https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Multiple-Fatalities-In-Texas-School-Shooting.aspxGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465Multiple Fatalities in Texas School Shooting0

 

 

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/May-2018-Industry-News.aspxGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465May 2018 Industry News

 

 

https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Banks-Balk-on-Bud.aspxGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465Banks Balk on Bud2018-05-01T04:00:00Z
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Emergency-Planning-for-Nuclear-Power-Plants-.aspxGP0|#21788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f;L0|#021788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f|National Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465Book Review: Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants 2018-05-01T04:00:00Z
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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Guns-and-Security-The-Risks-of-Arming-Security-Officers.aspxGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465Guns and Security: The Risks of Arming Security Officers2016-11-21T05:00:00Z

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https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Banks-Balk-on-Bud.aspxBanks Balk on BudGP0|#cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8;L0|#0cd529cb2-129a-4422-a2d3-73680b0014d8|Physical Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<p>​When seasoned security manager and longtime ASIS International member Brian Gouin started working as a consultant and virtual security manager for a medical marijuana production facility in Maryland, he certainly had some questions about the security challenges that the new gig might pose.  </p><p>Would external theft be a problem?  He had no experience in this sector, and dark visions of criminal cartels stormtrooping the facility to steal product occasionally crossed his mind. Luckily, that never happened.</p><p>"External theft has really not been a big problem. Surprisingly, there has not been a lot of that," says Gouin, who has spent nearly 30 years in the security industry and is currently owner of Strategic Design Services, a firm specializing in security design and project management services.</p><p>Still, the marijuana production facility did employ armed guards, because it held product that was worth at least $5 million. "That's more dollar value than 99 percent of banks in the state," Gouin explains. And since marijuana is so easy to sell, that product can be considered almost the equivalent of cash, he adds.   </p><p>But unlike external theft, internal theft was a problem. Employees sometimes helped themselves to a bit of product "to go" when leaving the facility for the day. Finding ways to screen workers on the way out was difficult. Complicating this matter is that keeping track of the on-hand marijuana supply can be a complex task. "You can't inventory it the way you inventory other products. You have to dry the plant; when you dry the plant, it loses weight," Gouin explains.  </p><p>And working with certain company employees was an unusual experience, even for a veteran security consultant well-accustomed to adjusting to different types of office cultures.  "It's so unique because of the type of person working there. Most of these people five years ago were running from the cops and making this stuff in their basement," Gouin says. "They are naturally distrusting of security."  </p><p>Overall, many of the facility's biggest security challenges stemmed from the fact that it is a nearly all-cash business. The ramifications of this are many. For instance, cash at a thriving marijuana business can accumulate quickly; but when it comes time to deposit the money earned, banks generally do not want to accept huge currency bundles, which can result in scrutiny from federal regulators, Gouin explains.</p><p>Given this, many marijuana businesses are forced to keep significant cash on hand. Some outgoing expenses, like compensation for day workers and certain bills, can be paid in cash, Gouin explains. Much of the rest can be deposited in smaller amounts that are spread out, so the bank will accept them. Of course, transiting large amounts of cash can also be risky, so the operation bought and used an armored vehicle, described by Gouin as "a small vanny-type thing."</p><p>Still, in one way the business that Gouin works for is lucky—it found a local bank that will take its money.  </p><p>Because U.S. federal law still includes marijuana on its Schedule I list of illegal substances, no large "tier one" bank will do business with cannabis companies now, says Joshua Laterman, CEO and founder, National Association of Cannabis Businesses (NACB). This is the "black letter of the law" that means that banks can be charged with crimes like money laundering if funds they have accepted from cannabis companies are mixed with other funds and enter the U.S. federal wire deposit system. This could lead to a federal indictment. </p><p>"No tier one bank enters the sector unless the law changes or some type of [exception] is put into place, like a safe harbor," Laterman says. "There is no cure, full stop."