Russian Election Interference, Student Abuse Report, Technology Security Warning, Airport Scanner Improvements

Russian Election Interference, Student Abuse Report, Technology Security Warning, Airport Scanner Improvements
  • ​​Russian efforts to help elect President Trump in the 2016 election were intensely focused on exploiting racial tensions to suppress voter turnout among minorities, a campaign that proved more far-reaching and effective than previously understood, according to reports released Monday by the Senate Intelligence Committee. More than 30 million Facebook and Instagram users shared propaganda messages generated as part of a campaign by Russia's Internet Research Agency to polarize and misinform voters, according to the reports commissioned by the committee, the Los Angeles Times reports.

  • The Maryland Province Jesuits, a Catholic religious order with clergy serving throughout the Washington area and across eight states, released a list Monday of priests in the order who have been "credibly accused" of abusing children since the 1950s. The men accused of abusing minors worked for decades in high schools, colleges, churches, and other institutions, the Washington Post reports. Some of the abuse detailed in the report dates back more than half a century. But other accusations are much more recent, and the list reveals that some of the Jesuit priests were not removed from ministry until well after 2002.

  • The Czech cyber watchdog warned network operators on Monday against using Chinese software or hardware telecom equipment suppliers Huawei and ZTE, saying they posed a security threat, Reuters reports. Huawei, the world's biggest producer of telecommunications equipment, faces intense scrutiny in the West over its ties to the Chinese government and concerns its equipment could be used by Beijing for spying. The company has repeatedly denied the allegations. "China's laws...require private companies residing in China to cooperate with intelligence services, therefore introducing them into the key state systems might present a threat," Dusan Navratil, director of the Czech National Cyber and Information Security Agency, said in a statement.

  • A new scanner at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport might someday eliminate the need to unpack those quart-size bags of liquids the Chicago Tribune reports. The new computed tomography scanner at O'Hare's Terminal 1 produces three-dimensional images that Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents can view from different angles to get a better view of the contents of passengers' bags. But passengers may not see the new scanner in use until after the holidays—the TSA still needs to test it and train the employees who will operate it. If the new technology lives up to its promise, giving TSA agents a better view of bags being scanned will mean they won't have to do as many hands-on searches.