Guard Force Management

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-a-Professional-Guard-Force.aspxBuilding a Professional Guard ForceGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652017-10-10T04:00:00Z<p>In today's environment of heightened security in all areas, security departments are struggling to attract and retain high-quality guards. Now more than ever, it's vital to examine how security guards are evaluated, trained, and compensated.</p><p>All entities, including corporations and government facilities, understand the importance of a top-notch security force. However, not all of them recognize the elements needed to create such a force.</p><p>Security managers may presume that a security guard who passed the preemployment screening and successfully completed training when hired will perform the required duties well. And that may be true. But human nature allows people to become complacent, cut corners, and get too comfortable. Continuing education, regularly scheduled evaluations, and enhanced training can improve the team's performance.</p><p>On March 1, 2016, at Escuela Campo Alegre, Caracas, Venezuela, we initiated a new method of recruitment and selection for incoming loss prevention and control analysts (LPCAs). At that time, we chose to enhance our program by hiring 10 people with bachelor's or associate degrees in engineering, economics, administration, education, and other related fields.</p><p>We developed a screening and training program for candidates hoping to join our security team as LPCAs. In addition, we created a regimen of close supervision and daily evaluation of the security force to reinforce the training. </p><p>Here are the elements that led to success in creating excellent employees for our school's protection, from the first job application to seasoned protection professional.</p><p><strong>SCREENING AND TRAINING</strong></p><p><strong>Detailed job description. </strong>Experience has taught me the importance of a detailed and clearly stated job description. Candidates for the position of LPCA receive a precise explanation of the duties and expectations. This is presented first so that potential candidates fully understand the duties and responsibilities of the position. If the job description isn't something the candidate wants to do, we have saved everyone a lot of time.</p><p><strong>Required qualifications. </strong>Every security force has necessary requirements when seeking team members such as age, place of residence, experience, physical abilities, criminal background, and computer skills. Education, of course, is taken into consideration, and at Escuela Campo Alegre we look for higher education, from associate degree to bachelor's degree and up, for LPCA candidates.</p><p><strong>Testing potential candidates. </strong>LPCAs must have certain abilities from the beginning.</p><p><em>Observation.</em> The candidate must be attentive and aware at all times of the general appearance of people, placement of objects, locations, colors, vehicles, and location of security equipment.</p><p><em>Oral communication.</em> The candidate must be able to respond in detail when relaying and explaining the facts of a situation. The candidate must also be able to delegate duties to a third party using clear directions.  </p><p><em>Written communication: </em>The candidate must be able to write a report using correct grammar and vocabulary. An excellent memory is needed to write a complete report. Also, the candidate must be computer literate to produce the report.</p><p>During the interview process, we determine if the candidate has the qualifications listed above. We evaluate the ability to give directions properly to a third party. Observation skills are also evaluated. Reporting skills are tested by having the candidate read and summarize a paragraph using a computer.</p><p><strong>Introduction to private surveillance. </strong>A candidate who passes the initial interview process is invited to attend an eight-hour training presentation the next day. This introduction exposes the candidate to the basic requirements of private security. Among the topics addressed are the expectations of a security officer, the organizational mission, legal aspects, visitor management, keys and locks, and guard tours.</p><p>After the presentation, the candidate undergoes a test, which requires 17 points to pass. If successful, the candidate is invited to come the following day to read the operations manual. </p><p><strong>Operations manual. </strong>This next step is important. We determined that it requires five business days to read, analyze, and understand the school's operations manual. We administer an evaluation at the end of each day to determine whether the candidate has understood the reading for the day. This helps to clarify questions or misunderstandings the candidate may have. If the candidate does not reach the minimum score during the first evaluation, the average of the first and second tests must be a passing score. Candidates who do not receive the required score are no longer considered, but those who pass the evaluation are invited to the induction program.</p><p><strong>Induction program. </strong>This phase of our program provides detailed descriptions of the jobs to be performed. Candidates learn that they will rotate throughout the facility and understand that there are multiple and varying tasks at each location. They receive on-the-job exposure to the work by staying at our institution during four day shifts and two night shifts.