</p><p>This is a significant problem, given the growth and revenue-generating power of the cannabis industry. Going into 2018, nine states and Washington, D.C., had legalized marijuana outright; for medical purposes, marijuana is legal in 29 states and D.C. This year, at least 12 states are poised to consider marijuana legalization; Vermont already did so in January. On the whole, the industry generated $7 billion in revenue in the last 12 months, and this figure is expected to rise to $10 billion this year, according to NACB.</p><p>Given this revenue generation, some local banks (like the one working with Gouin's facility) and credit unions have tried to step in and fill in the vacuum. "It's the only show in town right now," Laterman says. These local banks often charge an extra compliance fee, and they usually just provide an account and some checks, without offering more involved services like credit cards. On the whole, these banks believe that the potential reward is worth the potential risk, and that working with local business is "in service of their mission." </p><p>"It's all very hyper-local," Laterman says. "They do it in a very personal way."</p><p>Nonetheless, these local banks usually cap the amount of deposited funds at $250,000, the limit that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) will insure. All things considered, there are not nearly enough of these smaller banks willing to accommodate all the revenue. "It's like trying to handle a two-liter soda with a Dixie cup," Laterman says.  </p><p>Across the northern border, no such problem exists. Canada has legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes throughout the country, and banks and other financial institutions have no problem working in the industry. "You're seeing investment banks, you're seeing accounting firms, and you're seeing law firms who will not do any transactions in the United States, but they are doing a lot in Canada," Laterman explains.</p><p>However, back in the United States, it is possible that there will be some movement on the legal issue in the near future. Some analysts have said that if more states continue to legalize marijuana, it will simply not be tenable for the country to have two sets of applicable law. Congress will have to act and change the banking laws to allow for an exception, so that a licensed marijuana distributor can use the banking system.</p><p>Moreover, what may help drive an effort for a solution is the U.S. government's realization that an industry generating billions in revenue without a banking and finance structure to support it could turn into a security nightmare. </p><p>"The money needs a place to be put, and there's not enough places to put it in. That's a growing public safety risk," Laterman says. California, he adds, holds some promise as a potential solution driver. As part of that state's legalization effort, officials set up a high-powered working group to address the legal issues. "It's a great effort; they are getting great people around the table," Laterman says.</p><p>He adds that NACB, which describes itself as the only self-regulatory organization (SRO) in U.S. cannabis, will continue its work of professionalizing the industry with credentialing, licensing, education, and other such programs. "We need to address the trust and information gaps, and better understand who the players are," Laterman explains. </p><p>Meanwhile, security managers who are curious about what it is like to work in the U.S. cannabis industry may want to check out The Marijuana Project, a novel published by Gouin (under the pen name Brian Laslow) that was in part inspired by his experiences in the industry. </p><p>In the book, security expert Sam Burnett, a conservative family man who runs a security program at a medical marijuana production facility, wrestles with the moral issues of working with the drug while he navigates the dangerous plot twists and turns that the thriller storyline takes him through. Although the book is fiction, the various industry issues and scenarios that the main character, a security expert, is involved with may be of educational value.</p><p>As for the real-life Gouin, who initially wondered if working in the cannabis sector would tarnish his professional reputation, he now says his experience was a positive one for his business: "It gave me another niche." And so his advice for fellow security managers who are interested in following his lead is "go for it"—as long as they do their due diligence beforehand.</p><p>"You have to understand the quirks of the industry," he says. ​</p>
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Book-Review---Emergency-Planning-for-Nuclear-Power-Plants-.aspxBook Review: Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants GP0|#21788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f;L0|#021788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f|National Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<p>​Published by Routledge; crcpress.com; 362 pages; $105.