August 2017 Legal Report Resources

Strategic Security
August 2017 Legal Report Resources
 

​Negligence. An employer can be sued for negligence by an employee who is injured on the job when the injuries are the result of a dispute that began outside the workplace, a Louisiana appellate court ruled.

Background checks. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued new advice for employers conducting background checks on prospective employees. The guidance stresses keeping disclosures to prospective employees about background checks—which is required under U.S. law—simple by using easy to understand language.

Compensation. Men can be paid more than women for the same work based on salary history, a U.S. federal appeals court recently ruled. “If prior salary alone is responsible for the disparity, requiring an employer to consider factors in addition to prior salary cannot resolve the problem that the EEOC and the plaintiff have identified,” wrote Judge Lynn S. Adelmann in the opinion for the court.

Cybersecurity. U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order that aims to strengthen U.S. government networks and critical infrastructure. The executive order is broken into three parts: securing U.S. government networks, enhancing critical infrastructure cybersecurity, and improving the nation’s cybersecurity.

Sanctuary cities. Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law legislation that bans sanctuary cities, effectively making it a crime for police and sheriff departments to not cooperate with U.S. immigration enforcement.

Drug Testing. West Virginia enacted legislation that broadens the circumstances under which employers can conduct workplace drug and alcohol testing. 

Retaliation. The American Dental Association will pay $1.95 million to resolve charges of retaliation discrimination based on an investigation by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 

Damages. Companies can recover damages from employees who hack into their systems to access proprietary information without authorization, a U.S. federal court ruled. 

Corruption. The former minister of mines and geology for the Republic of Guinea was convicted for his role in a scheme to launder bribes paid to him by executives from China Sonangol International and China International Fund.