</p><p>The candidate is evaluated each day, and the minimum passing grade is 17 out of 20 points. Once again, candidates who do not receive a passing grade will no longer be considered for a position.</p><p><strong>Final evaluation. </strong>After passing the induction program, the candidate will meet with the security manager for the final assessment. This assessment includes topics such as employee identification, addresses of various locations, location of safety equipment, knowledge of the operations manual, recognition of patrol routes, and disciplinary code.</p><p><strong>Assignment to a guard group. </strong>Candidates who advance through the final evaluation receive the rank of Officer I and are assigned to a regular working group. Together with the supervisor, the officer will put into practice all theoretical and practical knowledge achieved through training. The officer will work as an auxiliary for 90 days and will perform day-shift and night-shift tasks in conjunction with the assigned group. </p><p>During this trial period, the officer will be guided and instructed by the supervisor regarding the responsibilities of the log book; closing and opening of facilities; operation of lighting; vehicle fleets; entry and exit of students; entrance of drivers, chauffeurs, and caregivers; Escuela Campo Alegre staff, contractors, tutors, substitutes, trainers, and frequent visitors; entry and exit materials; fire alarm system; evacuation drill; and many other activities. </p><p><strong>Completing the probationary period</strong>. Once Officer I completes the probationary period, we administer an evaluation to demonstrate readiness to assume multiple responsibilities. If the officer does not pass the evaluation, an additional 15 days as an auxiliary allows for more instruction, followed by another evaluation. When this evaluation is passed, the individual is promoted to Officer II.</p><p><strong>Certification as Loss Prevention and Control Analyst. </strong>An Officer II will work for nine continuous months at the new job, demonstrating knowledge of establishing priorities, situation analysis, decision making, safety, conflict management, investigations, and first aid. Depending on performance and the results of monthly assessments, it can be determined that the officer has a clear understanding of what constitutes the work of the supervisor. The officer is now eligible to be certified as an LPCA. A further evaluation involves a series of cases and situations and requires a passing score to become a certified LPCA.</p><p>Out of 120 people who apply for a position as an LPCA, only about 10 successfully reach this point.</p><p><strong>EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT</strong></p><p><strong>Training updates. </strong>In our organization, we believe that providing continuous training enhances the performance of each member of the group. Daily training is provided to each member of the guard force for 15 minutes prior to the day shift and the night shift. This training is different every day and covers more than 40 areas related to the fulfillment of security tasks. The training aims to strengthen the knowledge and ability to perform required tasks.</p><p><strong>Daily evaluations. </strong>From the first moment the candidate joins our ranks, we stress the importance of maintaining our organization with a spirit of healthy competition within the groups. This interest and enthusiasm in our organization fosters respect, pride, and knowledge about the organization.</p><p>The daily evaluation is a practical application that consists of the exchange of files and questions that the coordinator of vigilance presents to each member of the group. Officers must demonstrate their ability to recognize the faces of employees, know the geographical location of any room on campus, know the exact location of the security equipment, provide detailed information of the operations manual, run the courses correctly, and honor the disciplinary code. This daily evaluation keeps officers on their toes and objectively assesses their knowledge.</p><p><strong>Monthly evaluations. </strong>At the end of each month, the scores from the daily assessments are reviewed, allowing us to determine who has been an outstanding analyst and who may need more supervision and additional training. Officers who come up short three times during the school year are reassigned to jobs outside of Escuela Campo Alegre. </p><p><strong>LPCA lectures. </strong>Each LPCA of Campo Alegre School, as part of ongoing professional development, must present a lecture about security once a year. Each 20-minute lecture is followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer session. The topic of the lecture is assigned by management. </p><p><strong>Annual research presentation. </strong>For further professional development, each LPCA at Escuela Campo Alegre must research and propose new tools, criteria, or procedures to make the job function better and more efficiently. This improves the LPCA's skills while helping management meet its objectives.