</p><p>Starting with a sound historical platform, <em>Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants </em>prepares the reader to understand the complex nature and evolution of emergency preparedness requirements for nuclear power plants. The author focuses on the technical basis for nuclear emergency planning and provides the reader with a good understanding of issues and risks from a radiological dose perspective. He also leaves room to apply emergency management principles, such as fire and security, that also play a role in response planning. </p><p>The book explains how certain directions taken by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission have helped shape the industry abroad. A key example is a discussion on reactor consequence analysis and the probabilistic risk assessment that is used widely across the industry. The author's focus is on U.S. regulations, although one could argue that difference in regulation today across countries is not significant, thus increasing the relevance of the book to industry emergency managers around the world. </p><p>The discussion centers on emergency planning considerations that address the issues associated with two reactor types—pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors—that are prevalent in the United States. Some risks attributed to other reactor types are not fully addressed in the book.</p><p>By effectively deploying mitigation strategies developed since the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011, the expected radiological dose from large-scale nuclear accidents can be significantly reduced. The author provides good explanations of all aspects of emergency planning. However, too much detail in some sections might confuse the reader. Still, this book is a must-read for all nuclear industry emergency planning managers.</p><p><em>Reviewer: Dan McArthur has more than 30 years of experience in the nuclear industry and now serves as senior strategist at Bruce Power, where he focuses on regulatory and government affairs pertaining to emergency management policy. He is a member of the Canadian Standards Association providing technical input and guidance on emergency preparedness requirements for nuclear power plants in Canada.</em></p>
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Certification-Profile---Douglas-Beaver,-CPP.aspxCertification Profile: Douglas Beaver, CPPGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<p>Douglas Beaver, CPP, was a police officer with the Montgomery County Police Department in Maryland, when he started his own security and investigations services business on the side. As the business grew, he eventually had to choose between continuing in law enforcement or embarking on the entrepreneurial path. He took the leap.</p><p>For many, transitioning from a military or law enforcement career into the private sector can be an unsettling and daunting experience. Beaver tackled this challenge by researching the relationship of law enforcement to private security firms. During his research, he discovered the American Society for Industrial Security—now ASIS International—and he sought to learn more about the opportunities ASIS offers. Understanding the value of networking and the importance of remaining current within the industry, he joined the Society to tap into this security management resource.</p><p>For 20 years, he served as president, CEO, and chief investigator for AmGuard Security and Patrol Services. By the time he sold the business to a national provider in 2005, he had grown his company to include more than 300 employees to support operations in the Washington, D.C., metro area.</p><p>Having sold his company, he wasn't ready to stop working. He attained his Certified Protection Professional® (CPP) certification in 2009. "I realized that I needed more than simply business experience to compete for senior level positions within the security industry," Beaver says. "I needed a gold standard certification that would demonstrate my knowledge and competency to prospective employers. Unlike any other security industry accreditation that I've seen, the CPP certification covers a broad spectrum of security principles and practices."</p><p>"The CPP designation provided me with a distinct advantage when competing for positions, particularly in 2009, when jobs were scarce, and unemployment remained high," he adds. "The certification was instrumental in my selection for my present senior level security role. A CPP certification was written into the position description and was prerequisite for even being considered."</p><p>Beaver now serves as director of corporate security for the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. He oversees a team of 40 officers with five direct reports. His responsibilities touch access control, scheduling personnel, developing emergency preparedness and business continuity plans, budgeting for system upgrades, conducting interviews, purchasing equipment, and more. </p><p>In addition to these job responsibilities, he is presently an active member of two ASIS councils. Embracing his museum role, he serves as chair of the ASIS Cultural Properties Council. He also serves on the Global Terrorism, Political Instability, and International Crime Council. </p><p>Far from the job shortage that faced the industry a decade ago, Beaver foresees a bustling security industry moving forward. "Opportunities abound in both public and private services," he says. "As society becomes more and more complex, security opportunities will continue to grow. This potential cannot be realized passively. To be successful, you must remain actively engaged in the global security community—the ASIS community."</p>
