Record Number of Detained Migrant Children, Florence Approaches, Terror Insights, and More

Record Number of Detained Migrant Children, Florence Approaches, Terror Insights, and More
  • ​The number of migrant children detained in the United States has reached an all-time high  according to a new report from the New York Times. Federally contracted shelters are currently housing some 12,800 minors this month—that’s compared to 2,400 children in custody in May 2017. The increase isn’t due to more children crossing the border, but fewer children being released to live with families or sponsors. The prolonged detention has put facilities at capacity and leaves both the children and systems in place overwhelmed. The same number of children are crossing into the United States—daily from Central America—as in years past, but stricter immigration enforcement and red tape are discouraging relatives to come forward and sponsor the children. The administration announced it would triple the size of a temporary tent camp in south Texas to house 3,800 children, raising concerns of living conditions. 

  • Winds are expected to dramatically pick up tonight along the Carolina coasts in the wake of Hurricane Florence’s landfall. While the storm has slightly weakened to a Category 2, experts are warning it will be slow-moving, causing storm surges, coastal flooding, and extended rainfall similar to Hurricane Harvey in Houston last year, CNN reports. More than a million residents along the East Coast have been evacuated, and at least 800 flights have been cancelled ahead of the storm. Bloomberg also reports that some 400 manufacturing and shipping facilities are in the storm’s path, which will affect the supply chain of many industries, including the auto industry and packaged food suppliers. Storm preparation has not been without controversy—South Carolina made the controversial decision to not evacuate a medium-security prison despite a mandatory evacuation order, leaving more than 900 inmates and 100 prison staffers in an evacuation zone. And a U.S. senator claimed that $10 million of disaster relief funds was transferred to immigration enforcement operations, but officials say the money was unspent and typically used for supplies and training. 

  • A new report from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) finds that sophisticated, multi-form terrorist attacks with involvement from terrorist organizations remain the biggest threat to America, despite concerns about lone wolf-style attacks. According to CNN, the report looked at 99 terrorism attacks over the past four years around the world and found that lone wolf attacks—including vehicle ramming and stabbing—aren’t as deadly as more sophisticated attacks. And if a foreign terrorist organization is involved in the direction or even inspiration of an attack, it will result in almost 10 times as many fatalities. Attacks that involve meticulous planning to exploit vulnerabilities, including soft targets and crowded areas, also tend to result in higher death rates. Firearms remain the most fatal form of attack. 

  • In other news, some 20,000 untouched pallets of boxed water were discovered in Puerto Rico, signaling a supply chain failure. One of the members of Russian activist band Pussy Riot is in the hospital from a suspected poisoning. Almost $1 million in jewels was stolen from a Saudi princess’ hotel room at the Paris Ritz Hotel. Six people were killed in a shooting at a trucking company in Bakersfield, California. Russian bomber planes were intercepted off the coast of Alaska for the second time in a month.