</p><p><strong>Interpersonal communications with management. </strong>Once a week, an off-duty analyst will attend an hour-long meeting with management. The parties discuss topics not related to work, such as sports, hobbies, and leisure pursuits. Management gains an appreciation of the social, cultural, and familial environment of the analyst, and both participants strengthen their communication. </p><p><strong>Disciplinary court. </strong>If any officer is involved in a disciplinary action, that officer seeks a member of his group to act as his "lawyer." The lawyer will represent the officer and help to clarify the situation. Likewise, management will choose an officer to act as "prosecutor" to argue the case of the disciplinary action. This interaction allows each party a fair chance to present facts. </p><p><strong>LPCA authors. </strong>Every member of the security team is required to write an article about campus security. The article is published in our digital magazine and is shared with the Campo Alegre community, including parents, students, teachers, employees, and contractors.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the month. </strong>Each month, an officer who has successfully met all objectives is awarded LPCA of the month. The objectives include staff identification, detailed knowledge of the campus, analytical prowess with regard to the operations manual, location of safety equipment, completion of duties, and adherence to the disciplinary code. The officer must demonstrate clear concise communication and common sense.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the year. </strong>This honor is awarded to the LPCA who has received the greatest number of monthly awards.</p><p><strong>Compensation. </strong>In addition to careful training, we know that humans respond well to a good salary and benefits. They feel appreciated for a job well done. We are proud to say that our LPCAs are the best paid in the country. In addition, they receive a stipend for being a university graduate, a stipend for transportation, and bonuses for work performance. The Escuela Campo Alegre community also shows appreciation through thank you notes and personal gratitude. That goes a long way in making our team feel appreciated.</p><p><strong>RESULTS</strong></p><p>Since Escuela Campo Alegre began this program of recruitment, training, supervision, daily evaluations, and professional development of analysts, management has observed both positive and negative behaviors: distractibility, obscurity, lack of discipline, lack of confidence to perform duties, inequality when working in groups, selfishness, and lying, as well as professionalism, fairness, honesty, transparency, and overall pride in the work and the institution. </p><p>Our evaluation system contributes greatly toward a successful program. A Google Doc is available so that every person on the task force can monitor his behavior and improve in areas of operation, manual details, face recognition, geographic location on campus, security equipment location on campus and security rounds. With this information available at any time, they can self-motivate and improve. The same Google Doc can show them where they stand as far as positioning and they can see what salary increase they may expect on their next evaluation. The disciplinary system tracks all mistakes made by the analyst on duty. This provides the analyst the opportunity to correct mistakes and advance in the program.</p><p>Our turnover is very low because of our evaluation system. It not only helps those who wish to advance, but it also allows others to realize, on their own, that their job performance is too low to continue.</p><p>The analysts take pride in their work and, because they can see what other analysts are achieving, they can collaborate and ask questions of those higher achievers. There are fewer missed shifts. Because the analysts work so closely together and respect each other, they are more willing to cover for a team member.</p><p>It has been arduous work that involves a great deal of discipline, ethics and morals, teaching, and faith in what we are doing. We are proud of our successful program and will continue to refine and improve it in the future.</p><p><em>Guillermo Guevara Penso was security manager at Escuela Campo Alegre in Caracas, Venezuela, until July 2017 when he elected to seek other security related opportunities in Chile. He has more than 30 years of experience in the security field.</em></p>

Guard Force Management

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-a-Professional-Guard-Force.aspx2017-10-10T04:00:00ZBuilding a Professional Guard Force
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Tuesday-Education-Sessions-Address-Security-Challenges.aspx2017-09-27T04:00:00ZTuesday Education Sessions Address Security Challenges
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Say-Thanks--National-Security-Officer-Appreciation-Week-Kicks-Off-.aspx2017-09-18T04:00:00ZSay Thanks: National Security Officer Appreciation Week Kicks Off
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Uniform-Color-Theory.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZUniform Color Theory
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Peer-2-Peer-Protection.aspx2017-09-01T04:00:00ZPeer 2 Peer Protection
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Guard-Scheduling-Conundrum.aspx2017-08-14T04:00:00ZThe Guard Scheduling Conundrum
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/¡PRESTA-ATENCIÓN!.aspx2017-07-13T04:00:00Z¡PRESTA ATENCIÓN!