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/May-2018-Industry-News.aspxMay 2018 Industry NewsGP0|#3795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e;L0|#03795b40d-c591-4b06-959c-9e277b38585e|Security by Industry;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<h4>​OUTDOOR SURVEILLANCE</h4><p>The Musical Instrument Museum (MIM) in Phoenix, Arizona, displays instruments collected from around the world and offers concerts and performances in addition to its conventional and interactive installations.</p><p>To enhance the security of its exterior spaces, the museum recently worked with integrator IES Communications to upgrade its outdoor surveillance system. MIM implemented a variety of Bosch cameras to provide high-quality images of the museum's outdoor areas, which include two parking lots, a courtyard at the main entrance, an additional courtyard at the student entry, an outdoor café, and a seating area. The video system also monitors outdoor special events. Supported by new exterior LED lights, cameras produce full-color images throughout the night. Built-in video analytics alert the museum's security operators to possible risks, such as objects left behind or the gathering of large crowds that may create congestion in an area.</p><p>The museum selected Altronix Pace Ethernet solutions for video transmission over existing cabling and Security Center from Genetec for management and monitoring.​</p><h4>PARTNERSHIPS AND DEALS</h4><p>Ted's Pawn in Norwood, Ohio, is using video verification technology from 3xLOGIC, Inc., to reduce false alarms and catch intruders.</p><p>Auth0 was selected by Coinsource to provide authentication for its ATMs.</p><p>Dallmeier security technology is protecting drivers and goods at premium parking areas of Euro Rastpark to combat the theft of vehicles, cargo, and fuel.</p><p>Delta Scientific barriers have been installed at Atlanta's new stadium, home to the Atlanta Falcons. The barriers were installed by Tusco.</p><p>Detection Technology announced that its x-ray detectors helped provide security at the Olympics in Pyeong­chang, South Korea. </p><p>NASCAR named Digital Ally Inc. a Preferred Technology Provider. With this new designation, Digital Ally will provide cameras to enhance security, safety, and the officiating process.</p><p>The ScotRail Alliance purchased Edesix body-worn cameras for frontline staff.</p><p>Honeywell announced that its Xtralis VCA suite of security software is integrated into the Axis Camera Application Platform from Axis Communications Inc.</p><p>Australian law firm Clayton Utz selected the Intapp business acceptance solution as part of its risk management and compliance programs.</p><p>Integrated Biometrics announced that Grupo Neoyama will serve as its primary distributor for Brazil.</p><p>Florida Atlantic University selected the Software House C•CURE 9000 security and event management platform from Johnson Controls. The platform will be used to secure the university's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine.</p><p>OnSSI appointed Warren Associates as its manufacturer's representative for northern California and northern and central Nevada.</p><p>Pelco by Schneider Electric and Ipsotek integrated their products to create a solution for managing video and analytics.</p><p>ProSource added two vendors, ICE Cable Systems and MantelMount; the company added Centricity as a group exclusive service partner.</p><p>Guardian Protection Services selected the Qolsys IQ Panel 2 as its next-generation platform following a one-year evaluation period.</p><p>Rackspace collaborated with Cisco to provide advanced protection against evolving threats in the multicloud environment.</p><p>A new partnership between SALTO Systems and Phunware will provide integrated mobile access control platforms with applications for multifamily residential properties.</p><p>Rubicon Labs joined the open source EdgeX Foundry project to unify the IoT market.</p><p>SmartMetric, Inc., appointed Hogier Gartner CIA S.A. as distributor for its biometric security cards within South America.</p><p>Speco Technologies integrated its IP cameras into Synology's Surveillance Station.</p><p>TagMaster North America, Inc., installed readers and hang tags in conjunction with ATS Traffic parking barriers and equipment for the VIP parking at Grey Eagle Casino in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.</p><p>Tangent Academy announced a Pro Partnership with 5.11 Tactical, in which 5.11 Tactical will become the official apparel of Tangent Academy.</p><p>Tech Electronics is partnering with Blue Line Technology to provide threat detection, access control, and concierge applications.</p><p>Transition Networks, Inc., partnered with Milestone Systems to integrate its switches with software into the Milestone Systems XProtect VMS.</p><p>Xtera completed interoperability testing with Infinera, a provider of Intelligent Transport Networks.​</p><h4>GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS</h4><p>Axon Public Safety Australia sold 11,000 Axon Body 2 cameras to the Victoria Police in Australia. </p><p>Drone Aviation Holding Corp. delivered its multi-mission capable tactical Winch Aerostat Small Platform to the U.S. Army.</p><p>The U.S. Coast Guard has conducted approximately 100,000 search-and-rescue operations since 2006 with support from the Rescue 21 Coastal system built by General Dynamics Mission Systems.  </p><p>IndraSoft, Inc., was awarded a multiyear task order by the U.S. Census Bureau to conduct end-to-end fingerprinting and identity proofing of selectees.</p><p>InstantEye Robotics received an order from PMA-263, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Small Tactical Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office, for additional systems to support deployed Marine infantry squads.</p><p>Mt. Vernon School District in Indiana is deploying the Security Alert Messaging system from iSIGN Media Solutions Inc.