French Airport Attack, U.S. Intelligence Hearing, IoT Hacking, and More

French Airport Attack, U.S. Intelligence Hearing, IoT Hacking, and More
  • ​​​​An assailant snatched a firearm from a military officer in the south terminal of the Orly airport in France on Saturday. The attacker was then shot and killed by members of a special army patrol, according to Bloomberg. The incident, which took place in the public area of the airport, before security screening, is leading the debate in the current French presidential election with both candidates—Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen—vowing to increase security efforts.
     
  • The U.S. House of Representatives' Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence will hold a public hearing today on allegations that Russia influenced the U.S. Presidential election. The directors of the FBI and the National Security Agency are scheduled to testify, according to Reuters. The hearing will also address the allegation of wiretapping during the election. The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), said that "there is still no evidence that the Obama administration wiretapped Trump Tower, as President Trump claimed, even after the Department of Justice provided to the committee documents related to the allegation on Friday," NPR reports.
     
  • A recent report by Tripwire found that 96 percent of IT security professionals expect to see an increase in IoT attacks in 2017. Of those surveyed, 51 percent said that they don't feel prepared for "security attacks that abuse, exploit, or maliciously leverage insecure IoT devices."
     
  • In other news: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued requests for proposals to build a fence along the U.S.-Mexico border. The requirements include a height of 30 feet (9 meters) and the wall facing the United States should be "aesthetically pleasing in color." The German government raised its cyber attack alert level to "heightened readiness" in advance of parliamentary elections. Officials in Beijing are using facial recognition technology in one of its busiest public toilets. The measure, according to the government, is needed to prevent theft of toilet paper. Those patrons who visit the toilet too frequently will be denied entry.