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Role-of-School-Resource-Officers.aspx2017-01-01T05:00:00ZThe Role of School Resource Officers
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Security-The-Risks-of-Arming-Security-Officers.aspx2016-11-21T05:00:00ZGuns and Security: The Risks of Arming Security Officers
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Next-Tase-Phase.aspx2016-10-01T04:00:00ZThe Next Tase Phase
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/To-Arm-or-Not-to-Arm.aspx2016-08-01T04:00:00ZTo Arm or Not to Arm?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Top-Five-Design-Considerations-for-Control-Rooms.aspx2016-06-09T04:00:00ZTop Five Design Considerations for Control Rooms
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Industry-News-June-2016.aspx2016-06-01T04:00:00ZIndustry News June 2016
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Dangers-of-Protection-What-Makes-a-Guard-Firm-Low--or-High-Risk.aspx2016-03-15T04:00:00ZThe Dangers of Protection: What Makes a Guard Firm Low- or High-Risk?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Physical-Security-and-Safety.aspx2016-03-08T05:00:00ZBook Review: Physical Security and Safety
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/The-Tase-Craze.aspx2016-03-01T05:00:00ZThe Tase Craze
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Police-and-Use-of-Force.aspx2016-02-01T05:00:00ZPolice and Use of Force
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/A-Plan-for-Polite-Protection.aspx2015-11-02T05:00:00ZA Plan for Polite Protection
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Five-Factors-for-Guard-Booth-Design-.aspx2015-09-01T04:00:00ZFive Factors for Guard Booth Design
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/High-Stakes.aspx2015-04-01T04:00:00ZHigh Stakes

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-a-Professional-Guard-Force.aspxBuilding a Professional Guard Force<p>In today's environment of heightened security in all areas, security departments are struggling to attract and retain high-quality guards. Now more than ever, it's vital to examine how security guards are evaluated, trained, and compensated.</p><p>All entities, including corporations and government facilities, understand the importance of a top-notch security force. However, not all of them recognize the elements needed to create such a force.</p><p>Security managers may presume that a security guard who passed the preemployment screening and successfully completed training when hired will perform the required duties well. And that may be true. But human nature allows people to become complacent, cut corners, and get too comfortable. Continuing education, regularly scheduled evaluations, and enhanced training can improve the team's performance.</p><p>On March 1, 2016, at Escuela Campo Alegre, Caracas, Venezuela, we initiated a new method of recruitment and selection for incoming loss prevention and control analysts (LPCAs). At that time, we chose to enhance our program by hiring 10 people with bachelor's or associate degrees in engineering, economics, administration, education, and other related fields.</p><p>We developed a screening and training program for candidates hoping to join our security team as LPCAs. In addition, we created a regimen of close supervision and daily evaluation of the security force to reinforce the training. </p><p>Here are the elements that led to success in creating excellent employees for our school's protection, from the first job application to seasoned protection professional.</p><p><strong>SCREENING AND TRAINING</strong></p><p><strong>Detailed job description. </strong>Experience has taught me the importance of a detailed and clearly stated job description. Candidates for the position of LPCA receive a precise explanation of the duties and expectations. This is presented first so that potential candidates fully understand the duties and responsibilities of the position. If the job description isn't something the candidate wants to do, we have saved everyone a lot of time.</p><p><strong>Required qualifications. </strong>Every security force has necessary requirements when seeking team members such as age, place of residence, experience, physical abilities, criminal background, and computer skills. Education, of course, is taken into consideration, and at Escuela Campo Alegre we look for higher education, from associate degree to bachelor's degree and up, for LPCA candidates.</p><p><strong>Testing potential candidates. </strong>LPCAs must have certain abilities from the beginning.</p><p><em>Observation.</em> The candidate must be attentive and aware at all times of the general appearance of people, placement of objects, locations, colors, vehicles, and location of security equipment.</p><p><em>Oral communication.</em> The candidate must be able to respond in detail when relaying and explaining the facts of a situation. The candidate must also be able to delegate duties to a third party using clear directions.  </p><p><em>Written communication: </em>The candidate must be able to write a report using correct grammar and vocabulary. An excellent memory is needed to write a complete report. Also, the candidate must be computer literate to produce the report.</p><p>During the interview process, we determine if the candidate has the qualifications listed above. We evaluate the ability to give directions properly to a third party. Observation skills are also evaluated. Reporting skills are tested by having the candidate read and summarize a paragraph using a computer.</p><p><strong>Introduction to private surveillance. </strong>A candidate who passes the initial interview process is invited to attend an eight-hour training presentation the next day. This introduction exposes the candidate to the basic requirements of private security. Among the topics addressed are the expectations of a security officer, the organizational mission, legal aspects, visitor management, keys and locks, and guard tours.