Japan Floods, TSA Agents Can't be Sued, Foreign Acquisition Security Concerns, and More

Japan Floods, TSA Agents Can't be Sued, Foreign Acquisition Security Concerns, and More
  • ​​At least 200 people are dead and dozens more still missing in the wake of record-breaking flooding in Hiroshima and Okayama over the past week. Evacuations continue to be ordered for other areas in western Japan as more rivers overflowed, dikes collapsed, and landslides inundated thousands of homes with floodwater. Tens of thousands of rescue workers are involved in the recovery effort, searching besieged homes in the region, and millions of evacuated citizens either remain homeless or are making their way back to their neighborhoods. Those that have returned to their homes have little to no access to supplies due to still-clogged roads and suspended cargo and delivery services. 

  • U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers are immune from liability claims, a federal court ruled. TSA screeners are not considered investigative or law enforcement officers and are shielded from liability under the Federal Tort Claims Act, leaving mistreated fliers with few legal options. The case was raised after a woman sued for false arrest and imprisonment after being randomly selected for additional screening, which she objected to. She was held by TSA agents for 18 hours. 

  • Some foreign investors in U.S. acquisitions can pose national security concerns due to giving those investors access to emerging technology or critical military locations, a new ​U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report finds  The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), which reviews foreign acquisitions and mergers may not do enough to detect such high-risk partnerships. "Without assessing resources needed to address its CFIUS workload and risks from foreign investment in emerging technologies or in proximity to critical military locations, and ensuring its policies and processes clearly reflect the issues facing the department, DOD is at risk of being unable to respond to evolving national security concerns,” the report notes.

  • In other news, the U.S. Senate voted that President Trump will need congressional approval before imposing tariffs on other nations due to national security concerns. A Nevada execution was halted after the companies behind a new lethal injection concoction raised concerns about how the drugs were obtained. Utah’s online voter database is being hacked more than a billion times a day due to the high-profile campaign of Mitt Romney. Mexico’s new president canceled the country’s plans to buy eight military helicopters from the United States. A police officer who stood aside while an intoxicated man berated a woman for wearing a Puerto Rico shirt in Illinois has resigned. Twitter will be removing tens of millions of fake accounts today—about 6 percent of its users. The U.S. House Judiciary Committee hasn’t held a hearing on the legality of DHS actions in more than three years. DHS has awarded $1.5 million towards developing algorithms to get people through airport security more quickly. A class action lawsuit was filed against a Missouri hospital after a healthcare data breach earlier this year affected more than 60,000 people. ​