May SM Online

National Security

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May 2019 SM Online
 

​BODY CAMERAS

More than 80 percent of U.S. police agencies​ are either using body cams now or have plans to do so in the near future, according to a survey by the Police Executive Research Forum. 

POLICE USE OF BODY CAMS

Washington, D.C., officials released the results of their own randomized controlled trial of body cam​ use by the city's police department. The study surprised many by finding that body cam use had no detectable effects on police discretion, as measured by arrests for disorderly conduct.

​AGING INFRASTRUCTURE

The vast, aging U.S. Coast Guard infrastructure includes piers, docks, and other facilities. The Coast Guard estimates that its backlog of improvement projects ​would take $1.7 billion and nearly 400 years to address. 

MEXICO

After a few years of declining murder rates, cartels in Mexico are locked​ in bloody turf wars, contributing to a dramatic rise in murders in 2017, according to a report from Stratfor. 

911 TECHNOLOGY

A new white paper explores how 911 communication centers can navigate ​Next Generation 911 technologies and the FirstNet public safety broadband network.

IT SUPPLY CHAIN

The U.S. Government Accountability Office assessed supply chains that U.S. federal agencies use to procure IT systems.​

​PRIVACY IN EUROPE

The European Union began enforcing the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018, forcing organizations to comply with vast privacy and data security regulations.

PRIVACY IN CALIFORNIA

California's Consumer Privacy Act has similar privacy requirements as the EU's General Data Protection Regulation and goes into effect on 1 January 2020.

CENSUS

The U.S. Supreme Court will review a challenge a citizenship question in the 2020 census.​

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

The U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that employers may be liable for not effectively addressing and stopping rumors​ of an alleged sexual relationship between a female employee and a male supervisor. 

TSA

Two U.S. Congressmen reintroduced legislation to improve the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) frontline workforce​, granting TSA officers certain benefits.

RACIAL DISCRIMINATION

The New York Commission on Human Rights issued new guidelines ​outlining that segregating people based on their hair or hairstyles is a type of racial discrimination. 

​SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

The Nevada Gaming Commission fined casino magnate Steve Wynn's former company a record $20 million​ for failing to investigate sexual misconduct claims against Wynn.

CORRUPTION

Pakistan's National Accountability Bureau indicted the country's opposition leader, Shahbaz Sharif, of corruption charges related to a housing scheme.​

TRANSGENDER DISCRIMINATION

An Iowa District Court ordered the state to pay a transgender nurse $120,000 in damages​ due to gender-related discrimination. 

FIREARMS

New York's Senate Bill S101A would restrict schools' ability to authorize the possession of a weapon​ on school grounds to certain officers or agents of a law enforcement agency.

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWNS

The U.S. Government Employee Fair Treatment Act of 2019 requires federal government or D.C. public employees​ furloughed or required to work during a lapse in appropriations to be compensated for the lapse on the earliest date possible after the lapse ends.

SEXUAL ASSAULT

New York's Senate Bill S2440 (19R) pauses the statute of limitations for criminal and civil prosecution​ for sexual offenses committed against children, so the clock does not begin to run until the victim turns 23.

FAMILY LEAVE

New Jersey's S2528 (18R) expands the state's paid family leave program, doubling how much time employees can take off for the care of a new child or sick relative​, and raising pay received during the absence.

AGE DISCRIMINATION

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled that the Age Discrimination in Employment Act does not provide age bias protection to job applicants​ who allege they were victimized by disparate impact discrimination.

TRANSPARENCY

The Los Angeles County Superior Court ruled against police unions, finding that secret records of police misconduct and shootings, even ones filed before 2018, must be released under a new state transparency law, SB 1421.