</p><p>After the presentation, the candidate undergoes a test, which requires 17 points to pass. If successful, the candidate is invited to come the following day to read the operations manual. </p><p><strong>Operations manual. </strong>This next step is important. We determined that it requires five business days to read, analyze, and understand the school's operations manual. We administer an evaluation at the end of each day to determine whether the candidate has understood the reading for the day. This helps to clarify questions or misunderstandings the candidate may have. If the candidate does not reach the minimum score during the first evaluation, the average of the first and second tests must be a passing score. Candidates who do not receive the required score are no longer considered, but those who pass the evaluation are invited to the induction program.</p><p><strong>Induction program. </strong>This phase of our program provides detailed descriptions of the jobs to be performed. Candidates learn that they will rotate throughout the facility and understand that there are multiple and varying tasks at each location. They receive on-the-job exposure to the work by staying at our institution during four day shifts and two night shifts.</p><p>The candidate is evaluated each day, and the minimum passing grade is 17 out of 20 points. Once again, candidates who do not receive a passing grade will no longer be considered for a position.</p><p><strong>Final evaluation. </strong>After passing the induction program, the candidate will meet with the security manager for the final assessment. 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A further evaluation involves a series of cases and situations and requires a passing score to become a certified LPCA.</p><p>Out of 120 people who apply for a position as an LPCA, only about 10 successfully reach this point.</p><p><strong>EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT</strong></p><p><strong>Training updates. </strong>In our organization, we believe that providing continuous training enhances the performance of each member of the group. Daily training is provided to each member of the guard force for 15 minutes prior to the day shift and the night shift. This training is different every day and covers more than 40 areas related to the fulfillment of security tasks. The training aims to strengthen the knowledge and ability to perform required tasks.</p><p><strong>Daily evaluations. </strong>From the first moment the candidate joins our ranks, we stress the importance of maintaining our organization with a spirit of healthy competition within the groups. This interest and enthusiasm in our organization fosters respect, pride, and knowledge about the organization.</p><p>The daily evaluation is a practical application that consists of the exchange of files and questions that the coordinator of vigilance presents to each member of the group. Officers must demonstrate their ability to recognize the faces of employees, know the geographical location of any room on campus, know the exact location of the security equipment, provide detailed information of the operations manual, run the courses correctly, and honor the disciplinary code. This daily evaluation keeps officers on their toes and objectively assesses their knowledge.</p><p><strong>Monthly evaluations. </strong>At the end of each month, the scores from the daily assessments are reviewed, allowing us to determine who has been an outstanding analyst and who may need more supervision and additional training. Officers who come up short three times during the school year are reassigned to jobs outside of Escuela Campo Alegre. </p><p><strong>LPCA lectures. </strong>Each LPCA of Campo Alegre School, as part of ongoing professional development, must present a lecture about security once a year. Each 20-minute lecture is followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer session. The topic of the lecture is assigned by management. </p><p><strong>Annual research presentation. </strong>For further professional development, each LPCA at Escuela Campo Alegre must research and propose new tools, criteria, or procedures to make the job function better and more efficiently. This improves the LPCA's skills while helping management meet its objectives.</p><p><strong>Interpersonal communications with management. </strong>Once a week, an off-duty analyst will attend an hour-long meeting with management. The parties discuss topics not related to work, such as sports, hobbies, and leisure pursuits. Management gains an appreciation of the social, cultural, and familial environment of the analyst, and both participants strengthen their communication. </p><p><strong>Disciplinary court. </strong>If any officer is involved in a disciplinary action, that officer seeks a member of his group to act as his "lawyer." The lawyer will represent the officer and help to clarify the situation. Likewise, management will choose an officer to act as "prosecutor" to argue the case of the disciplinary action. This interaction allows each party a fair chance to present facts. </p><p><strong>LPCA authors. </strong>Every member of the security team is required to write an article about campus security. The article is published in our digital magazine and is shared with the Campo Alegre community, including parents, students, teachers, employees, and contractors.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the month. </strong>Each month, an officer who has successfully met all objectives is awarded LPCA of the month. The objectives include staff identification, detailed knowledge of the campus, analytical prowess with regard to the operations manual, location of safety equipment, completion of duties, and adherence to the disciplinary code. The officer must demonstrate clear concise communication and common sense.</p><p><strong>LPCA of the year. </strong>This honor is awarded to the LPCA who has received the greatest number of monthly awards.</p><p><strong>Compensation. </strong>In addition to careful training, we know that humans respond well to a good salary and benefits. They feel appreciated for a job well done. We are proud to say that our LPCAs are the best paid in the country. In addition, they receive a stipend for being a university graduate, a stipend for transportation, and bonuses for work performance. The Escuela Campo Alegre community also shows appreciation through thank you notes and personal gratitude. That goes a long way in making our team feel appreciated.