Cloud Security

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Seminar-Sneak-Peek---Moving-to-the-Cloud-Repositions-Security.aspxSeminar Sneak Peek: Moving to the Cloud Repositions SecurityGP0|#91bd5d60-260d-42ec-a815-5fd358f1796d;L0|#091bd5d60-260d-42ec-a815-5fd358f1796d|Cybersecurity;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a43444652016-08-16T04:00:00Z<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">On Tuesday, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., three speakers will discuss how Microsoft Corporation is moving from three brick-and-mortar oper</span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">ations centers in various locations around the world to one cloud-based fusion center. They will lead session 3117, “Virtual Security Operations Centers” (VSOCs).</span></p><p> The transition “is a work in progress,” says Michael Foynes, senior director, global operations, at Microsoft. He expects the new VSOC to be completed next year. Traditionally, he says, “we have been operating at the speed of security.” But cloud services and tools offer a different way of visualizing data, deploying software applications, and leveraging social media.  “It will allow us to operate at the speed of business,” he adds.</p><p> The impetus for this change came from the security group. Michael Howard, Microsoft’s CSO, challenged the group to adopt a “mobile-first/cloud-first strategy,” which is also a company strategy, says Foynes. </p><p> In the traditional global operations centers, he notes,“We were operating in a 99 percent reactive mode.” Moving to a VSOC “enables us to be 99 percent proactive and to get in front of the business.” The difference, he explains, moves security from “waiting for something to happen to becoming an integral part of the business planning—adapting to emerging markets and building a holistic business strategy.”</p><p> While there are direct cost savings to this move, Foynes considers them to be insignificant in light of the improved level of readiness as security engages in planning and partnering across the business, moving its response capabilities to the remaining one percent. “The planning and readiness of a company has direct effect on shareholder perception and value,” he says.</p><p> Foynes admits that the transition has been a journey, and a lot of time has been invested in educating employees, “getting people to buy into something that they can’t really visualize.” The risks, he adds, are not in the new technology, operating models, processes, and procedures.  But the necessary shift in mindset “changes how we communicate and engage,” he says. The goal of the education, then, is to foster integration among the groups so they understand what the change means to them, to the business, and to their partnerships. </p><p> “It really changes our role,” says Foynes. “We still have a responsibility for life safety and security, but it enables a different level of engagement with the business—and that’s really exciting!”</p><p> Foynes will be joined in this session by speakers Ray O’Hara, CPP, AS Solutions; and Brian Tuskan, Microsoft Corporation. </p>

Cloud Security

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Seminar-Sneak-Peek---Moving-to-the-Cloud-Repositions-Security.aspx2016-08-16T04:00:00ZSeminar Sneak Peek: Moving to the Cloud Repositions Security
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/New-Data-Rules.aspx2016-08-01T04:00:00ZNew Data Rules
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Operating-Blind.aspx2016-03-01T05:00:00ZOperating Blind
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Privacy-Shield-Is-Here--What-That-Means-For-Your-Company.aspx2016-02-09T05:00:00ZPrivacy Shield Is Here—What This Means For Your Company
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Big-Data.aspx2016-02-01T05:00:00ZBook Review: Big Data
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/On-the-Record.aspx2016-01-14T05:00:00ZOn the Record
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Conducir-hacia-el-desastre.aspx2015-07-08T04:00:00ZConducir hacia el desastre
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Building-Cyber-Awareness.aspx2015-05-18T04:00:00ZBuilding Cyber Awareness
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Passing-the-Biometrics-Test.aspx2015-03-01T05:00:00ZPassing the Biometrics Test
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Chain-Reaction.aspx2015-01-01T05:00:00ZChain Reaction
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/the-password-problem.aspx2014-12-01T05:00:00ZThe Password Problem
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Cyber-Crusaders.aspx2014-11-01T04:00:00ZCyber Crusaders
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/QA-What-are-Today's-Biggest-Malware-Challenges.aspx2014-10-01T04:00:00ZQ&A: What Are Today's Biggest Malware Challenges?
