Fifth Boy Rescued from Cave, World Cup ID Loophole, Millions Evacuated in Japan, and More

Fifth Boy Rescued from Cave, World Cup ID Loophole, Millions Evacuated in Japan, and More
  • Rescuers in northern Thailand brought at least one boy out of the flooded cave system Monday, according to CNN. He is one of 12 boys from a youth soccer team known as the Wild Boars that went missing with their coach more than two weeks ago. Last Monday they were discovered on a narrow rock shelf deep within the flooded cave system. Four boys were rescued on Sunday. The second evacuation attempt started at 11:00 a.m. local time after rescue workers rested and refilled supplies. Rescuers need to hold the boys' oxygen tanks in front of them as they swim pencil-like through submerged holes. Following this section of the cave, the boys are handed over to specialist rescue teams, who assist them through the remainder of the cave, much of which they can wade through. Rescuers are racing to beat the next downpour, which could further complicate efforts to remove the boys and their coach. The rescue mission has been a huge operation, led by the Royal Thai Navy's SEAL unit, and supported by a cast of hundreds. Among those are U.S. military partners, British cave diving experts, and rescue workers from Australia, China, and other countries.

  • Fans of England's football team discovered a loopho​le​ that allowed them to get into Russia for Saturday's World Cup game without a visa or match ticket, according to the Telegraph. Supporters wanting to make the trip needed either a visa to enter the country or a special World Cup Fan ID, introduced by Russian authorities just for the tournament. But the visa would take too long to process while a Fan ID was thought to be only obtainable accompanied by a match ticket bought in advance. But supporters discovered they could get the Fan ID simply by submitting online a ticket stub number for any World Cup match, including ones that already took place. With ticket stubs posted on social media sites by proud supporters, England fans wanting to travel to Russia needed only to copy down the ticket numbers and submit those to get a Fan ID in minutes. Once in Russia, they bought match tickets on the black market.

  • The death toll from torrential rain and landslides in western Japan rose to 81 people on Sunday, with dozens still missing after more than 2,000, temporarily stranded in the city of Kurashiki, were rescued, reports the Weather Network. Evacuation orders were in place for nearly 2 million people and landslide warnings were issued in many prefectures. In hard-hit western Japan, emergency services and military personnel used helicopters and boats to rescue people from swollen rivers and buildings, including a hospital. Scores of staff and patients, some still in their pajamas, were rescued from the isolated Mabi Memorial Hospital in boats rowed by members of Japan's Self Defense Forces. A city official said 170 patients and staff had been evacuated while public broadcaster NHK later said about 80 people were still stranded.
     
  • In other news, the government of Turkey dismissed more than 18,000 state employees under an emergency decree for alleged links to terrorism groups; the dismissals include nearly 9,000 police officers, 6,000 members of the military, and hundreds of teachers and academics. British police launched a murder investigation after the woman who was exposed to nerve agent Novichok died on Sunday. Sudan's official news agency reported that South Sudan's warring sides have reached an agreement on security arrangements amid talks on a peace deal to end a five-year civil war. Hundreds of Jimmy Buffett fans with tickets did not get into a concert at Pennsylvania's KeyBank Pavilion because of delays in a security line. The Smithsonian Institution submitted a proposal to close gaps in existing fencing and reduce the number of pedestrian entrances from 13 to three at the National Zoo. The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is recruiting thousands of transportation security officers, canine handlers, and other workers, because airport passenger lines are at all-time historic highs.