</p><p><strong>RESULTS</strong></p><p>Since Escuela Campo Alegre began this program of recruitment, training, supervision, daily evaluations, and professional development of analysts, management has observed both positive and negative behaviors: distractibility, obscurity, lack of discipline, lack of confidence to perform duties, inequality when working in groups, selfishness, and lying, as well as professionalism, fairness, honesty, transparency, and overall pride in the work and the institution. </p><p>Our evaluation system contributes greatly toward a successful program. A Google Doc is available so that every person on the task force can monitor his behavior and improve in areas of operation, manual details, face recognition, geographic location on campus, security equipment location on campus and security rounds. With this information available at any time, they can self-motivate and improve. The same Google Doc can show them where they stand as far as positioning and they can see what salary increase they may expect on their next evaluation. The disciplinary system tracks all mistakes made by the analyst on duty. This provides the analyst the opportunity to correct mistakes and advance in the program.</p><p>Our turnover is very low because of our evaluation system. It not only helps those who wish to advance, but it also allows others to realize, on their own, that their job performance is too low to continue.</p><p>The analysts take pride in their work and, because they can see what other analysts are achieving, they can collaborate and ask questions of those higher achievers. There are fewer missed shifts. Because the analysts work so closely together and respect each other, they are more willing to cover for a team member.</p><p>It has been arduous work that involves a great deal of discipline, ethics and morals, teaching, and faith in what we are doing. 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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Driving-a-Security-Transition.aspxDriving a Security Transition<p>​When Christopher Martini, CPP, took the wheel as Jaguar Land Rover North America’s regional manager for corporate security and business protection in 2013, he knew he had a long road ahead of him. He was the first person to serve in the role, which focused on keeping the British automotive company’s American and Canadian administrative facilities safe. Jaguar Land Rover North America had been previously owned by Ford, which provided general security functions but did not have an onsite security professional dedicated specifically to Jaguar Land Rover. After Ford sold the company, a few years passed without a leader to organize safety, security, or asset protection. “Security functions were under the stewardship of the site services facilities department but there was no functioning security department,” Martini notes.</p><p>Jaguar Land Rover North America has more than a dozen facilities, including service and sales training academies, regional offices, and driving experience centers throughout the United States and Canada. “We’re not the manufacturing company but we directly help facilitate the sale of our products and the ongoing use of our products through training dealer personnel, and importing vehicle parts and accessories,” Martini says.</p><p>After years without any organized security approach, Martini faced two distinct challenges: building a culture of security and equipping facilities with up-to-date access control and perimeter protection technology. </p><p>“It was a mature organization—people had been operating in a certain way without the influence of an organized security and safety and asset protection structure around them,” Martini explains. “Those behaviors were set because people had been here for a while, and there was a lot of organizational resistance to having a security professional start to change how people did things, even something as simple as accessing the building.”</p><p>Similarly, Jaguar Land Rover North America facilities were equipped with legacy security systems so out of date that facilities personnel had been buying spare parts from eBay because they were no longer produced or supported by the manufacturer. 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He was familiar with S2 Security Corporation from visiting its booth at ASIS International seminar and exhibits, and he ultimately decided on its platform for regional security monitoring, administration, and operations management, as well as for standardizing access control and video. </p><p>“What really guided my selection was the fact that I knew that I wasn’t going to have a tremendous ability to call upon internal resources for maintenance, upkeep, or even operation of the system, so it had to be something that was easy to train people on—resilient and very reliable—and that didn’t require constant updates to stay current with desktop and operations software,” Martini explains. The S2 system is accessed via Internet browser and does not require any dedicated client software. Martini said it was the “perfect fit” for the Jaguar Land Rover North America environment.</p><p>The new, cutting-edge infrastructure—including HID access cards and Axis cameras that integrated with S2’s Enterprise access control and NetVR video management systems—was installed at the Portland location. After that successful deployment, the solution was installed in the Irvine, California, training office; the Mahwah, New Jersey, headquarters; and a new facility in Mississauga, Canada, that opened in 2016. The New Jersey facility has an enterprise-level system that allows for round-the-clock monitoring of the other three locations.</p><p>“We do all the administration here in New Jersey, and we do monitoring for those other locations,” Martini says. “I have 24-hour staff that is interacting with the system, and any alarm or information that comes back to us requiring a response gets escalated from here out to the location.”</p><p>Martini’s responsibility to protect Jaguar Land Rover’s American and Canadian facilities and fleet of more than 900 high-end vehicles was made easier with the new technology. “The most direct benefit that I get is I now know what’s happening at my facilities,” he notes. “Prior to having this technological capability, I had to rely on people in those locations to report issues and incidents to me as they occurred. Now I have more direct visibility to what’s happening to those sites in real time, which gives me a much better sense of situational awareness to what’s really happening.”