Pulse Victims Sue First Responders, Violence in Yemen Threatens Red Cross, Vietnam Cyber Law Criticized, and More

Pulse Victims Sue First Responders, Violence in Yemen Threatens Red Cross, Vietnam Cyber Law Criticized, and More
  • ​Victims of the 2016 Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando have filed a lawsuit against Adam Gruler, who was working as a security guard that night. Thirty-one other police officers are being sued, but Gruler is the only one who is named in the suit. "The plaintiffs contend that Gruler and the other Orlando police officers acted too slowly and failed to protect the nightclub's patrons as the gunman, Omar Mateen, opened fire on the club and then held hostages for more than three hours inside a bathroom before he was shot and killed by police," The Washington Post reports. Originally, Gruler was hailed as a hero for his actions and was honored by the Orlando Police Department with a "Pulse Valor Award."

  • Seventy-one members of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) have been pulled out of Yemen due to rising security threats, Al Jazeera reports. About 450 ICRC employees remain in Yemen. "The aid agency urged all sides in the country's three-year war to provide security guarantees so its staff could keep running surgical, water and food assistance programmes, which it said had been 'crippled' by the partial evacuation." On April 21, an ICRC employee was killed by a gunman who opened fire on him while on his way to visit a prison.

  • Human Rights Watch is calling for Vietnam to revise cybersecurity legislation that goes before lawmakers near the end of this month. The organization says that the country's authorities are given wide discretion in the law to broadly define what should be considered "illegal" expression. "Vietnam's national laws lack meaningful protections for privacy and the provisions in the cyber security law could make it easier for the government to identify and prosecute people for their peaceful online activities," Human Rights Watch states on its website.

  • In other news, the former head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, James Wolfe, has been indicted for allegedly lying to the FBI about his relationships with three reporters. Florida has received $19.2 million in federal funding to boost its elections cybersecurity posture. Towns and cities in Connecticut are considering a request to join a self-driving car testing program, which Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed into law last year. And a record number of guns were confiscated at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport last month, according to the U.S. Transportation Security Administration. ​