Marriott Breach Lawsuit, Michigan School Security, Russian Election Interference, Security Advisor Recommendation

Marriott Breach Lawsuit, Michigan School Security, Russian Election Interference, Security Advisor Recommendation
  • ​​Marriott's data breach problems are getting worse, USA Today reports. A class action lawsuit has been filed against the hotel chain, and cybersecurity experts say the whole ordeal could have been detected years ago. Hackers stole data from as many as 500 million guests who made reservations at Marriott's Starwood properties. Murphy, Falcon & Murphy, with their co-counsel Morgan & Morgan, has filed a national class action lawsuit against Marriott, alleging that the hotel chain "failed to ensure the integrity of its servers and to properly safeguard consumers' highly sensitive and confidential information." The suit does not disclose how much they are seeking in damages.

  • Some local school districts in Michigan are updating their security measures, AP reports. Since 2013, there have been five school shootings in the state of Michigan during which someone has been injured or died as a result of a gunshot, according to Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund. For example, the Alpena school district is looking at a potential bond proposal in 2019 and the district wants to use some of that money to upgrade each school with a secure-entry vestibule and a waiting area for parents to pick up their children.

  • U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis has revealed that Russia attempted to interfere in the U.S. midterm elections, ABC News reports. Russian President Vladimir Putin "tried again to muck around in our elections this last month, and we are seeing a continued effort along those lines," Mattis told an audience at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley over the weekend. The U.S. intelligence community is reviewing data from the midterm elections for any evidence of foreign interference, with a report on the probe due to the administration later this month.

  • U.S. prosecutors are expected in court Tuesday to recommend a sentence for Michael Flynn, President Trump's former national security advisor and the only White House official to be charged in the Russia investigation, the Los Angeles Times reports. Flynn pleaded guilty last December to lying to federal agents about his conversations with the Russian ambassador during the presidential transition, falsely claiming that they did not discuss U.S. sanctions. As part of his plea deal, Flynn agreed to cooperate with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, who is heading the Russia probe and has so far charged or obtained guilty pleas from 33 individuals.