</p><p>J&S Franklin's DefenCell products were installed in two separate areas in South Australia for environmental applications including ground stabilization, flood protection, and erosion control.</p><p>Gallant Technologies Inc. successfully transitioned the technology for a non-detonable explosives training aid developed and licensed from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate.</p><p>Vicente López, one of the 135 districts that make up the Buenos Aires province, is using cameras made by Pelco, Bosch, and Axis Communications, as well as Milestone XProtect Professional video management software, as part of its surveillance system, which was integrated by Exanet S.A.</p><p>NAPCO Security Technologies, Inc., announced that its Continental Access division products are being used in a project for the Albany County Schools in Wyoming.</p><p>Optim LLC was awarded a five-year, sole-source contract to supply its FreedomView Videoscope to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol to search for illegal contraband hidden in vehicles, containers, and other conveyances. </p><p>Canada granted funds from its Community Resilience Fund to support a Ryerson University research initiative working to evaluate approaches to countering radicalization to violence in Canada.</p><p>The Republic of Kosovo is rolling out a nationwide mobile driver's license solution based on the VeriGO DriveID platform from Veridos.</p><p>VSTEP delivered NAUTIS simulators to the Royal Bahamas Defense Force in cooperation with DAMEN and Alphatron.​</p><h4>AWARDS AND CERTIFICATIONS</h4><p>AFL received patent awards for developing products and technologies within the accessories, optical connectivity, and fusion splicing divisions.</p><p>Akoustis Technologies, Inc., announced that its headquarters facility received ISO 9001:2015 certification, completing certification for all company facilities.</p><p>Allot Communications Ltd. was awarded Best Mobile Security Solution in the 2018 Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. </p><p>CNH Industrial's Ulm plant in Germany has achieved Bronze level certification in the World Class Manufacturing program.</p><p>Crestwood Technology Group earned the Counterfeit Avoidance Accreditation Program accreditation AC7402 for supply chain management.</p><p>At Mobile World Congress 2018, Evolved Intelligence was named best supplier of mobile network security solutions.</p><p>G4S announced that its North America Training Institute won three Training and Leadership Awards from HR.com and Leadership Excellence and Development.</p><p>Genetec Inc. was named one of the top employers in Montreal, Canada, by the editors of Mediacorp Canada Inc., for the eleventh consecutive year.</p><p>Just Add Power earned a Top New Technology Award for Video Wall Solutions at ISE 2018 in Amsterdam. </p><p>Jumio announced that its Netverify solution was named the gold winner in the Best Fraud Protection category by the 2018 Cybersecurity Excellence Awards. </p><p>MacAulay-Brown, Inc., renewed and updated its Quality Management System certification for ISO 9001:2015.</p><p>Oncam completed the retesting and documentation of its 360-degree solutions with Milestone XProtect open-platform IP video management software.</p><p>Securonix won multiple awards in multiple categories at this year's Cybersecurity Excellent Awards, including Most Innovative Cybersecurity Company and Best UEBA Product.</p><p>Sielox LLC recognized MCM Integrated Systems as National Business Partner of the Year.​</p><h4>ANNOUNCEMENTS</h4><p>Anixter Inc. is expanding the footprint of its North American flagship distribution Center in Illinois with 30 to 40 percent more storage capacity and new automation technology.</p><p>ASSA ABLOY acquired Phoniro to further develop verticals and scale solutions internationally.</p><p>A group of leading companies launched the Better Identity Coalition to develop policy initiatives that promote the adoption of better solutions for identity verification and authentication. Founding members include Aetna, Bank of America, IDEMIA, JPMorgan Chase, Kabbage, Mastercard, Onfido, PNC Bank, Symantec, US Bank, and Visa.</p><p>BGN Technologies announced that researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev developed a new Light Invariant Video Imaging software technology that can significantly improve picture clarity of cameras in sub-optimal lighting.</p><p>Bosch Security Systems changed its name to Bosch Building Technologies to reflect greater portfolio breadth.</p><p>Bravatek Solutions, Inc., acquired HelpComm, Inc.</p><p>Broco Rankin acquired long-time client Chamberlain Security.</p><p>Camden Door Controls celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2018 with a new rebranding look, spanning a new logo, website, and design of product guides and other collaterals.</p><p>The Cloud Security Alliance released Using Blockchain Technology to Secure Internet of Things, a white paper that explores the capabilities of blockchain technology in facilitating and improving the security of the Internet of Things. </p><p>In support of the #MeToo movement, Continuum GRC is allowing organizations to create a free custom anti-­harassment policy using its IT Audit Machine GRC software.</p><p>Erin Harrington Communications launched a new website at erinharringtoncommunications.com. </p><p>The Florida Center for Cybersecurity (FC2), launched the Florida CyberHub, a virtual environment and shared cybersecurity resource center to support cybersecurity education, workforce development, information sharing, and research across the state.