with state-of-the-art detection systems.</p><p>Qognify received Lenel Factory Certification Under Lenel’s OpenAccess Alliance Program.</p><p>Safran Identity & Security announced that its Airpass mobile payment solution, with a cryptographic security component, was certified by Visa and Mastercard.</p><p>SecurityScorecard received the Most Promising Company Award for its sophisticated technology and strategic implementation during PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Inaugural Cyber Security Day.</p><p>Tosibox won the Finnish Security Company of the Year award. The Turvallisuus ja Riskienhallinta magazine annual award was presented at the Finnish Security Awards. ​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>As part of its product rebranding, 3xLOGIC launched an updated website.</p><p>Aite Group’s report, Biometrics: The Time Has Come, examines biometrics capabilities that are deployed across the globe. </p><p>Allied Universal announced the purchase of FJC Security Services of Floral Park, New York.</p><p>Anixter International Inc. is opening a customized flagship facility in Houston, Texas.</p><p>Illinois Joining Forces, a public-private network of veteran and military service organizations, received a $125,000 grant for veteran outreach from Boeing.</p><p>CGL Electronic Security, Inc., moved its corporate headquarters to Westwood, Massachusetts. The new facility includes a customer training area, demonstration space, warehouse, and testing area.</p><p>CNL Software expanded its U.S. operations with new regional offices and a demonstration area in Ashburn, Virginia.</p><p>College Choice published its 2016 ranking of the safest large colleges in America.</p><p>The Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center established the Financial Systemic Analysis & Resilience Center to mitigate risk to the U.S. financial system.</p><p>Modern Tools To Achieve Excellence In Video Security is a new white paper from Geutebrück.</p><p>Implant Sciences will sell its explosives trace detection assets to L-3 Communications where they will be integrated into L-3’s Security & Detection Systems Division.</p><p>Milestone Systems is making its XProtect Essential 2016 R3 available as a free download to users worldwide.</p><p>The National Electrical Manufacturers Association published NEMA WD 7-2011 (R2016) Occupancy Motion Sensors Standard.</p><p>Safran Identity & Security opened a location in the Silicon Valley that features an innovation center with a specific focus on digital payment, digital identity, and the Internet of Things.</p><p>Nonprofit SecureTheVillage (STV) launched a weekly news podcast, SecureTheVillage’s Cybersecurity News of the Week, available on the STV website, iTunes, SoundCloud, and other podcast sites. </p><p>SightLogix published a new design guide to assist integrators, architects, and engineers in planning, selecting, and installing video-based security systems. Securing Outdoor Assets with Trusted Alerts offers practical advice about using outdoor video.</p><p>The Smart Card Alliance released a mobile payments workshop video for understanding mobile wallets.</p><p>The Tyco Security Products Cyber Protection Team is offering security advisories on its website. The team generates a security notification about which products might be vulnerable, along with mitigation steps. </p><p>The U.S. Office of Management and Budget will create a new privacy office to oversee the development and implementation of new federal privacy policies, strategies, and practices across the federal government. ​</p>GP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Security-The-Risks-of-Arming-Security-Officers.aspxGuns and Security: The Risks of Arming Security Officers<p>​Cinemark was not to blame for the 2012 shooting at its Aurora, Colorado, movie theater where gunman James Holmes killed 12 people and injured 70 more. A jury did not find a <a href="http://www.denverpost.com/2016/05/19/cinemark-not-liable-for-aurora-theater-shooting-civil-jury-says/" target="_blank">lawyer’s argument compelling</a> that Cinemark should have provided armed security officers at the premier for <em>The Dark Knight Rises</em> because it was anticipating large crowds.</p><p>But should Cinemark have? Debates about armed security officers have flared up in the media and public discourse over the past few years. With the combination of a uniform and a firearm, armed officers may suggest a sense of security to the greater public, signaling that a business takes security and protection seriously. Others believe the presence of a gun merely stands to escalate dangerous situations.<br></p><p>The debate over the effect of firearms in such settings will not be settled anytime soon. But there are some things we do know about the consequences of arming security officers. Looking at it from an insurance perspective gives us a vantage to examine the risks and real-life consequences of arming security officers.<br></p><p><strong>Demand for Officers</strong><br></p><p>There are more than 1 million private security officers in the United States and about 650,000 police officers, according to the federal <a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes333051.htm" target="_blank">Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)</a>. After several years of steep increases in the number of security officers, the field is expected to grow by a steady 5 percent every year, the BLS estimates. Private security officers, more and more, are the face of security in the United States.</p><p>In some industries, such as healthcare, armed officers are a growing presence. Crime in healthcare facilities is a serious issue, so hospitals are looking to provide stronger security. The percentage of healthcare facilities that reported staffing armed officers in 2014 was almost double the rate four years prior, according to an <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/14/us/hospital-guns-mental-health.html" target="_blank"><em>article in The New York Times. </em><br></a></p><p>“To protect their corridors, 52 percent of medical centers reported that their security personnel carried handguns and 47 percent said they used Tasers,” the Times reported, citing a 2014 survey by the International Association for Healthcare Security and Safety.<br></p><p>As discussed in a previous <em></em><a href="/Pages/The-Dangers-of-Protection-What-Makes-a-Guard-Firm-Low--or-High-Risk.aspx" target="_blank"><em>Security Management </em>article,</a> there’s been a pronounced demand for insurance for armed security officers at legal marijuana facilities. We can always expect there to be demand for armed officers at government facilities, though the demand at schools has decreased slightly.