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/nsas-actions-threaten-us-economy-and-internet-security-new-report-suggests-0013601.aspx2014-07-29T04:00:00ZNSA's Actions Threaten U.S. Economy and Internet Security, New Report Suggests
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/cloud-technology-0012811.aspx2013-10-01T04:00:00ZCloud Technology
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Computing-in-the-Cloud.aspx2013-10-01T04:00:00ZComputing in the Cloud
https://sm.asisonline.org/migration/Pages/computing-cloud-0012789.aspx2013-10-01T04:00:00ZComputing in the Cloud
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/experts-weigh-2013-cyberthreats-0011218.aspx2012-12-25T05:00:00ZExperts Weigh In On 2013 Cyberthreats
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/cloud-security-implications-file-sharing-site-case-0010835.aspx2012-11-07T05:00:00ZCloud Security Implications in File Sharing Site Case
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/hacking-tools-fuel-russian-black-market-0010836.aspx2012-11-07T05:00:00ZHacking Tools Fuel Russian Black Market

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Hacked-Again.aspxBook Review: Hacked Again<p>​ScottSchober.com Publishing; ScottSchober.com, 202 pages; $34.95</p><p>If you are seeking useful security advice on how to mitigate or prevent cybersecurity breaches, <em>Hacked Again</em> is a good resource to have in your library. </p><p>Author Scott Schober, a business owner and wireless technology expert, discusses pitfalls that all businesses face and the strategies used to mitigate cyberattacks. He discusses malware, email scams, identity theft, social engineering, passwords, and the Dark Web. </p><p> Another important concept is having systems in place to enable information access both as the data breach is occurring and afterwards. Most companies’ IT departments will have an incident response team; however, the individual user needs to know what to do when breached. Schober offers advice for that. </p><p> The abundance of personal information on social media is another concern of the author’s. He states that we are twice as likely to be victims of identity theft from these sites. He also reminds us that no matter how we try to eliminate risk, we’re never completely protected from a cyberattack. </p><p> Many cybersecurity books are more advanced, but Schober’s style is easy to follow, and he explains concepts and theories without confusing the reader. When concepts become overly technical, he incorporates scenarios to explain what these technical terms mean. Students, IT professionals, and novices would benefit from this book. They will learn that everyone must be aware of cybersecurity and stay on top of evolving trends.</p><p>--</p><p><em><strong>Reviewer: Kevin Cassidy</strong> is a professor in the security, fire, and emergency management department at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He is a member of ASIS.</em><br></p>GP0|#91bd5d60-260d-42ec-a815-5fd358f1796d;L0|#091bd5d60-260d-42ec-a815-5fd358f1796d|Cybersecurity;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/How-to-Build-a-Culture-of-Security.aspxHow to Build a Culture of Security<p>​<span style="line-height:1.5em;">“</span><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Security is everyone’s business” may be a popular truism in the industry, but how many security managers can honestly say this philosophy is practiced by their companies? Some organizations have regular incidents in which employees simply disregard security rules and regulations. Sometimes, even the leaders of a company will disobey security and safety rules out of a sense of entitlement—these rules are for employees, not executives.</span></p><p>These lapses can be costly. It is only when everyone associated with the company adheres to and executes security rules and practices on a daily basis that a firm can credibly claim that it maintains a true culture of security.    </p><p>To determine whether a company encourages an effective security culture, company leaders should start by determining whether it adheres to the appropriate best practices. The security department should develop and communicate security rules, practices, and procedures to employees, contractors, visitors, and vendors. Executives must lead by example and follow all security practices and procedures. Employees must take care of their security responsibilities at work, such as locking their work spaces and computers or asking to see a badge of a person in a secure work area instead of simply holding open an outer perimeter door for a stranger to be polite.   </p><p>If an organization follows most of these procedures, it maintains a robust culture of security. If not, the best practice advice and solutions stated below can be used by security leaders to strengthen security awareness in their companies and develop a culture of security. ​</p><h4>The Assessment</h4><p>A culture of security can only be built on a solid foundation. And that foundation is an effective security program. </p><p>However, if the security program is perceived as inconsistent or unprofessional, an initiative to build a culture of security around it will be doomed from the start. Thus, it is imperative to conduct an initial assessment of the security program to evaluate past security practices and present security operations. </p><p>The assessment must include, but should not be limited to, the following methodology:</p><ul><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Conduct interviews with security staff to determine past practices and to engage them in the assessment process.