Suicide Bombings in Indonesia, Stabbing in Paris, CERT NZ Will Lead PaCSON, and More

Suicide Bombings in Indonesia, Stabbing in Paris, CERT NZ Will Lead PaCSON, and More
  • A suicide bombing at a police headquarters in the Indonesian city of Surabaya on Monday was carried out by a family of five riding on two motorbikes. An eight-year-old daughter survived the latest attack, police say. This attack comes after a family of six carried out three church bombings in Indonesia on Sunday, reports the BBC. The Islamic State group has claimed the attacks, which killed at least 13 people. A mother and two daughters blew themselves up at one church, while the father and two sons targeted two others in Surabaya. National police chief Tito Karnavian said they belonged to an IS-inspired network, Jemaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD). Police say the family were among hundreds of Indonesians who had returned from Syria, where IS has been fighting government forces. No details were given about the family's alleged involvement in that conflict. The bombings are the deadliest in Indonesia in more than a decade, and also left more than 40 people injured.

  • Investigators on Sunday scoured the background of a 20-year-old Frenchman born in Chechnya who killed one man and wounded four other people during a stabbing spree in central Paris, for which the Islamic State group claimed responsibility, reports France 24. According to a judicial source, the man's parents have been taken into custody for questioning, and a friend of the suspect had been arrested and taken into questioning in the eastern French city of Strasbourg. An assailant shouting "Allahu akbar" was shot dead by police in central Paris late Saturday, minutes after he attacked people near the city's main opera house. The suspect has not been named, but sources close to the inquiry say the Frenchman was on an anti-terror watchlist of suspected extremists, although he did not have a criminal record.

  • CERT NZ, New Zealand's government cybersecurity agency, was voted in as the inaugural chair of the Pacific Cyber Security Operational Network (PaCSON), according to SecurityBriefNZ. PaCSON was created in April 2018, and it is a network of CERTs and cybersecurity response officials from 14 Pacific nations, including Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Jamison Johnson, CERT NZ principal advisor and PaCSON representative, says that CERT NZ's place as the first chair of the PaCSON Executive Committee is a huge honor. Other members of the Executive Committee include Tonga as Deputy Chair and Samoa as Incoming Chair," Johnson says.

  • In other news, Teralytics, a New York-based tech company with offices in Zurich and Singapore, has developed a map that reflects exactly how, when, and where Puerto Ricans moved following Hurricane Maria by tracking data that was harvested from a sample of nearly 500,000 smartphones. According to a new survey, people using Twitter during a disaster or breaking news event are likely to be spreading misinformation. Egypt deployed security forces outside metro stations on Sunday, witnesses said, a day after more than 20 people were detained following rare protests at several metro stations by dozens of commuters angry at fare hikes. A private security guard in New York City was charged with abuse after police reviewed eyewitness video they said shows him using "excess force" on a 19-year-old shoplifter who took two pairs of Prada shoes, worth approximately $850. A Michigan fire chief checked a photo emailed to him Wednesday by his home security camera system, and he believes the blurry image shows an angel hovering over his pickup truck.