</p><p>At the remote facilities, an intrusion panel—integrated with the S2 system—allows the first employee to arrive at the facility and the last to leave the ability to deactivate or activate the alarm system with a swipe of an access control badge. After the system is armed, it will dial out to a third-party monitoring company if an alarm is triggered, as well as alert the security officer on duty at the company’s New Jersey headquarters. </p><p>Martini explains that the local monitoring company will call headquarters to discuss what action to take. “The officer starts looking for video associated with that alarm, and the alarm company will call in and ask whether it should dispatch police,” he says. “The officer can see if it’s just the new housekeeper who forgot to use the control panel, or whether there is evidence of intrusion.” Then the officer can tell the company to send police. </p><p>The officer would then go through an escalation process, which could involve reaching out to staff at headquarters  or a local site contact, depending on the situation. “Officers have a detailed escalation list as to who they need to notify about the range of things they may notice or be called about for one of those remote locations,” Martini says.</p><p>This chain of response went according to plan when someone tried to break into the company’s Irvine location. The security officer on duty in New Jersey was watching the remote video feeds and noticed a man walking around the outside of the facility after hours, trying to open the doors. The officer was able to switch the view to pull up all feeds of the site to gain better situational awareness and observed the man trying to pry open one of the patio doors with a crowbar. </p><p>“Irvine is a regional office collocated with a training center,” Martini notes. “Training centers are like really nice, clean automotive garages where we bring service technicians and train them on our cars. The first level has a nice main lobby and a couple automotive bays and things like that, and the second level is basically office space. Likely what was drawing this guy was that there was a vintage Jaguar just inside those doors.”</p><p>The man had not triggered any alarms because he hadn’t yet managed to open the door, but the security officer contacted the local alarm company and had it call the police, who responded within a minute. </p><p>“It’s not a huge incident, but the quality of the video is so excellent and the ability for the officer to quickly switch and bring up everything associated with the site and get a better sense of where the guy was located and what his target was going to be is really quite interesting to see,” Martini says.</p><h4>Culture Change</h4><p>The changes at Jaguar Land Rover North America facilities haven’t just boosted situational awareness—they have helped change the employee culture as well. While Martini was upgrading the physical security, he was also striving to get employees on board with working together to create a more secure workplace. </p><p>“It’s really difficult, in my experience, to create a controls-based environment if the environment doesn’t have good controls,” Martini explains. “It’s one thing to tell people ‘It’s important that you wear your badge, you don’t leave doors propped open.’ If the system doesn’t provide you with the information necessary to know when those problems are happening, then it’s difficult to address the behaviors.”</p><p>Understanding that employees were not used to wearing access control badges, Martini solicited employee feedback and created a team to help design the look and feel of the new badges. As part of the rebadging strategy, employees were encouraged with contests and could take selfies to use as their badge photos.</p><p>“Rather than us taking your photo and making it like getting a driver’s license, people took their own, as long as they met the criteria—it was a really fun experience,” Martini says. “It allowed people to send me the photos they were the happiest with, and my opinion is that if I want you to wear the badge, then you should be happy with the photo.”</p><p>Once the S2 system was in place, it was easy for Martini’s officers to be alerted when doors were propped open or other security protocols were not followed and make a call to the facility and correct the behavior in real time. “It sends a subtle message, not that Big Brother is out there watching, but it reinforces the behaviors you’re expecting from your employees, and lets them know that as an organization we take it seriously,” Martini says. “The messaging has been augmented by the fact that we now have an environment and infrastructure that supports the application of administrative and policy controls. That’s a huge benefit.”</p><p>It’s been almost a year since the updated S2 solution was installed at the facility in Canada, and the organization is planning a second rollout to several facilities across North America. Martini says he considers the first deployment a success—both in tightening the physical security at the facilities, and in evolving company culture. Jaguar Land Rover North America conducts pulse surveys among its employees, and Martini says that during the last two years employees’ perception of health and safety has increased. He also notes that, anecdotally, false alarms greatly decreased because employees are following protocol. “It’s a good indicator that we’re on the right path and people understand the organization is making an effort, and what we’re doing is effective,” he notes.</p><p>When he started at Jaguar Land Rover North America, Martini approached security as an amenity to the business and hoped that a stronger physical security footprint would benefit company culture—and vice versa.