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review and evaluate existing documents regarding past security missions.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review and evaluate security staff job descriptions.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review and evaluate security current procedures, processes, and guidelines. </span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review and evaluate the security budget to ensure that it is in line with the mission, and that funded programs are not obsolete.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Spend time working directly with all security staff to obtain first-hand knowledge regarding daily duties. Get to know your people.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review and evaluate any compliance tasks that have been assigned to security.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review, evaluate, and coordinate security requirements with heads of departments with security cross-functionality. Conduct collaborative meetings with other department heads and staff on their opinions of security.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Obtain input from executive management on its vision of security.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Define and document your company-specific security missions.</span><br></li><li><span style="line-height:1.5em;">Review the security requirements within these missions and analyze them for potential mission creep.<br></span><span style="line-height:1.5em;"> </span></li></ul><h4>The Blueprint</h4><p>Once past and present security operations have been assessed, organization leaders can plan for the future by improving and refining, based upon the factual analysis that has already been completed.</p><p>The first part of the blueprint process is to develop missions and objectives. This includes enlisting management for direction and involvement and establishing security goals and engaging security team members in ways to accomplish them. This part of the process also includes documenting security mission statements and assigning a leader to each one. These leaders must be capable and willing.</p><p>The second part of the blueprint pro­cess is to standardize operations and document these procedures in a manual of operations. This manual will serve as a central repository of security standard operating procedures and processes that cover core duties and responsibilities throughout the company. </p><p>Once the assessment is completed and the blueprint is in place, security managers must ensure that key attributes of the program are successfully maintained. These attributes include consistent pro­fessionalism, first-rate training and com­munications, a commitment to the program from upper management, and procedures designed to address violations.​</p><h4>Professionalism</h4><p>Professionalism is a crucial component of a strong security culture. The professional security staff and security officers should be a model for the organization’s general population. High standards of conduct should be set; staff and officers should be evaluated; and problems should be weeded out. Most important, security department leaders should live those high standards to set an example for others to follow. </p><p>Specific best practices can ensure that staff members and officers consistently project a strong level of professionalism to other company personnel. One of these is presence. Uniforms, if worn, should be consistent. Officers should engage all persons entering the facility with eye contact. Officers should not be texting or talking on their cell phones, or congregating in an area to smoke and joke.             </p><p>Security leaders must also be careful to prevent “mission creep,” or assigning nonsecurity duties to security personnel. This may distract security staffers from their core duties, to the detriment of the organization’s security culture.  </p><p>For example, one company used the security department to conduct security training as well as training in legal issues, compliance, and ethics. Security’s training duties also included tracking of annual requirements for all of the compliance-based training, for both employees and nonemployees. The two training avenues, employee and nonemployee, were not standardized between departments. Because of the lack of standardization, there were two completely different methods of administering, developing, and tracking training.   </p><p>In this case, the solution was to clearly define the security and human resources missions at the company. Once defined, human resources assumed control of the entire company training program and standardized the administration of training. Security was responsible only for content of any security-related training.​</p><h4>Training</h4><p>A strong security culture requires an effective training program for both existing and future security personnel. In addition, the process should ensure that security personnel are cross-trained in security position responsibilities and missions, to eliminate the potential for gaps in coverage should a critical team member be unavailable. </p><p>For example, if a company’s security missions are asset protection, compliance, and physical access control, the manual of operations would contain a section of step-by-step procedures and guidelines for each. This would allow the asset protection specialist to cover for the physical access control specialist for certain tasks, such as issuing badges, instead of waiting for the access control specialist to return. </p><p>In addition, companies should pay close attention to the processes and standards for granting and tracking access that are documented in the manual of operations. This can be an issue if companies have manual, cumbersome, or archaic methods for granting access. At many companies, this is an area that needs to be addressed. The granting of physical access should be automated to an electronic format.