</p><p>Galaxy Integrated Technologies announced that it will provide complimentary, no-charge security assessments for all schools in its service area in New England, New York, and New Jersey. </p><p>The Gaming Standards Association and Gaming Standards Association Europe created a new Technical Committee dedicated to blockchain use. </p><p>Idesco Corp. is celebrating the 75th anniversary of the company. </p><p>IDSecurityOnline.com launched a new STEM Scholarship Program in 2018 to help shape the leaders of tomorrow.</p><p>IEC Electronics will open a new state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Newark, New York.</p><p>Iron Mountain Incorporated opened a secure, state-of-the-art federal records center in Suitland, Maryland.</p><p>Konica Minolta Business Solutions U.S.A., Inc., acquired VioPoint, Inc., a company specializing in intelligent cybersecurity. </p><p>In 2017, Legrand employees volunteered more than 2,000 hours of their time, as part of the company's Better Communities program.</p><p>Miami-Dade Aviation Department and U.S. Customs and Border Protection hosted a ceremony to celebrate Miami International Airport's newly renovated Concourse E federal inspection facility for international arrivals. The facility provides expedited passport screening via facial recognition. </p><p>Nortek Security & Control introduced a Technician Certification Training Program for dealers, technicians, and integrators.</p><p>The Charter of Trust calls for binding rules and standards to build trust in cybersecurity and further advance digitalization. Initial signers of the charter are NXP, Siemens, the Munich Security Conference, Airbus, Allianz, Daimler Group, IBM, SGS, and Deutsche Telekom.</p><p>Speco Technologies added new videos to its website regarding its Digital Deterrent.</p><p>TEAM Software, Inc., launched a new Volunteer Time Off program to encourage its employee owners to give back to the community.</p><p>Viakoo joined Spiceworks and is sponsoring the Physical Security Group. </p><p>Vigilant Solutions, announced that a law enforcement agency used its facial recognition and license plate recognition technology in a kidnapping case that helped to locate the missing person and get her to safety. ​</p>
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Risk-Rising.aspxRisk RisingGP0|#28ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997;L0|#028ae3eb9-d865-484b-ac9f-3dfacb4ce997|Strategic Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<p>​Incidents of security breaches of various types continue to increase around the world, according to the 10th annual edition of Kroll's <em>Global Fraud and Risk Report.<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/0518%20NT%20Chart.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;" /></em></p><p>The report includes commissioned research by Forrester Consulting, which conducted a worldwide online survey of 540 senior executives across multiple industries. The report divides incidents into three categories: fraud, cyber (theft, loss, or attack involving information or data), and security (physical security breach at the company). For all three categories, the report breaks down the responses by country and by industry sector.</p><p>Overall, 86 percent of respondents said they experienced a cybersecurity incident in the previous 12 months, up 1 percent from the 2016 report. For fraud, 84 percent of respondents said they experienced an incident in the previous 12 months, up 2 percent from the last report. And 70 percent of respondents said they experienced a physical security incident in the previous 12 months, up 2 percent from the previous report.</p><p>Although these percentages varied from country to country, the percentage of those experiencing incidents was higher than 50 percent in every category. For example, in the United Kingdom, 94 percent of respondents said that they experienced a cybersecurity incident in the previous 12 months, but only 61 percent in Colombia said the same.</p><p>In addition, incidents of fraud could be especially costly. About 54 percent of respondents said that incidents of fraud cost their business at least 4 percent of its revenue in 2017—that is, 5 percent said the cost of fraud exceeded 10 percent of revenue, 18 percent said the cost was 7 to 10 percent of revenue, and 31 percent said the cost was 4 to 6 percent of revenue.  </p><p>In looking to the future, Kroll CEO David R. Fontaine says that at some point it may not be viable for the report to continue breaking down incidents and risks into three separate categories. In fact, that seems to be one of the report's key findings—"risks are increasingly starting to cut across areas, due to factors like economic globalization and increasing digital connections," Fontaine writes in the report's introduction. </p><p>"Organizations must adopt a holistic approach to enterprise risk management and develop integrated risk mitigation strategies to address this new threat environment," he says.  </p>
