MGM Sues 1,000 Vegas Shooting Victims, U.S. Border Update, Russian Arrested in U.S., and More

MGM Sues 1,000 Vegas Shooting Victims, U.S. Border Update, Russian Arrested in U.S., and More
  • MGM Resorts has filed U.S. federal lawsuits against more than 1,000 victims of last year’s mass shooting in Las Vegas to avoid liability, The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports. The company says it cannot be held liable for the 58 deaths, injuries, and other damages that occurred during its Route 91 Harvest festival in Mandalay Bay hotel, and claims against MGM parties must be dismissed. In its lawsuit, MGM argues that the event’s security vendor, Contemporary Services Corp., was protected from liability, and since MGM hired the company it should be protected as well. A 2002 act gives liability protection to companies that use antiterrorism technology that help prevent and respond to mass violence, and Contemporary Services Corp. falls in that category because its services had been certified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. MGM does not seek money from the victims but wants a judge to determine that future lawsuits are not viable. 

  • Families along the U.S.-Mexico border who have been recently reunited won’t be deported right away after a U.S. federal judge ordered a temporary hold. Lawyers from the ACLU filed a claim that the government is immediately deporting families once they have been reunited—more than 2,500 migrant children were separated from their parents—which does not give the organization the chance to meet and represent families looking to claim asylum. As of last week, all 57 eligible children under the age of 5 were reunified with parents—unless the parents had already been deported or have criminal records. The government now must reunify the rest of the children by July 26. 

  • A 29-year-old Russian woman living in Washington, D.C., who attended American University and founded pro-gun group Right to Bear Arms has been charged with acting as a Russian agent, according to findings by the U.S. Department of Justice. Maria Butina is accused of operating under the deputy head of Russia’s Central Bank—which was sanctioned by the U.S. Treasury Department earlier this year—and worked with U.S. citizens to influence American politics and infiltrate the National Rifle Association. Butina allegedly tried to develop “back channel” lines of communication with American politicians. 

  • In other news, Amazon is facing trouble during its annual Prime Day sale—its website was nonfunctional much of the day yesterday, and almost 1,800 workers in Europe went on strike to protest poor working conditions. Crab meat from Venezuela is sickening people in the United States. Lava is still flowing in Hawaii two months after its Kilauea volcano erupted. The most recent incident involved a lava bomb striking a tour boat, injuring 23 people. A bipartisan initiative is raising awareness of campaign hacking and election cybersecurityA paragliding protester was arrested near a Trump golf resort in Scotland when the president was playing. ​