​</p><h4>Communication</h4><p>Communication is one of the critical keys to success in any security program, and it will be part of every component of the program. From the initial assessment of the program to the final phases of the implementation of blueprint plans, all affected parties should be kept informed and aware of the security program and how it will impact their operations at work.  </p><p>One company initiated a report that was sent twice a month via e-mail with the facts of any security incidents, so executives could track important issues. This communication also allowed security to remain within the scope of the executives while maintaining a successful program. As security expanded and implemented new initiatives, these were included in the bimonthly report. </p><p>For their part, the executives of the firm should be involved and engaged early on in the communications effort. Security should offer concise presentations, such as a PowerPoint presentation, that explain how the company benefits from the security program, be it through incident prevention or the preparedness to react and minimize negative impact to the company’s operations. Security goals, objectives, operations, procedures, and mission statements should be effectively communicated across the corporate footprint. Executives should understand the security role in their company and communicate their support for security programs to all company employees.  </p><p>Within the chain of command, the security leader must develop a system of communication to keep executives aware of the challenges faced by the security department and of the programs currently being used to protect the company’s physical assets. For example, at one company I worked at, security mandated monthly luncheon meetings with staff.</p><p>Company executives were also invited to these meetings, which they attended periodically. I documented each of these meetings in formal memoranda, including progress made on issues from the prior month, issues resolved, and problems currently being addressed. These memos were sent up the chain of command for executive review.  </p><p>Annual security awareness training is another effective communications tool. By delivering accurate, updated, and simple instructions regarding security rules, policies, and procedures, the company can effectively ensure that its workforce has been periodically exposed to security standards and the roles and responsibilities in daily operations. Security awareness posters that are updated quarterly can also help in communication efforts.   </p><p> Finally, do not underestimate the power of word of mouth. For any company, there is no stronger security tool than having a workforce that is security- minded and well informed of current security policies, procedures, and daily practices. ​</p><h4>Violations</h4><p>Even with a well-established culture of security, violations of an organization’s security policies will occur.   </p><p>There are slips and breaches even in the most secure environments—some caused by intentional acts; some unintentionally, through malaise or misfortune. And while the people who work for an organization are its greatest asset, they also can be its greatest vulnerability if they decide to inflict harm. They know how the organization operates, and they can circumvent the most sophisticated security systems.  </p><p>For private industry, the enforcement of security program policies requires a company to be fair, firm, and consistent. Take, for example, a company that has a clear security rule that all visitors must be escorted by the company representative who is responsible for the visitor while on premises. If a visitor is found roaming around by himself in a secure area, the employee who brought the visitor to the property should be disciplined.  </p><p>And the discipline should be consistent, whether the employee is the CEO or the janitor. The enforcement should be documented and tracked, to monitor patterns of behavior. If the violation is severe enough that it results in a loss of property or affects employee safety, the matter should be referred to the violator’s manager for evaluation and possible further action. </p><p>Consistent and fair enforcement of the rules across the entire organization will further solidify a culture of security. It will demonstrate that security matters to the organization, and that it plans to ensure that the rules are followed. To expand on an earlier example, if the CEO forgets his or her access badge and either goes home and gets it or signs for a temporary one, the standard is set at the highest level of the company.  </p><p>In the end, success in developing a culture of security at your company will mean the organization has established a robust, comprehensively assessed, and documented security program across the enterprise. Executive leaders are meaningfully engaged, and everyone is educated in the program’s components and follows them. </p><p>--<br></p><p><em><strong>Thomas Trier</strong> served for 25 years as a special agent of the FBI, where he attained the rank of assistant special agent in charge in the intelligence branch of the FBI’s Washington Field Office. Trier has also served as the leader of corporate security for a Midwestern electrical transmission-only utility company. 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