https://sm.asisonline.org/Pages/Space-Jam.aspxSpace JamGP0|#21788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f;L0|#021788f65-8908-49e8-9957-45375db8bd4f|National Security;GTSet|#8accba12-4830-47cd-9299-2b34a4344465<p>​Much of the western United States was put on notice earlier this year when the U.S. Air Force announced that it would be blocking GPS signals on its base south of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tactic—which occurred during an annual month-long military training exercise—could cause air traffic disruption and potentially require flight rerouting due to inconsistent GPS, the notice stated. While the Air Force would not confirm that the GPS disruption was a part of its yearly exercises, experts believe that the military is training its pilots to fly in conditions where GPS signals are inaccurate or nonexistent—a scenario that has become increasingly common.</p><p>Thirty-one satellites currently orbiting the earth transmit signals to civilian and military terrestrial receivers, essentially using time signals to run location-based devices and activities and syncing networks around the world. The satellites—called the GPS constellation—are owned by the United States and operated by the Air Force. Since 1978, the satellites have provided location, navigation, and timing capabilities to the military, and an unencrypted version became available for public use in the 1980s. Over the years, the signals from the GPS constellation have become critical for a variety of applications, including communications, precise time measurements, and critical infrastructure technologies—in addition to its military uses of navigation, target tracking, and missile guidance. </p><p>However, the signal—which is inherently weak—is susce​ptible to outside interference. Anything from space weather to malfunctioning machinery to malicious actors can cause problems with GPS, including blocking the signal—called jamming—and sending false signals, known as spoofing. Even small interferences can cause big headaches.<img src="/ASIS%20SM%20Callout%20Images/0518%20NS%20Chart.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:466px;" /> </p><p>For example, a man who drove a company car purchased a GPS jammer to keep his boss from knowing his whereabouts, but when he passed near Newark airport in New Jersey, the jammer blocked signals from reaching the air traffic controller system. Although the sale and use of jammers is illegal in the United States, they can be purchased online for less than $50 and can successfully hide a vehicle's location.</p><p>In January 2016, a routine equipment switch caused a series of 13-microsecond timing errors in half of the GPS constellation satellites, which triggered about 12 hours of confusion for computers, networks, and timing devices around the world. </p><p>The U.S. government has referred to GPS as a single point of failure for critical infrastructure and, in 2004, called for the U.S. Department of Transportation to acquire a backup capability for GPS. However, an alternative has never come to fruition. </p><p>U.S. President Donald Trump reemphasized the need for redundancy by including a section in the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act that requires the U.S. Departments of Defense, Transportation, and Homeland Security to demonstrate a GPS backup capability within the next 18 months.</p><p>"We were concerned that the federal government was not doing all of the things it said it would do in order to protect GPS signals, which are being interfered with on a regular basis," says Dana Goward, the president of the Resilient Navigation and Timing Foundation (RNTF). He established the nonprofit in 2013 to protect, toughen, and augment GPS signals. "Since we started, over the last five years, GPS has been interfered with more and more," he notes.</p><p>Goward and other members of RNTF are also members of the National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board, which has existed since the call for a GPS backup capability was issued in 2004. </p><p>It's hard to tell exactly how big an impact a widespread GPS outage would have on critical infrastructure sectors around the world, but Goward notes that glitches such as the January 2016 blip can foreshadow what systems might be affected. "The implementation and use of GPS signals is so widely spread for so many different things it was never intended to be used for that it's really impossible to outline all the bad things that would happen and the sequence in which they would occur," he says. "But there are some things we do know." </p><p>Say a terrorist plants a high-powered GPS jammer hidden in a suitcase in the middle of a city. Transportation will probably be the first system visibly affected, which could quickly impact an entire metropolitan area, Goward says. Traffic lights will become desynchronized and GPS-based apps will no longer function, creating distracted and dangerous driving conditions. Airplanes and other forms of mass transportation will have to slow down or alter routes to stay in contact with people who can keep them on course. Package delivery routes as well as land, sea, and air-based supply chain operations will be disrupted. "All forms of transportation will be forced to carry less capacity in the area," Goward notes.</p><p>Countless systems that rely on GPS's perfectly synchronized timing—including data networks, financial activities, the electric grid, and other utilities—will slowly become out of sync, causing system failures. </p><p>"When the networks start to fall apart, it's hard to tell how much of a cascading failure you're going to see," Goward notes. "Networks depend on each other. It's really such a vast and hyper complex system, the structures of which are not known and may not be knowable."