</p><p>“We have really talented people and we hire you to apply your talent to the work, not to be worried about security or personal safety,” Martini says. “Your job is to come in and contribute all your talent and energy to the task at hand. Because the system is providing us with intelligence about what’s happening at our sites, we can let people know that our sites are secure and we’re taking security seriously. Employees feel more secure in the workspace, they have a better understanding of what their individual responsibility is to contribute to the security program, and that reinforces the kind of culture I was trying to build.” </p><p><em>(Editor's note: At press time, Martini began a new position as an area security and safety manager for PayPal.) ​</em></p>GP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Infrastructure-Protection-Trends.aspxInfrastructure Protection Trends<p></p><p>If you fail to upgrade your Internet technologies, you’ll find yourself stuck in 1997. But if you fail to upgrade your infrastructure, you’ll find yourself stuck in 1897. It’s a well-worn joke, but it illustrates the importance of secure, well-functioning infrastructure to modern society.</p><p>Moreover, the rise of sophisticated cyberattacks on infrastructure make it an area of increasing vulnerability, experts say. As a result, the global market for critical infrastructure protection is growing, and it is projected to reach $94 billion by 2020, according to Global Industry Analysts, Inc. This demand is being driven by the increasing need to protect critical assets and prevent disruptions to normalcy due to threats, the company reports. And because critical infrastructure assets and systems are vital to the economy, disruptions or breaches can be catastrophic.</p><p>Given the stakes in play, Yves Duguay, CEO and founder of HCIWorld, sees a clear trend in infrastructure protection—a greater focus on resilience, on being prepared before an incident occurs, and on maintaining operating continuity before and after an incident. HCIWorld’s clients include airports, transportation systems, and other key infrastructure facilities.</p><p>“Resilient organizations have moved from the ‘if’ to the ‘when,’” he says. “It’s not a question of whether or not a given scenario will materialize, it’s when and how often it will be repeated, as exemplified by the viral number of cyberattacks recorded by security agencies.”</p><p>This is an important issue in the business community, because while governments do oversee and protect some critical infrastructure, much infrastructure is in the hands of the private sector. For example, in Canada, where HCIWorld is based, a recent survey found that 80 percent of the infrastructure in the energy and water sectors is privately held. The situation is similar in the United States. “Generally speaking, there is a lot more private sector involvement, on both sides of the border,” Duguay says.</p><p>By focusing on resilience and risk management in infrastructure security, companies can dem­onstrate proper due diligence in managing the range of risks they face. “This not only offers a protection of the company’s reputation, but it also reduces its legal liabilities, and possibly its insurance costs,” Duguay says. </p><p>Some forward-thinking firms have adopted infrastructure resilience strategies that include contingency and emergency plans, which are practiced and reviewed with their employees. “Resilience must become part of everyone’s job description, not only of the security department,” Duguay says. When employees understand why certain measures are taken and their own role in contingency and emergency planning, they become much more involved and committed, Duguay explains.</p><p>When a crisis does happen, communication is crucial, he adds. “The key to the success of protecting infrastructure also lies in the ability of companies, especially large ones, to involve their employees by communicating with them in real time, and providing them with accurate information and guidance during an emergency,” he explains. </p><p>Resilience can also have bottom-line financial benefits. “Activating a contingency plan quickly to resume business activities will translate into a competitive advantage for these companies,” Duguay says.  </p><p>In addition to the move toward greater resilience, another clear trend in infrastructure security is greater interconnectedness, says Jeffrey Slotnick, CPP, PSP, CSO of OR3M and president of Setracon. Slotnick has been an architect in the U.S. homeland security enterprise, including stints writing standards and managing assessments for critical infrastructure protection. </p><p>He offers the example of a computer, which may be connected to a printer, a scanner, and other hardware. It works under the “plug-and-play” concept: all equipment is integrated, and can be operated by simply turning on one switch. Right now, infrastructure protection tools are not interconnected to the level where an access camera, a door controller, and other systems are fully integrated to the plug-and-play level. “We haven’t got there yet in the security industry,” he says. </p><p>But that’s the direction that infrastructure security will be moving in the next five years, Slotnick says. The next logical step is a common operating platform, on which disparate systems will be integrated and can talk to one another. This is already happening in some smart cities, where integrated systems are becoming more common, he explains.  </p><p>There’s also a demographic driver to this trend, as the number of technology-savvy millennials increases in the workplace. “Millennials manipulate technology differently,” Slotnick says, and they will demand more integration. </p><p>However, Slotnick also cites one negative trend that continues: the fact that infrastructure facilities are often guarded by officers who are inadequately compensated and insufficiently trained. “We take a minimum wage security officer and place that officer in front of multimillion dollar infrastructure facility, and then we wonder why situations arise that may not necessarily be to our liking,” he says. </p><p>Europe has a better model, he explains. There, security officers are in a “guild profession” with a more equitable pay scale that correlates to different position levels, such as site supervisor or area manager, for example. In contrast, the modest wages in the American system means that turnover is often a problem because officers will switch companies for a 25-cent-per-hour increase.</p><p>“If I could change one thing in the security industry,” Slotnick says, “it would be that.”</p>GP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465