<br></p><p><strong>Pros and Cons of Armed Officers</strong><br></p><p>Many people perceive armed security officers favorably as a deterrent against violence and an assurance that a violent incident can be quickly quelled. From a client’s standpoint, it offers a perception of higher protection.</p><p>Armed security officers are widely accepted as warranted in certain locations where the threat level matches the use of force. Government contracts and high-profile corporate executives are protected by highly trained armed officers. At banks, the risk of robbery also justifies an armed officer.<br></p><p>But from an insurance and risk standpoint, it is difficult to craft a convincing argument for armed security officers in many settings. The presence of a gun is not proven to de-escalate a situation in every environment, and it is unlikely to deter violent and determined individuals. The presence of an additional firearm—even in an officer’s hands—only stands to increase the risk of casualties. This is particularly true of public or crowded environments, like stadiums, schools, and restaurants.<br></p><p>By looking at insurance claims, it’s clear that when a security officer discharges his or her gun, the resulting claims are serious. There is a big difference between an officer using mace and an officer using a gun. Claims resulting from the use of firearms are likely to breach insurance policy limits, so firms employing armed security officers are wise to purchase higher limits of liability than firms not employing armed officers.<br></p><p>When someone is shot by a security officer, his—or his estate—will likely sue the business that contracted the officer. And the security firm and officer are going to be brought into the suit as well—no matter how well-trained the officer. If it goes to trial, it is very rare for a judge and jury to believe use of the weapon was justified. It is almost always perceived as excessive force.<br></p><p>The insurance marketplace for security firms is very small, and employing armed officers reduces the market even further. This means firms that provide armed officers will be paying a higher premium for less coverage; they will most likely be relegated to the surplus lines insurance market, which can mean more policy exclusions. Therefore, it’s important for the security firm to weigh the increased costs and policy limitations of taking on an armed contract.<br></p><p><strong>Mitigating Risks of Armed Officers</strong><br></p><p>If a client insists on armed officers, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of an officer discharging his or her weapon. </p><p>All officers should be checked against lists of individuals who are not permitted to carry firearms, in addition to the usual criminal background check. For armed posts, staff them with off-duty or former law enforcement officers; police receive extensive firearms training, as well as other training that helps them de-escalate challenging situations.<br></p><p>Consider local or state licensing requirements for armed security officers—they can vary by municipality. In some states, armed officers are not required to have special firearms training. For those states that do, officers and clients can be protected by ensuring that officers are trained to use firearms. Situational training, which is recommended for all officers, is particularly important for armed security officers as it teaches them to understand a judicious use of force for the environment they serve.<br></p><p>There are no easy, blanket answers to the question of whether to arm security officers. But looking at the risks and financial implications might help security leaders make decisions on a case-by-case basis.<br></p><p><em>Tory Brownyard is the president of Brownyard Group, a program administrator that pioneered liability insurance for security guard firms more than 60 years ago. He can be reached at tbrownyard@brownyard.com or 1-800-645-5820.</em><br></p><p><br></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Physical-Security-and-Safety.aspxBook Review: Physical Security and Safety<p>​​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">Physical Security and Safety: A Field Guide for the Practitioner. By Truett A. Ricks, Bobby E. Ricks, and Jeffrey Dingle. Published by CRC Press; crcpress.com; 179 pages; $89.95.</span></p><p>This comprehensive, yet simple to use, overview of basic concepts relating to physical security and safety covers security fundamentals such as CCTV, lighting, security surveys, and risk assessments. The first part of the book covers the theory and concepts of security, including identification of security threats and vulnerabilities, protection, and risk assessment. The second half examines physical protection, including access and perimeter control, alarm systems, and IT issues.</p><p> The format of the book allows the security professional to quickly glance at a chapter on an area of interest and find the salient information. For example, while working on a lighting survey, the reader can find an overview of the types of lighting as they relate to a security project, as well as a foot-candle chart indicating what is appropriate for a particular setting. </p><p>Beyond its role as a field guide, the text provides such a vast overview of security concepts, it could also serve well as a study guide for many industry certifications. A brief, practical chapter on writing effective policies and procedures is clear and concise and outlines the goals and the requirements of policies and procedures. In this area, simple is often better, and the guidance here is excellent.</p><p><em>Physical Security and Safety</em> dedicates a useful amount of space to regulatory bodies (OSHA, NIOSH, NFPA, for example) and their impact on security and safety. While the book does not claim to be an all-encompassing guide to industry standards and regulations, it can serve as a quick reference so the practitioner will know if a particular regulation must be further researched.</p><p> The book’s appendix includes a practical and flexible security survey (security checklist) that can serve as the foundation for reports and assessments the reader may find the need to develop. </p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Michael D'Angelo, CPP</strong>, is the security manager for Baptist Health South Florida. He is a retired police captain from the South Miami, Florida Police Department where he served for 20 years. He is an ASIS member who serves on both the Healthcare Security Council and the ASIS Transitions Ad Hoc Council.</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465