</p><p>Preventing GPS glitches is a multifaceted challenge. The GPS satellites themselves are fairly resilient—they are replaced on a rotating basis depending on their estimated operational life. Still, mechanical glitches like the one that caused the January 2016 blip are possible. The signals transmitted from the satellites are even weaker than cosmic background noise, and Goward notes that even upgraded equipment won't substantially change the strength.</p><p>"The basic problem is fundamental physics," Goward says. "Satellites are 12,500 miles up in space and powered by solar panels and transmitting all the time—unlike other satellites that can store up their solar power, GPS satellites have to transmit all the time. They will always be really weak and easy to interfere with."</p><p>An inherent area of weakness is the equipment used to receive the GPS signal sent by the satellites—anything from cell phones to networks to military ground stations that encrypt the signal.</p><p>"Most GPS receivers in use right now are very vulnerable to jamming and spoofing," Goward notes. "The technology in terms of antennas and software is available to make them much less susceptible to jamming and spoofing, but it costs a little extra and users don't feel motivated to incorporate anti-jamming and spoofing technology into their receivers and systems, even when they involve and support critical infrastructure like phone and IT networks."</p><p>RNTF is working with the government to establish guidance or best practices to improve GPS receiver security.While a fix is relatively simple, Goward says he doubts most companies will make the upgrade unless they are told to do so or they experience a GPS-induced crisis. "We think that for critical infrastructure applications there's a government role there to advocate for, encourage, and perhaps require users to have the latest anti-jamming and spoofing technology."</p><p>Military-level encrypted GPS signals aren't exempt from jamming or spoofing, either. While the use of a secured ground system to control the broadcast of an encrypted signal, along with military-grade receivers, provides an inherent level of protection, it's not foolproof—and it only works when it's used properly.</p><p>"Because of the encryption, that makes military receivers as a practical matter more difficult to use, so we had seen any number of photographs of military folks in the field with GPS receivers they bought at Walmart strapped to their arms and using them instead of military receivers," Goward notes. Encrypted equipment tends to be stored under lock and key—and is usually unwieldy—making it more cumbersome to use. </p><p>It's suspected that the infamous straying of a U.S. naval ship into Iranian waters in 2016 was a result of the sailors using unencrypted receivers that allowed Iran to spoof the signal and direct them into the country's territory. And headlines were made when the movements of U.S. military personnel at several overseas bases could be tracked via a GPS-based fitness app—no jamming or spoofing required.  </p><p>The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is in the middle of upgrading the military ground systems and replacing the current GPS constellation—which is near the end of its intended operational life—but the efforts have faced a series of setbacks. The new generation of satellites, called GPS III, are expected to provide a stronger signal that is more resistant to spoofing and jamming and will permit interoperability with other global navigation systems. But, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), the acquisition and timeline of deploying the new satellites has run into several roadblocks, delaying the launch of the new equipment. </p><p>For example, the first GPS III satellite built, which is slated to become operational in 2019, includes energy storage devices that had not been appropriately tested by the subcontractor. When the Air Force discovered the failure to test the equipment, it made the subcontractor remove the devices from the second and third satellites currently being built, but "decided to accept the first satellite and launch it 'as is' with the questionable capacitors installed," the GAO reports. The rest of the GPS III satellites are expected to be launched and operational—replacing the current devices—by 2021.</p><p>Three components of the upgrade—the new ground control systems, GPS III satellites, and contingency operations programs—are expected to face "numerous challenges" over the next 18 months, GAO notes. "If any of the three programs cannot resolve their challenges, the operation of the first GPS III satellite—and constellation sustainment—may be delayed."</p><p>Meanwhile, Goward and the RNTF are continuing to encourage the government to promote more secure GPS receiver technology and build a backup capability when—not if—the GPS signal fails. </p><p>"We are concerned that the federal government does not have a central point of accountability for protecting GPS," Goward explains. "It's possible that this lack of responsibility and governance will mean that nothing is going to happen until the nation has suffered substantial damage because of the failure to protect, toughen, and augment GPS." ​</p>

 UPCOMING EVENTS AND EDUCATION

07 - 08 May 2018
Violence Assessment and Intervention ​(Rhode Island)

​16 - 17 May 2018
ASIS NYC 2018 (New York)

13 June 2018
Harnessing Culture and Technology for Prevention (Webinar)

2 - 5 July 2018
ASIS / IE Business School​​ (Madrid)

9 - 10 July 2018
Executive Protection​ (Chicago)​

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