Facial Recognition at LAX, One Million Evacuated for Hurricane Florence, Chinese Human Rights Violations, and More

Facial Recognition at LAX, One Million Evacuated for Hurricane Florence, Chinese Human Rights Violations, and More
  • A new facial recognition technology deployed at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is getting mixed reviews from U.S. officials and privacy advocates. The technology, installed by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), is designed to streamline passenger processing at airports by matching faces to images in a government database to check whether they are verified travelers. "It has the potential to speed up the line, as flyers won't need a boarding pass or ID check to go through security, but critics say facial recognition doesn't work the same for everyone," CBS News reports. A test-run of the facial recognition system by the American Civil Liberties Union incorrectly matched 28 members of Congress with people who had been arrested for committing a crime. Still, CBP Commissioner Kevin McAllenan called the technology "mature" and "ready" for larger deployment across the United States. "The facial recognition is very accurate. Even an older photo we are very high match rates. Ninety-nine percent plus if we have a photograph of that traveler," McAleenan told CBS.

  • At least one million people in the eastern United States have been evacuated in preparation for Hurricane Florence, expected to make landfall on Friday in the southeast. CNN reports states of emergency have been declared in four states—North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland—and governors are urging citizens to prepare for the storm, which will bring heavy rains and high winds throughout the week. "The storm is expected to pick up speed, strengthening to near Category 5 strength within the next 24 to 36 hours...It is expected to be an 'extremely dangerous major hurricane,'" according to the National Hurricane Center.

  • The United States is considering imposing sanctions against China for its detention of Muslim minorities in large internment camps, The New York Times reports. The sanctions would specifically be targeted at Beijing senior officials and companies. "The economic penalties would be one of the first times the Trump administration has taken action against China because of human rights violations. United States officials are also seeking to limit American sales of surveillance technology that Chinese security agencies and companies are using to monitor Uighurs throughout northwest China," according to The Times. If enacted, the sanctions would mark a shift in U.S. President Donald Trump's resistance of punishing China for its human rights record.

  • In other news, FBI Director Christopher Wray told CBS This Morning that the Bureau has made "about 120" terrorism-related arrests in the last year. A dealer at a Maryland casino has been charged with one count of conspiracy after being accused of cheating. And security researchers have found 24 iOS applications that surreptitiously share user location data. ​