Moscow Plane Crash, Egyptian Militants Killed, Bollards Impale Official Cars, and More

Moscow Plane Crash, Egyptian Militants Killed, Bollards Impale Official Cars, and More
  • ​A Saratov Airlines aircraft carrying 65 passengers and six crew​ member​s crashed near Moscow Sunday shortly after takeoff, reports CNN. No distress call was reported. The plane was headed to the Russian city of Orsk when it disappeared from radar a few minutes after departing from Moscow's Domodedovo Airport, Russian state news agency Tass reported. The plane went down in Ramenskoye District, in the Moscow region. Both flight recorders from the plane were in the hands of investigators Monday. The onboard voice recorder for cockpit conversations was found Monday, and the flight data recorder registering details such as speed and altitude was recovered on Sunday. All 71 people on board were killed.

  • Sixteen militants were killed and four arrested in a major security operation, Egypt's military said on Sunday, the first casualties in a campaign aimed at crushing insurgents behind a string of attacks. Sixty-six targets, arms depots, SUVs and motor-bikes used by militants were destroyed in raids focused mainly in Sinai, but also covering the Nile Delta and the western desert, Reuters reports. President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who is seeking reelection in March, ordered the armed forces in November to defeat militants within three months after an attack on a mosque killed more than 300 people, the deadliest such incident in the Arab world's most populous country.

  • Security bollards designed to protect Australia's Parliament House from terrorist attacks have destroyed five luxury cars used by federal politicians, the Canberra Times reported. The heavy steel bollards, driven by powerful pneumatic motors, can spring out of the roadway with such force they can fling large trucks into the air. In five separate incidents since November, bollards impaled government cars, ruining them, but causing no injuries. The trouble began when new projects to fortify the Australian Parliament House interfered with the automatic operation of the bollards, requiring them to be run manually. As a result of work to upgrade the perimeter security of Parliament House, it has been necessary for a period to switch to manual operation of the retractable bollards on the Senate and House of Representatives slip roads, and human error is implicated.

  • In other news, Baltimore's acting police commissioner Darryl De Sousa announced new initiatives to address internal corruption, including the polygraphing of officers working in some units. The Canadian federal government is embarking on a pilot program that will allow people to cross borders faster if they create a digital profile on their mobile devices. The Known Traveller Digital Identity is a joint venture between the governments of Canada and the Netherlands. Puerto Rico's electric power authority reported that 400 megawatts of power generation were lost following an explosion in the northern part of Puerto Rico, just months after Hurricane Maria cut power to the entire island. Two Ohio police officers were shot and killed Saturday as they were responding to a 911 hang-up call. A man was arrested after making his way ont​o a runway at Los Angeles International Airport on Saturday night; police said he was likely under the influence of narcotics.