North Korea May Freeze Weapons Programs, School Shootings as Domestic Terror Bill, Drones in Hurricane Recovery, and More

North Korea May Freeze Weapons Programs, School Shootings as Domestic Terror Bill, Drones in Hurricane Recovery, and More
  • ​North Korea has offered to freeze its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs to enter into talks with the United States, the Los Angeles Times reports. The South Korean spy chief, as well as the nation's top national security official, returned today from a meeting in Pyongyang with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Those officials reported that North Korea said it would halt its programs as long as the safety of the regime was "guaranteed." While there has not been any official reaction from the White House, U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted today, "The World is watching and waiting! May be false hope, but the U.S. is ready to go hard in either direction!"

  • A bill has been proposed by lawmakers in New York to treat school shootings as acts of domestic terrorism​, ABC News 10 reports. "The bill also codifies the New York State Intelligence Center, a federally authorized intelligence-gathering partnership between the FBI, CIA, State Police, Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services and local policing agencies, and adds a mandate for the Intelligence Center to prevent mass shootings." The bill also states that a house of worship or business could also be classified as a "civilian population" when a terrorist attempts to cause harm at those places. State Senator Terrance Murphy said that all "perceived violence that threatens the lives of others…must be handled in the same manner."

  • Wired reports on the use of drones in Puerto Rico to help restore power to the U.S. territory, which is still recovering from Hurricane Maria last September. The five vehicles, operated by North Carolina-based Duke energy, are used to "search for broken utility poles, downed power lines buried under vegetation, and to string new lines over rough or inaccessible terrain," according to the article. Energy professionals say the drones not only save money, but keep workers safe, because the vehicles can enter confined spaces, approach energized equipment, and work at dangerous heights.

  • In other news, a San Francisco elementary school has increased security in the wake of multiple threats against students and staff by an individual recently released from jail. Three Illinois daycare workers were arrested after giving toddlers gummy bears laced with melatonin to make them nap. And cybersecurity experts tell CSO Online that new cyber gu​idelines for businesses from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission fall short.